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5th Pediatric Allergy and Asthma Meeting (PAAM)

Clinical and Translational Allergy20188 (Suppl 2) :26

https://doi.org/10.1186/s13601-018-0204-0

  • Published:

O1

Evolution of immunologic parameters in children subjected to food oral immunotherapy with cow's milk during a 10-year follow-up

Sara Bellón*, Laura Sánchez, Loreto González, Ana Moreira, Teresa Bracamonte, Sergio Quevedo, Luis Á. Echeverría

Pediatric Allergy Unit, Severo Ochoa University Hospital, Leganés, Spain

Correspondence: Sara Bellón - sara.bellon.alonso@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):O1

Introduction

Food oral immunotherapy (OIT) has recently become an alternative to elimination diets in patients with cow’s milk IgE-mediated allergy. Here we report the evolution of skin prick test and immuno CAP through a 10-year period and the results of treatment during long-term follow-up.

Methods

In the period 2007–2017, one hundred and eight children with persistent cow’s milk allergy, confirmed by open oral food challenge, have been included in our OIT protocol. During the induction phase, they gradually received increasing doses of this food until a minimum of 3600 mg of protein per day.

We subsequently monitored these children annually performing skin and blood test to determine evolution of immunologic parameters and carrying out strict control of new symptoms and possible adverse reactions.

Results

In the analysed period, 108 patients underwent cow’s milk OIT with an initial median age of 6.38 years (2–16 years). A 53.7% (58) were males.

Follow-up time varies among our patients depending on the beginning date of OIT and reaches 10 years in the oldest cases.

In our series, the success rate of patients who have undergone cow’s milk OIT is 91.6%. Treatment failure was found in three patients during the initial induction phase and in six during the maintenance one. The most common reason of failed therapy was serious adverse reactions (44%) followed by development of eosinophilic esophagitis (22%). Two patients refused to continue OIT treatment because they dislike cow’s milk and another one discontinued OIT because of the coexistence of complicated kidney disease. Assessment of permanent tolerance was not proved in any of the patient.

Evolution of skin prick test and inmuno CAP is shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3 respectively. The most significant decrease, both in prick and CAP values, is reached in the first 3 years of follow-up, as shown in the following charts. Regarding casein CAP levels specifically, we found an average decrease of 71.6% between last control titres and initial ones.
Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Skin prick test evolution

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Dilution (cow’s milk) prick test evolution

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Immuno CAP evolution

Conclusion

OIT is a novel form of treatment that has already proven to be effective, reaching success rates greater than 90% in our experience. Decrease in prick and inmuno CAP levels is mostly seen in the first two or 3 years of follow-up and accurately predict tolerance in most of the patients.

O2

Cow's milk protein consumption and risk of adverse reactions in children subjected to food oral immunotherapy with cow's milk during a long-term follow-up

Sara Bellón*, Laura Sánchez, Loreto González, Ana Moreira, Teresa Bracamonte, Sergio Quevedo, Luis Á. Echeverría

Pediatric Allergy Unit, Severo Ochoa University Hospital, Leganés, Spain

Correspondence: Sara Bellón - sara.bellon.alonso@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):O2

Introduction

OIT (oral immunotherapy) has proven efficacy in achieving cow’s milk tolerance. However, there is still low data about tolerance persistence rate and adverse effects (AE), not only at the escalation dose period, but also in maintenance period.

Methods

A 10-year clinical follow up study conducted in patients who went under cow’s milk IOT. During this period, we analysed: (1) Current cow’s milk protein consumption (2) Rate and severity of AE related to long-term follow-up. (3) Allergy test: SPT (skin prick test) and sIgE (specific IgE) to cow’s milk (CM) and casein at the beginning of IOT.

Results

108 children between 2 and 16 years old were included. 90.3% of them are currently consuming more than 200 ml of raw cow’s milk/day (group A). Group B was defined as children who are consuming less than 200 ml of raw cow’s milk/day. 3.2% of children are taking cow’s protein contained in dairy and 2.1% are able to tolerate only traces.

Significant statistically differences were detected in both groups respect SPT to cow’s milk (8.34 mm ± 3.40 vs. 12.25 mm ± 4.11, p < 0.029) and casein SPT (6.09 mm ± 2.99 vs. 10.25 mm ± 4.87, p < 0.010). Specific IgE levels to casein were higher in group B, but failed to reach statistical significance (36.80 KU/L ± 83.89 vs. 118.02 KU/L ± 91.55, p < 0.063).

Regarding adverse effects during the follow-up, 47.1% of our patients presented adverse reaction in some form, and 35.4% were defined as severe in accordance with Clark classification of allergic adverse reactions. We also found statistically significant difference in the initial casein SPT (7.09 mm ± 3.17 vs. 5.58 mm ± 2.81, p < 0.012), the initial specific IgE levels to beta-lactoglobulin (23.03 KU/L ± 33.51 vs. 7.59 KU/L ± 18.19, p < 0.005) and to casein (66.95 KU/L ± 105.41 vs. 19.65 KU/L ± 47.44, p < 0.004) between the group of children with adverse reactions and the one without them.

Conclusion

Cow's milk OIT is a safe and effective treatment in the medium term for those children who don’t acquire spontaneus tolerance. Adverse reactions are usually mild and are more likely to appear in patients with initial bigger SPT and high levels of specific IgE. Allergy test could be a good biomarker of prediction of final cow's milk protein consumption.

O3

Improvement of safety during the induction and maintenance phase of oral immunotherapy with cow’s milk and egg when assisted with omalizumab

Cristina Blasco-Valero, Paula Galván-Blasco*, Teresa Garriga-Baraut, Blanca Vilá-Indurain

Hospital Vall D’hebron, Barcelona, Spain

Correspondence: Paula Galván-Blasco - pauligalvan@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):O3

Introduction

Oral immunotherapy (OIT) is a promising therapeutic alternative to food allergen avoidance in allergic patients. Nevertheless, it is associated with frequent adverse reactions that sometimes can be life-threatening and the need of adrenaline administration is not infrequent. Results from previous trials suggest that the use of omalizumab (OMZ) could potentially lead to safer and more efficient OIT protocols, by reducing the number and severity of reactions, and increasing allergen tolerance threshold. Currently, there is no consensus about the length of OMZ therapy. We here report our experience with a protocol of OMZ-assisted OIT in patients with egg and cow’s milk allergy.

Methods

We performed a retrospective observational study of nineteen pediatric patients under an OMZ-assisted OIT with cow’s milk (15 patients) or raw egg white (4 patients). Patients selected showed elevated levels of specific IgE (sIgE) to casein or ovomucoid and grade 2–3 anaphylactic symptoms. All patients/parents provided informed consent. OMZ was administered a minimum of 16 weeks before the start of the induction phase. Levels of total IgE, sIgE and skin prick test (SPT) were assessed, as well as the number and severity of adverse reactions during the induction and maintenance phase.

Results

The induction phase lasted a mean of 5 months; only2 anaphylactic reactions that required the use of adrenaline occurred. The dose of OMZ ranged from 300 to 1200 mg per month depending of total IgE values and weight. Nowadays, 12 patients have reached the maintenance phase. At this point, we decrease the dose of Omalizumab in 10 patients and in two cases was successfully discontinued (Fig. 1). All of these patients are currently tolerating the full maintenance dose, referring mild symptoms only 4 patients of the cow’s milk group. The maximumfollow-up extends to 5 years and only 3 severe adverse reactions have been reported, all associated to cofactors. In both groups, SPT diminished after the induction phase and over time. sIgE to cow’s milk and egg fractions increased during the induction phase, decreasing afterwards during the maintenance phase.

Conclusions

The present report describes the optimized safety in high risk patients undergoing OMZ-assisted OIT. The reduction or discontinuation of OMZ may be achieved without losing tolerance or increasing the number of severe reactions.

O4

Cow’s milk allergy from infancy to school age

Emma Goksör*, Natascha Lougheide-Camejo, Bernt Alm, Göran Wennergren

Department of Pediatrics, Institution of Clinical Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden

Correspondence: Emma Goksör - emma.goksor@vgregion.se

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):O4

Introduction

Allergy towards cow’s milk protein is the most common food allergy during infancy. The prognosis is considered to be good, but reports of prevalence and prognosis are varying.

The aim is to analyse the prevalence of cow’s milk allergy during infancy, and the prognosis and comorbidity until 12 years.

Methods

Data were obtained from a longitudinal study of children born in western Sweden in 2003. Parents answered postal questionnaires when the children were 6 months and 1, 4, 8 and 12 years. Questions about doctor-diagnosed food allergy, triggering allergens and symptoms were asked at age 1, 4, 8 and 12 years. At 4, 8 and 12 years, questions about allergy testing were included. The response rate at 12 months was 88% (4987/5654) and at 12 years 76% (3637/4777), that is 64% of the 5654 originally included.

Results

The prevalence of reported doctor-diagnosed cow’s milk allergy in infancy was 3.5% (173/4944) and it was the most common reported food allergy with 72%. Most children with doctor-diagnosed cow’s milk allergy in infancy reported symptoms from milk only (55%), while another 30% had symptoms also from eggs; 64% had eczema during infancy.

At 12 years, 36% reported no allergic disease at all. However, 15% still reported symptoms from cow’s milk and 24% from other foods. 12% reported persistent symptoms at all follow-ups (4, 8, and 12 years). Most of the children who grew out of symptoms did so between 4 and 8 years.

Over 90% of the children with persistent food-allergy at 12 years reported other allergic manifestations. In addition, 51% of the children who had become symptom-free from food-allergy at 12 years reported having other allergic manifestations, like asthma, rhinitis and eczema instead.

Having other food allergies than cow’s milk during infancy increased the risk of doctor-diagnosed food allergy at 12 years (OR 4.3; 95% CI 1.8–10.1), compared to those with only cow’s milk allergy. In addition, eczema during infancy (OR 2.9; 1.2–7.5), more severe symptoms (OR 3.7; 1.6–8.6) and parental asthma (OR 2.4; 1.01–5.9) increased the risk.

Conclusion

Of children with doctor-diagnosed cow’s milk allergy during infancy 85% became symptom-free before 12 years of age. Multiple food allergy in infancy, more severe disease, eczema and parental asthma increased the risk of persistent food-allergy at 12 years of age.

O5

Children with Asian-born parents living in Melbourne have more allergy in the first 6 years of life

Noor H. A. Suaini1,2*, Jennifer J. Koplin2, Justine A. Ellis1,2,3, David J. Martino1,2, Shyamali C. Dharmage4, Adrian J. Lowe4, Mimi L. K. Tang1,2,5, Anne-Louise Ponsonby1,4, Lyle C. Gurrin4, Melissa Wake1,2,6, Katrina J. Allen1,2,5,7, for the HealthNuts study group

1Department of Pediatrics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; 2Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; 3Centre for Social and Early Emotional Development, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria, Australia; 4The School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Carlton, Australia; 5Department of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Royal Children’s Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; 6The Department of Pediatrics and the Liggins Institute, The University of Auckland, Auckland, Australia; 7Institute of Inflammation and Repair, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom

Correspondence: Noor H. A. Suaini - noor.suaini@mcri.edu.au

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):O5

Introduction

We previously found that Melbourne infants with Asian-born parents are three times more likely to have food allergy than infants with Australian-born (predominantly Caucasian) parents. It is not known if this increased likelihood translates to higher rates of allergic comorbidities later in childhood. Using data from a longitudinal population-based study of children in Melbourne, Australia, we aim to assess whether the evolution of infantile food allergy is associated with an increased risk of other allergic diseases in later childhood and whether there is a differential pattern in this evolution amongst infants with Asian-born compared to non-Asian born parents.

Methods

Participants were recruited at 12-months from community immunisation centres (N = 5276) and followed up at 6 years old (N = 4411). Of those followed up, 3131 had a parent born in Australia, UK or Europe (non-Asians) and 425 in East Asia (Asians), while others were excluded from analyses. Food allergy status at age one and 6 years was determined using skin prick tests (SPT) and oral food challenge. SPT to aeroallergens were also undertaken. Data on asthma, hayfever and eczema were obtained from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaires. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals.

Results

At age six, hayfever and aeroallergen sensitisation were more common in children of Asian parents (28.3%, 95% CI 24.1–32.9; 69%, 95% CI 63.4–74.2, respectively) than children of non-Asian parents (17.6%, 95% CI, 16.3–19.0; 36.9%, 95% CI 34.9–39 respectively; both p < 0.001). However, asthma prevalence was similar in Asians (12.9%, 95% CI 10.0–16.6) and non-Asians (14.5%, 95% CI 13.3–15.8; p = 0.387).

Children with food allergy and eczema at age one were 5 times more likely to be diagnosed with asthma at 6 years, irrespective of parental country of birth (4.8, 95% CI 3.4–6.8 for non-Asians; 5.6, 95% CI 2.4–12.9 for Asians; p < 0.001 for both). They were also 3 times more likely to have hayfever (non-Asians OR 3.3, 95% CI 2.3–4.7, p < 0.001; Asians OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.3–4.9, p = 0.006).

Conclusion

Children of Asian-born parents in Australia not only have more food allergy and eczema in infancy but also go on to have more aeroallergen sensitisation and hayfever by age 6 years. Interestingly however, rates of asthma at age 6 years old are not higher in children of Asian-born. Having food allergy and eczema in infancy is strongly associated with asthma and hayfever later in childhood, irrespective of parental country of birth.

O6

Improving safety of egg oral immunotherapy with a boiled-egg protocol

Adrianna Machinena*, Montserrat Alvaro, Jaime Lozano, Carmen Riggioni, Mónica Piquer, Olga Dominguez, Rosa Jimenez, Maria Teresa Giner, Ana Maria Plaza

Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology Department, Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Barcelona, Spain

Correspondence: Adrianna Machinena - amachinena@hsjdbcn.org

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):O6

Introduction

Our group has previously published data regarding safety in a raw egg-OIT protocol, reporting adverse reactions in 7.6% of doses. Safety of egg oral immunotherapy (OIT) is a source of concern. Many studies report early discontinuation in egg-OIT due to severe adverse events. However, one of the aims of OIT protocols is to prevent severe reactions after accidental exposure in children with more persistent/severe egg-allergy.

To evaluate the safety of boiled egg (BE)-OIT up-dosing phase protocol in egg allergic children.

Methods

Prospective study of egg allergic children following the protocol from January 2015. Data are collected for demographics, adverse events at oral food challenge (OFC) and during up-dosing phase. Specific-IgE (s-IgE) and skin prick test (SPT) are expressed with median. Written informed consent has been signed. Open OFC (PRACTALL consensus) with BE was performed, confirming allergy. Anaphylaxis was defined following EAACI position paper criteria. A BE-OIT protocol was set up reaching a total dose of 1 cooked egg in 11 weeks.

Results

27 patients have been enrolled, 74.1% (20/27) boys, median age 9 years (IQ range, 7–12). 59.3% (16/27) had previous anaphylaxis history and all underwent an open OFC previous to start OIT-protocol except 2 patients because of recent reaction. At OFC: Median Total IgE 1065.5 KU/L (416.5–1914.2) and s-IgE: ovalbumin (OVA)-sIgE 3.19 KU/L (0.74–13.3), ovomucoid (OVM)-sIgE 4.47 KU/L (1.91–20.4), egg white (EW)-sIgE 6.6 KU/L (2.31–26.6). Median SPT for: OVA 7.7 mm (6.2–10.5), OVM 9.7 mm (7.6–11.6), EW 10.4 mm (7.7–12.2). 51.9% (14/27) presented anaphylaxis. OIT up-dosing phase: 74.1% (20/27) patients completed it in an average of 13 weeks, reaching 7.5 gr of BE-protein. 70.3% of patients (19/27) had adverse events: 48.1% gastrointestinal, 41% anaphylaxis, 14.8% respiratory and 14.8% cutaneous. 11 (41%) patients had anaphylaxis, 6 at hospital during up-dosing and 5 at home. Adrenaline was administered in 3 patients (11.1%), 2 at home and 1 at hospital; they withdrew the protocol. In all, 7 patients dropped out: 4 (14.8%) due to anaphylaxis and 3 for family reasons. 2554 doses were administrated and 61 reactions occurred (2.4% of doses). The decrease of ovomucoid-sIgE and egg white-sIgE from initial time and after 1 year of treatment has statistical significance (p 0.007–0.008 respectively).

Conclusion

BE-OIT up-dosing phase protocol could be completed in most children (70.4%) almost within the expected time. The most frequent adverse events were gastrointestinal, followed by anaphylaxis. 14.8% of the patients who withdrew the protocol had anaphylaxis and needed adrenaline. The rate of adverse events per doses was 2.4%. Children were able to eat 1 cooked egg (7.5 gr of protein) which improves children’s diet by including baked and usual amounts of fully cooked egg.

O7

Allergic rhinitis in children with asthma is under recognised and undertreated

Miranda Crealey*, Ursula Caulfield, Angela Mernagh, Miriam Kennedy, Michael Williamson, Fiona Healy

Department of Pediatric Respiratory Medicine, Temple St Children’s University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland

Correspondence: Miranda Crealey - mirandac@eircom.net

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):O7

Introduction

Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a disorder of the nose induced after allergen exposure by an immunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated inflammation of the membranes lining the nose [1]. Typical symptoms include nasal discharge, sneezing, rhinorrhoea and nasal blockage and it is frequently associated with conjunctivitis. Over 80% of asthmatics have rhinitis and 10–40% of patients with rhinitis have asthma suggesting the concept of “one airway, one disease” [2]. AR has a significant impact on quality of life impairing sleep, concentration and exam results [3].

Methods

Data was collected prospectively on successive asthmatic patients with AR attending the respiratory clinic in Temple St Children’s hospital (TSH) using a questionnaire modified from the Allergic rhinitis in Asthma (ARIA) questionnaire between March and May 2017. SPSS™ software package was used and Chi square test looked for associations between categorical variables.

Results

Data was collected on 89 consecutive patients with AR and asthma. Table 1 reports the clinical characteristics.
Table 1

Clinical features of children with allergic rhinitis and asthma (N = 89)

Median age (upper quartile, lower quartile)

7.5 years (5.5, 9)

Symptoms

 Nasal discharge

57 (72%)

 Sneezing

83 (93%)

 Nasal obstruction

70 (78%)

 Nasal itching

56 (63%)

Watery itchy eyes

Diagnosis: aeroallergen sensitisation

 SPT done

68 (76%)

 1 or more positive SPT

60 (88%)

 Specific IgE done

45 (50%)

 SPT or specific IgE done

76 (85%)

Classification of AR

Intermittent

29 (33%)

 Mild

20 (69%)

 Moderate-severe

9 (31%)

Persistent

60 (67%)

 Mild

28 (47%)

 Moderate-severe

32 (53%)

Asthma management (GINA stage)

 Stage 1

3 (4%)

 Stage 2

24 (27%)

 Stage 3

43 (48%)

 Stage 4/5

18 (20%)

Leukotriene receptor antagonist

65 (73%)

AR treatment

 No treatment

20 (23%)

 Intermittent treatment

55 (61%)

 Regular treatment

14 (16%)

HDM house dust mite, SPT skin prick test, IgE immunoglobulin E, AR allergic rhinitis

44 (49%) did not have a diagnosis of AR in their medical notes but met the criteria for diagnosis on completion of the questionnaire. 73% were commenced on new AR medication after completion of the questionnaire (15 antihistamine, 22 intranasal corticosteroid, 60 nasal douching).

Conclusion

Many children with asthma and AR have persistent AR symptoms and 23% are not taking any AR medication. Almost half of this cohort did not previously have a diagnosis of AR and 73% were prescribed new medication after completion of the audit questionnaire. This highlights a lack of awareness of AR among both patients and healthcare professionals. Since this audit was completed, we have designed an algorithm for the management AR in the clinic and will re-audit later in 2017. We recommend regularly looking for AR in asthmatic patients, especially in those with uncontrolled asthma symptoms.

References
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    Holgate ST. Allergy: Edinburgh :Saunders, 2012. 4th ed.; 2012.

     
  2. 2.

    Brozek JL, Bousquet J, Baena-Cagnani CE, Bonini S, Canonica GW, Casale TB, et al. Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) guidelines: 2010 revision. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2010;126(3):466–76.

     
  3. 3.

    Valls-Mateus M, Marino-Sanchez F, Ruiz-Echevarría K, Cardenas-Escalante P, Jiménez-Feijoo R, Blasco-Lozano J et al. Nasal obstructive disorders impair health-related quality of life in adolescents with persistent allergic rhinitis: a real-life study. Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2017 Apr 19. https://doi.org/10.1111/pai.12724.

     

O8

Efficacy of allergen blocker mechanical barrier gel on symptom and quality of life in patients with allergic rhinitis

Sirin Kose Seda, Atakul Gizem*, Asilsoy Suna, Karaman Ozkan, Uzuner Nevin, Anal Ozden

Department of Immunology and Allergy, Faculty of Medicine, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey

Correspondence: Atakul Gizem - drgizematakul@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):O8

Introduction

Control of environmental and triggering factors is important in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. In recent years, physical barrier methods have been used to prevent contact between the allergen agent and the mucous membrane. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of allergen blocker mechanical barrier gel by symptom scores and quality of life in patients with allergic rhinitis.

Methods

A total of 45 patients with allergic rhinitis, between 6 and 18 years of age were included. Allergen blocker gel was recommended at least twice a day in patients with allergic rhinitis who had symptoms during examination. Participants were assessed by nasal sypmtom score (NSS), ocular symptom score (OSS), total symptom score (TSS), visual analogue scale (VAS) and quality of life using questionnaires, at pretreatment, 1st week and 1st month.

Results

The study consisted of 45 patients, 42.2% (19) girls and 57.8% (26) boys. Family history of allergic disease was found in 38 (84.4%) patients. Nineteen (42%) patients were allergic to house dust mite, 6 (13%)to pollen and 3 (17.5%) to cat dander, and 17 (38%) had mix allergies. Thirty (66.7%) patients were receiving at least one treatment (24.4% antihistamines, 42.2% nasal corticosteroids, 40% montelukast). Symptom scores decreased significantly in both participants, either using or not using medications (P < 0.001). Statistically significant decrease was observed in NSS, OSS, TSS and VAS after treatment with allergen blocker gel in all patients (p < 0.001). In the quality of life scale, the post-treatment values of the patients significantly improved compared to the pre-treatment values.

Conclusion

Allergen blocker mechanical barrier gel therapy is seen as an effective treatment option in patients with allergic rhinitis when evaluated by symptom scores and quality of life scale.

O10

Whole-genome shotgun sequencing for nasopharyngeal microbiome in preschool children with asthma exacerbation

Leung Ting Fan1*, Kwok Jaime2, Song Yuping1, Tang Man Fung1, Tung Christine2, Chan Renee Wan-Yi1, Leung Agnes Sze-Yin1, Tao Kin Pong1, Wong Gary Wing-Kin1, Tsui Stephen Kwok-Wing2

1Department of Pediatrics, the Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China; 2School of Biomedical Sciences, the Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China

Correspondence: Leung Ting Fan - leungtf@netvigator.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):O10

Introduction

Several studies reported upper airway microbiota in children with bronchiolitis and recurrent wheeze using 16S rRNA-based sequencing approach. However, there has not been any metagenomic study that delineates the high-resolution composition of airway microbiota in these patients. This study characterised nasopharyngeal (NP) microbiome of Chinese children with asthma exacerbation.

Methods

NP secretions were collected in Jan-Apr 2015 from 76 preschool children, which consisted of 24 cases Hospitalised for human rhinovirus (HRV)-associated asthma exacerbations, 14 inpatient controls with upper respiratory tract infection (RTI) who were virus-negative, and 38 community controls without any RTI for at least 4 weeks. Genomic DNA extracted by PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit (MO BIO Laboratories) was sequenced using Illumina HiSeq X Ten. High-quality reads were mapped to human reference genome Ensembl version GRCh38.87 using Burrows-Wheeler Aligner version 0.7.15-r1140. Following removal of human sequences, these reads underwent microbial taxonomic classification using MetaPh1An2 version 2.6.0. Heatmaps of relative abundances for bacteria and viruses and cladogram were generated using R version 3.3.1 and MetaPh1An2’s utility scripts respectively. Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) scores for microbial abundances were calculated by LDA Effect Size programme.

Results

The mean (SD) age of cases, inpatient controls and community controls was 3.5 (1.0), 3.5 (1.0) and 4.9 (0.7) years respectively. All groups had low but similar NP biomass (5–7% of all sequence reads). NP biodiversity as represented by Shannon diversity index was lower in cases with asthma exacerbations than community controls median [IQR]: 3.49 [2.81–3.97] vs. 4.17 [3.24–5.84], P = 0.029) but similar to inpatient controls (3.44 [2.30–4.46], P = 0.674). Detailed microbiome analyses revealed patients with asthma exacerbation to have higher levels of viruses (log LDA score 5.20, P = 0.0031) and lower levels of bacteria (log LDA score 5.20, P = 0.0032). Bacilli (taxonomic level: class) was lower in cases compared to inpatient and community controls (log LDA score 4.82, P = 0.0055), which was accounted for by lower Lactobacillales (order). The class Actinobacteria was higher in community controls than cases and inpatient controls (LDA score 4.47, P = 0.00076). Specifically, this difference was due to Bifidobacterium (genus) (log LDA score 4.24, P = 0.021). Community controls also had higher abundances of Clostridium hathewayi, Enterobacter cloaceae and Akkermansia muciniphila, but these were at rare abundance levels.

Conclusion

NP biodiversity is lower in children with asthma exacerbations than community controls. Our results also show high abundance of virus-matched reads in metagenome of most NP samples.

Acknowledgements

Funded by Research Committee’s One-off Fund for Research (3132910) of CUHK

O12

A precision medicine trial to study heterogeneity in pediatric asthma: design of the PUFFIN trial

Elise M. A. Slob1*, Susanne J. H. Vijverberg1, Mariëlle W. Pijnenburg2, Gerard H. Koppelman3, Anke-Hilse Maitland - van der Zee1

Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; 2 Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; 3 University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands

Correspondence: Elise M. A. Slob - e.m.slob@amc.nl

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):O12

Introduction

There is large heterogeneity in treatment response to asthma medication and a one-size fits all approach based on current guidelines might not fit all children with asthma. It is expected that children with one or more variant alleles (Arg16Arg and Arg16Gly) within the beta2 adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) gene coding for the beta2-receptor have a higher risk to poorly respond to long-acting beta2-agonists (LABA) comparing to the Gly16Gly wildtype [1, 2].

The aim is to study whether ADRB2 genotype-guided treatment will lead to improvement in asthma control in children with uncontrolled asthma on inhaled corticosteroids compared with usual care.

Methods

A multicentre, double-blind, precision medicine, randomized trial will be carried out within 15 Dutch hospitals. 310 asthmatic children (6–17 years of age) not well controlled on a low dose of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) will be included and randomized over a genotype-guided and a non-genotype-guided (control) arm. In the genotype-guided arm children with Arg16Arg and Arg16Gly will be treated with double dosages of ICS and with the Gly16Gly wildtype with add on LABA. In the control arm children will be randomized over both treatment options (Fig. 1). Lung function measurements, questionnaires focussing on asthma control (ACT/c-ACT) and quality of life, will be obtained in three visits within 6 months.
Fig. 1
Fig. 1

.

Results

The primary outcome will be improvement in asthma control based on repeated measurement analysis of c-ACT or ACT scores in the first 3 months of the trial. Additional cost effectiveness studies will be performed [3].

Conclusion

Currently, pharmacogenetics is not used in pediatric asthmas. This trial may pave the way to implement promising results for genotype-guided treatment in pediatric asthma in clinical practice.

References
  1. 1.

    Lipworth BJ, Basu K, Donald HP et al. Tailored second-line therapy in asthmatic children with the Arg (16) genotype. Clin. Sci. (Lond) 124(8), 521–528 (2013).

     
  2. 2.

    Turner S, Francis B, Vijverberg S et al. Childhood asthma exacerbations and the Arg16 beta2-receptor polymorphism: a meta-analysis stratified by treatment. J Allergy Clin. Immunol. 138(1), 107.e105–113.e105 (2016).

     
  3. 3.

    Vijverberg SJH, Pijnenburg MW, Hövels AM, Koppelman GH, Maitland-van der Zee AH. The need for precision medicine clinical trials in childhood asthma: rationale and design of the PUFFIN trial. Pharmacogenomics. 18(4), 393–401 (2017).

     
  4. 4.

    The PUFFIN trial is funded by the Lung Foundation Netherlands (projectnr: 5.1.16.094).

     

O13

Treatment of chronic urticaria in children—A cross-sectional analysis of specialized dermatological care in pediatric patients

Petra Staubach*, Sebastian Zimmer, Berenice Lang, Dennis Maeck, Anja Weber, Tom Gilfert, Max Jaeger, Adriane Peveling-Oberhag

Department of Dermatology, University Medical Center of Mainz, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Mainz, Germany

Correspondence: Petra Staubach - petra.staubach@unimedizin-mainz.de

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):O13

Introduction

Chronic urticaria (CU) is a common disease occuring in all ages. But CU in children has been devoted less attention so far. International management guidelines for pharmacotherapy in children derive largely from evidence in the adult.

Objective

To examine the clinical presentation, disease burden and pharmacological treatments in childhood to develop strategies for effective management of children with CU.

Methods

200 children (0–17 years, 57% females) with CU were included in a standardized extended diagnostic program in the specialized urticaria outpatient clinic, Department of Dermatology, University Medical Center Mainz, Germany from 2012 to 2015.

Results

The disease duration at time of presentation ranged from 2 months to 9 years. 62.5% presented with chronic spontaneous urticaria (CsU), 28% with chronic inducible urticaria, and 9.5% showed a combination. 15% of patients had not received any treatment. The majority (73%) were treated with second generation antihistamines (single dose) as monotherapy. Only 4 patients received an updosing (doubled recommended daily dose) as suggested by guidelines. 53% showed persisting symptoms despite therapy. Of these insufficiently treated patients 60% received single-dose second generation antihistamines without updosing. All eight patients (4%) on first generation antihistamines reported ongoing symptoms andalso all patients with additional montelukast treatment did not have full symptom control. Eleven patients (8.3%) received steroid pulse therapy in addition to antihistamines with consecutive symptom control in all cases.

Conclusion

The current data suggest a significant pharmacological undertreatment in children with CU. Although more than half of the patients were symptomatic under therapy with single-dose second generation antihistamines, no updosing or change of medication was performed. Treating physicians should be alerted to existing options of treatment escalation in pediatric CU and further investigations are urgently necessary to optimize the management of CU in children.

O14

Airborne spore allergens, air pollutants and socioeconomic status as risk factors for childhood allergic diseases in West Bengal, India

Partha Karak*, Kashinath Bhattacharya

Department of Botany, Environmental Biology Lab., Visva-Bharati (A Central University) Santiniketan - 731235, West Bengal, India

Correspondence: Partha Karak - parthakarak@rediffmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):O14

Introduction

Airborne allergens load vary from one climatic region to another. Moreover, synergistic effect of persistent exposure to aeroallergens in a particular set of climatic condition along with other parameters like socio-economic status, age group, air pollutants, etc., are major risk factors for childhood allergy. Hence an attempt has been made to find out such relationship among the childhood allergic diseases in West Bengal, India.

Methods

A total of 1536 pediatric subjects diagnosed as allergic patients at different sub- divisional Hospitals at Durgapur and Bolpur, West Bengal were thoroughly studied in presence of clinician with the help of ISAAC questionnaires. The prior ethical approval and written consent were taken from the patient’s guardians. A Burkard 7-day volumetric and an Andersen two-stage sampler were concurrently used for monitoring and assessment of airborne fungal spores. Skin prick tests were performed with 11 dominant fungal species as per EAACI guideline. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate the association between air pollutants, allergen exposure and the risk of allergic diseases with adjustments for potential confounders.

Results

Children with age group of 1–5 years showed higher prevalence in atopic dermatitis (15.79%), idiopathic urticaria (3.51%), cold and heat urticaria (3.75%), dermatographism (3.65%), chronic urticaria (14.4%), allergic contact dermatitis (3.51%), food allergy (3.51%), insect bite allergy (3.51%). While children among 6–19 years age group showed higher prevalence in allergic acute urticaria (23.19%), cough (60.14%), asthma (37.68%), allergic rhinitis (27.90%), rhinosinitis (2.17%), chronic allergic conjunctivitis (20.29%), mite allergy (2.54%), etc. The synergistic effects of pollution, fungal spore load and meteorological factors showed an increase in asthma severity 2.441(1.60–3.70), allergic conjunctivitis 0.277(0.145–0.529), rhinosinitis 3.453(1.44–8.28) and chronic urticaria 0.267(0.129–0.55). A clinically significant association of fungal spores with allergic symptoms were observed such as Penicillium oxalicum with asthma, Aspergillus flavus with allergic urticaria, and Aspergillus tenuis with rhinitis.

Conclusion

Our findings are in line with the perception of increase in the occurrence of atopic dermatitis, cough, asthma or conjunctivitis among children in the study area. Children below 10 years age were severely affected with at least one or more allergic symptoms. In general, girl child showed more sensitivity than boys. The lower economy class people are more vulnerable to atopic dermatitis perhaps due to their ignorance about sanity and poor nourishment.

O15

Effects of a swimming training session on skin barrier function in elite athletes

Ana Rodolfo1*, Inês Paciência2, Tiago Rama1, Leonor Leão1, Diana Silva3, João Rufo2, Francisca Mendes4, Patrícia Padrão5, Eduardo de Oliveira Fernandes6, Pedro Moreira7, Luís Delgado8, André Moreira8

1Centro Hospitalar de São João, Porto, Portugal; 2Faculdade de Medicina; Instituto de Saúde Pública, Inegi, Porto, Portugal; 3Centro Hospitalar de São João; Serviço e Laboratório de Imunologia, Faculdade de, Porto, Portugal; 4Serviço e Laboratório de Imunologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Porto, Portugal; 5Instituto de Saúde Pública; Faculdade de Ciências da Nutrição e Alimenta, Porto, Portugal; 6Institute of Science and Innovation in Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Management (Inegi), Porto, Portugal; 7Faculdade de Ciências da Nutrição e Alimentação da Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal; 8Centro Hospitalar de São João; Faculdade de Medicina; Instituto de Saúde Pública, Porto, Portugal

Correspondence: Ana Rodolfo - aipre@hotmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):O15

Introduction

The benefits of swimming on asthma have been extensively accessed. However, exposure to chlorine by-products and other potentially irritating chemicals in swimming pools have been correlated with perceived health problems in swimmers, namely skin irritation that may lead to the interruption of this practice. This study aimed to evaluate, in elite swimmers, whether skin barrier function, as measured by transepidermal water loss (TEWL), is affected by a training session.

Methods

Elite swimmers enrolled in the SWAN trial—Swimming Pool Environment Impact on the Human Respiratory Health (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03017976) were invited to participate. Due to the lack of prior information it was not possible to calculate the sample size and all athletes that provided informed consent were included in the analysis (n = 33, 23 females, aged 12–21 years). None of the participants used emollients. TEWL was measured using the Tewameter® TM 300 (Courage and Khazaka, Germany) in an environmentally controlled room, before, immediately after, and 30 min after a 2 h training session. The probe was held on the dorsum of hand, the volar forearm and the antecubital flexure for approximately 60 s each, or until a steady TEWL value was achieved. The average of two consecutive measurements was recorded. Non-parametric statistics were used as appropriate. Ethical approval was obtained from the University Clinical Research Ethics Committee.

Results

TEWL was independent of gender and allergic sensitization according with the Mann–Whitney U Test findings. A Friedman test revealed a significant effect of swimming on TEWL of dorsum of hand (X2(1) = 31.6; p < 0.001), volar forearm (X2(1) = 43.3.6; p < 0.001) and antecubital flexure (X2 1) = 41.9; p < 0.001). Pairwise analysis for volar forearm and antecubital flexure showed a significant increase of the TEWL (all p < 0.001) in both measurements after training in comparison to baseline and between immediately and 30` after swimming. For the dorsum of hand, although significantly increased from baseline (p < 0.001), no significant differences between immediately and 30’ after swimming were seen.

Conclusion

In conclusion, TEWL increases significantly after a single swimming training session in elite swimmers. The clinical significance of this is findings and potential long term effect in skin barrier function is unclear and requires further investigation.

Aknowledgements

Authors gratefully acknowledge the funding of Project NORTE-01-0145-FEDER-000010–Health, Comfort and Energy in the Built Environment (HEBE), cofinanced by Programa Operacional Regional do Norte (NORTE2020), through Fundo Europeu de Desenvolvimento Regional (FEDER).

O16

Pediatric chronic urticaria: epidemiology of utility of basophil activation test

Carmen Riggioni1*, Yadira Gordon1, Montserrat Alvaro-Lozano1, Mariona Pascal2 Monica Piquer1, Jaime Lozano1, Olga Dominguez1, Maria Teresa Giner1, Rosa Jimenez-Feijoo1, Adriana Machinena1, Mar Folque1, Marcia Dias1, Ana Maria Plaza1

1Hospital Sant Joan De Deu, Barcelona, Spain; 2Hospital Clinic, Barcelona, Spain

Correspondence: Carmen Riggioni - criggioni@hotmail.es

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):O16

Introduction

Chronic urticaria (CU) is a mast-cell and basophil driven disease, but cell activating signals are ill-defined and heterogeneous. There is limited evidence of CU in children. Objective: To evaluate the clinical features, possible causes, associated findings and laboratory results of CU in a pediatric population.

Methods

Prospective observational study in the Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology Department at Sant Joan de Déu Hospital, Barcelona, Spain. From April 2015 to 2017. The following data were recorded: age of onset, sex, duration and severity of symptoms, triggering factors, comorbidities, personal/family history, diagnostic tests and laboratory including basophil activation test (BAT) with autologous serum.

Results

A total of 52 patients were diagnosed with CU, females 59.6%, median (M) age 8 years (1–14). Personal and family history of atopy in21.6 and 36.5% respectively. Personal and family history of autoimmune disease were both 9.8%. The duration of urticaria was M 24 months (range 3–144). AM of 97 days with active disease per year was recorded after initial diagnosis, ranging from 3 months to daily throughout the year. According to EAACI guidelines, treatment was on step-1 (single dose antihistamines) in 59.6%, on step-2 (increased dose of antihistamines) 26.9%, and on step-3 (omalizumab or cyclosporine) 13.5%.

With regards to the subtypes of CU, spontaneous (73.1%) was more common than inducible (26.9%). Causes of induced CU were: symptomatic dermographism 11.5%, cold 9.6%, exercise 1.9% and heat 3.9%. After induced causes were excluded, laboratory tests were performed confirming infectious etiology in 11.5%. and autoinmune disease in 9.6%.

No possible cause was identified in 50% of patients. To these, BAT was performed in the 21 patients with active disease, 42.9% were positive. There were no significant statistical differences between BAT results regarding sex, age of onset, duration or treatment used. However, patients with positive BAT had a significantly higher number of active symptoms in days/year (p = 0.001). Patients with positive TAB had aM of 190 symptomatic days/year (100–365) vs. 102 (47–132) in the negative TAB group.

Conclusions

Chronic urticaria in our pediatric population was found to have a diverse etiology. In most cases of non-inducible urticaria, an infectious etiology could be established.

The exclusion of inducible urticaria, combining a thorough clinical history with according diagnostic tests, prevents the need to perform unnecessary tests in these children.

Children with chronic spontaneous urticaria who had a positive basophil activation test, had more symptomatic days/year therefore could need a more continuous clinical follow-up.

Figure: CU

O18

Innate immune activation in food reactions in infants with Food Protein Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome

Sam Mehr1, Eric Lee1,2, Peter Hsu1,2, Denise Anderson3, Emma de Jong3, Anthony Bosco3, Dianne E. Campbell1,2*

1Department of Allergy and Immunology, Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, Australia; 2Child and Adolescent Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; 3Centre for Biostatistics, Telethon Kids Institute, Perth, Australia

Correspondence: E. Campbell - diannec3@chw.edu.au

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):O18

Introduction

FPIES is a non-IgE-mediated food allergy, with a characteristic clinical presentation in early infancy, and a tendency for remission in early childhood. The immune-pathophysiology of the disorder is unclear. Recent reports from Japan and the US have variably reported elevated C-reactive protein, neutrophilia, T cell activation and evidence of innate immune activation.

Methods

Infants with a history of FPIES, who met international criteria for diagnosis (1), were invited to undergo an observed oral food challenge to the trigger food or foods from 6 months following the last known clinical episode. Blood samples were collected immediately prior to the challenge and at the onset of a reaction, or at the end of a non-reactive challenge. Each subject included in the study had a paired pre and post challenge sample obtained. Samples were collected prior to any treatment (such as Ondansetron and IV fluids)—or as soon as possible after treatment. Infants were deemed reactive on challenge according to published criteria (2).

Total RNA was isolated from whole blood, and gene expression patterns were profiled by RNA-Seq. Gene network patterns induced by the challenge were compared and contrasted in reactors and non-reactors, and upstream regulator analysis was employed to unveil network driver genes.

Results

Paired samples from 36 infants who met inclusion criteria undergoing food challenge were obtained (median age 18 months). 26 infants were tolerant to the food challenge and 10 infants reacted on challenge. Trigger foods included rice (n = 12), cow’s milk (n = 11), egg and meats (n = 9), soy (n = 1), fish (n = 1). Other grains (n = 1) and fruit (n = 1).

198 differentially expressed genes were identified between samples from reactors and non-reactors on food challenge (with a fold change > 1.5, FDR < 0.05). Biological pathways upregulated in food reaction responses included granulocyte adhesion and diapedesis and TREM1 signalling. Network analysis revealed that an innate inflammatory module was upregulated in the responses from reactors, and upstream regulator analysis suggested that the responses were driven by TNF, CFS2 and 3, IL-13, CEBPA, IL-1B, IL-6, TGF-B1 and IFNG.

Conclusion

Our results support the proposition that FPIES and food reactions in FPIES are underpinned by activation of the innate immune system. Further scrutiny of the molecular drivers of this response and a more detailed analysis of the response dynamics is underway.

References
  1. 1.

    1. Nowak-Węgrzyn A, et al. International Consensus Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome. JACI 2017; In Press.

     
  2. 2.

    Lee E et al. Resolution of acute food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome in children. JACI-IP. 2017;5(2):486–8.

     

O19

Predictive factors of severe allergy to cashew nut in children

Clémence Delahaye1, Fabien Pelletier2, Amandine Luc3, Pascale Dumond2, Cyril Schweitzer4, Etienne Beaudouin5, Amandine Chauveau1*

1Pediatric Allergy Department, Children’s Hospital, University Hospital of Nancy, Vandoeuvre les Nancy, France; 2Dermatology department, University Hospital of Besançon, Besançon, France; 3ESPRI-BIOBASE Unit-Parc, University Hospital of Nancy, Vandoeuvre les Nancy, France; 4Department of Pediatric Lung Function Testing, Children’s Hospital, University Hospital of Nancy; EA 3450 DevAH-Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Lorraine, Vandoeuvre les Nancy, France; 5Allergy Department, Regional Hospital Emile Durkheim, Epinal, France

Correspondence: Amandine Chauveau - a.chauveau@chru-nancy.fr

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):O19

Introduction

The prevalence of cashew nut allergy seems to increase and affects young children. Cashew nut consumption by allergic patients can cause severe reactions, maybe even more severe than peanut consumption does. However, there are no studies on severity criteria for this allergy. The aim of our study is to identify predictive factors of severe allergy to cashew nut in children.

Methods

All children who underwent an oral food challenge (OFC) to cashew nut with a positive outcome at the Pediatric Allergy Department of the University Hospital of Nancy between November 2013 and October 2016 were included. The severity of allergic reactions to OFC was analyzed according to 3 criteria: clinical symptoms according to the Astier’s classification, threshold dose and a score combining clinical symptoms and threshold dose. Predictive factors of severe allergy were analyzed by multivariate regression.

Results

Among the 94 children with a positive OFC to cashew nut, 31.9% had a history of allergic reaction to cashew nut, 47.9% were asthmatic and 63.8% had at least one other food allergy. The absence of previous allergic reaction to cashew nut (that is to say a sensitization to cashew nut discovered during an allergy testing for another food allergy) and the presence of asthma were associated to anaphylaxis during the OFC (respectively OR = 2.8 [1.1–7.3] and 2.8 [1.2–6.6]). Female gender and size of the skin prick-test to raw cashew nut superior or equal to 8 mm were associated to a low threshold dose (respectively OR = 7.5 [2.0–27.9] and 11.6 [2.6–52.2]). According to the score combining symptoms and threshold dose, only the size of the skin prick-test to raw cashew nut (≥ 8 mm) was a predictive factor of severe allergic reaction (OR = 2, 8 [1, 1–7, 3]).

Conclusion

Absence of previous allergic reaction to cashew nut, asthma, femalegender and a skin prick-test to raw cashew nut superior or equal to 8 mm seem to be predictive factors of severe allergy to cashew nut in children.

O20

High prevalence of primary eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders in children who have received food oral immunotherapy

Sara Bellón1*, Laura Sánchez1, Cristina Muñoz2, Teresa Bracamonte1, Sonia Fernández3, Sergio Quevedo1, Ana Rayo2, Luis Á. Echeverría1

1Pediatric Allergy Unit, Severo Ochoa University Hospital, Leganés, Spain; 2Pediatric Allergy Unit, Villalba General Hospital, Villalba, Spain; 3Pediatric Gastroenterology Unit, Severo Ochoa University Hospital, Leganés, Spain

Correspondence: Sara Bellón - sara.bellon.alonso@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):O20

Introduction

Recently, the relationship between Primary eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders (PEGDs) and Food oral immunotherapy (OIT) has been described but large prospective studies are needed to assess the true incidence of PEGDs in this sensitive group of patients.

Methods

This is a prospective study in children with milk and/or egg allergy who has been subjected to OIT with these foods during the last 10 years (2006–2016). In all these patients, strict monitoring of new gastrointestinal signs was carried out during both the initial dose escalation phase and the maintenance one.

When patients presented persistent gastrointestinal symptoms during the OIT they were evaluated by our Pediatric Gastroenterology Unit and a digestive endoscopy with biopsy specimens was performed if PEGDs was suspected.

Results

In the period 2006–2016, the OIT protocol was applied in 108 cases with cow's milk and 39 cases with egg in our Pediatric Allergy Unit.

In that period, PEGDs were diagnosed in eleven of the 147 global cases of OIT representing 6.8% of the sample (case 8 is not included in prevalence rate because OIT was performed in other centre). A 72% of the patients were males between 3 and 14 years of age.

Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) was diagnosed in nine patients with exclusively oesophageal involvement, while the other two patients were diagnosed with Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis (EoGE) (one with oesophageal and duodenal disease and the other with oesophageal and colon involvement).

Eight of the affected patients had undergone OIT with cow’s milk, two with egg, and one with both foods.

The median time of development of PEGDs after OIT in our patients were 25.7 months (0 months–5 years). The most common initial symptom was abdominal pain (in seven of the eleven cases), followed by vomiting (in six cases) and dysphagia (in five cases).

Eight patients had a good clinical response to the treatment with proton pump inhibitors with or without swallowed corticosteroids, and only three required OIT discontinuation to control the symptoms.

All these results are more specifically showed in Table 1.
Table 1

Case summary

Conclusion: In our series, the prevalence of PEGDs in patients who have undergone food OIT is 6.8%, that is considerably higher than other studies published to the date. These may be due to the correct and prolonged patient gastrointestinal follow-up.

In our experience, the decision to eliminate the food from OIT should be made on an individual basis, depending on the severity of the condition, the symptoms, evolution and response to other possible treatment alternatives.

O21

Caesarean delivery, preterm birth and association with food allergy in children—Swedish nationwide cohort study of 1 million children

Niki Mitselou1*, Olof Stephansson3, Jenny Hallberg4,5,6, Erik Melén4,5, Jonas F Ludvigsson1,7

1Department of Pediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; 2Department of Medicine, Solna, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; 3Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; 4Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; 5Sachs’ Children’s Hospital, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; 6Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; 7Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden

Correspondence: Niki Mitselou - nikimitselou@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):O21

Introduction

With the exception of heredity and concurrent atopic disease, there are few known risk factors for food allergy in children. We examined the influence of preterm birth, caesarean delivery, low birth weight and intrauterine growth restriction on the risk of food allergy in the offspring.

Methods

A nationwide Swedish longitudinal cohort study. We examined 1,086,378 children born in Sweden between 2001 and 2012 using prospectively recorded data from the Swedish Medical Birth Registry and the Patient Registry.

Cox regression estimated Hazard ratios (HRs) for food allergy adjusting for sex, birth weight, gestational age, caesarean delivery, and maternal factors such as country of birth, body mass index, age, smoking, asthma/pulmonary disease, and parity.

Results

During follow-up, 26,732 children developed food allergy; of these, 14,534 had at least two Hospital-based diagnoses of food allergy (54.4%). Food allergy was positively associated with caesarean delivery (HR = 1.21; 95% CI = 1.18–1.25) but negatively associated with very preterm birth (HR = 0.74; 95% CI = 0.56–0.98). None of the other exposures could be linked to food allergy. Risk estimates were similar when we restricted our outcome to two diagnoses with food allergy, and did not change with follow-up time (5 years or later: HR for food allergy in children with caesarean delivery = 1.21; 95% CI = 1.12–1.30, and HR for food allergy after very preterm birth = 0.74; 95% CI = 0.38–1.43). There was no difference between boys and girls.

In 100,000 children undergoing caesarean delivery, an extra 78 developed later food allergy compared to the reference group.

Conclusions

This study suggests that caesarean delivery increases the risk of food allergy, while very preterm birth is associated with decreased risk of later food allergy.

O22

A prospective cross sectional audit of growth parameters of pediatric patients attending food allergy dietetic clinics

Carol Fudge1, Kate E. Grimshaw1,2*, Mark Alderton3, Emma Grainger-Allen3, Mich Erlewyn-Lajeunesse3, Luise V. Marino1

1Department of Nutrition, Dietetics and Speech and Language Therapy, Southampton Children’s Hospital, Southampton, United Kingdom; 2Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Southampton University, Southampton, United Kingdom; 3Pediatric Allergy Team, Southampton Children’s Hospital, Southampton, United Kingdom

Correspondence: Kate E. Grimshaw - kate.grimshaw@uhs.nhs.uk

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):O22

Introduction

The management of allergic reactions involves the exclusion of foods from the diet, predisposing allergic infants/children to inadequate nutritional intake, poor growth and malnutrition. This in turn increases the risk of associated poor developmental and socioeconomic outcomes (e.g. neuro developmental outcomes, increased all-cause mortality in adulthood, reduced scholastic ability, work productivity and lost future earnings). Poor growth and malnutrition has been previously described in food allergic children in the UK [1].

This audit aimed to describe the growth and allergic profile of children seen in the pediatric allergy clinics at Southampton Children’s Hospital.

Methods

Between 1st April and 30th September 2016 prospective, cross sectional anthropometric and clinical data were collected from food allergic children attending 4 of the 5 pediatric allergy dietetic clinics held at Southampton Children’s Hospital. These patients represented referrals from primary, secondary and tertiary services. Serial data was not collected for patients seen more than once within the 6 months period. Data was entered into an access database designed for the purpose and were analysed using SPSS version 17.

Results

236 children with IgE and non IgE mediated allergies were included. More females were seen than males with ages ranging from 3 to 177 months (mean 25.0) (Table 1).
Table 1

Characteristics of children included in Audit

 

All

IgE mediated

Non IgE mediated

New referral

Review

Mean age in months

25.04

28.2

21.24

22.63

27.6

Male gender

106

34

76

54

51

New referral

121

42

84

Three or more food allergies

53

38

32

22

31

Mean weight Z

0.2012

0.1674

0.2076

0.1849

0.21

Mean height Z

− 0.0872

− 0.1670

− 0.0730

− 0.1514

− 0.0247

The numbers of diagnosed food allergy ranged from 1 (n = 123) to 7 (n = 3), the most common being Cow’s milk (91.5%)followed by hens egg, soya, peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, fish, sesame, oats, lupin, corn, kiwi and legumes.

1.3% of children seen had wasting (weight for height ≤ − 2 z scores) and 5.9% had stunting (height for age ≤ − 2 z scores). The rate for low height for age z scores (HAZ) was higher for new referrals (8.3%) than for follow ups (3.5%) (p = 0.097 (ns)), indicating a significant improvement in HAZ score following dietetic intervention. There was a trend for HAZ < − 2 scores to be associated with having 4 or more food allergies (p = 0.079 (ns)). Children with Non IgE milk allergy (new/review) had the highest rates of low HAZ score at 7.7%.

Conclusion

Although growth problems are not a major issue in our food allergy population, the cross sectional prevalence of stunting for new referrals to the dietetic allergy service was slightly higher than would be expected within a population standard of around 5% [2] and was highest amongst children with Non IgE mediated milk allergy. Growth status improved upon dietetic intervention.

References
  1. 1.

    Meyer R, De KC, Dziubak R, Venter C, Dominguez-Ortega G, Cutts R, et al. Malnutrition in children with food allergies in the UK. J Hum Nutr Diet. 2013.

     
  2. 2.

    World Health Organisation. Global database on Child growth and malnutritioni: Child growth indicators and their interpretation. World Health Organisation 2012

     

O23

Food allergy at 12 years of age in western Sweden—Risk factors and protective factors

Ivar Orn Clausen1*, Emma Goksor2, Bernt Alm2, Goran Wennergren2

1Department of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland; 2Department of Pediatrics, University of Gothenburg, Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden

Correspondence: Ivar Orn Clausen - ioc1@hi.is

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):O23

Introduction

The prevalence of allergy has increased in the western world over the last decades. Multiple factors have been identified as increasing and reducing the risk. Rural living has been associated with less risk of allergic disease, in line with the hygiene hypothesis.

The goal of this study was to estimate possible risk factors and protective factors for food allergy in 12-year-old children living in western Sweden.

Methods

The data was obtained from a prospective, longitudinal cohort study in western Sweden. Questionnaires were sent out when the children were 6 months, 1, 4.5, 8 and 12 years of age. Additional information was received from the Swedish Medical Birth Register. Children with possible food allergy and probable food allergy were identified and allocated into two groups for further examination. Possible food allergy was defined as those who reported both doctor diagnosed food allergy and symptoms of food allergy in the last 12 months. Probable food allergy was defined as those with reported doctor diagnosed food allergy, symptoms of food allergy as well as reported sensitization to the food they reported symptoms from. Early risk and protective factors were identified and evaluated.

Results

A total of 3637 families answered the questionnaires distributed at 12 years and thus the response rate was 76.1% (3637/4777). Of these, 52.4% (1895) were boys. The prevalence of possible food allergy was 6.4% (n = 230) and of probable food allergy was 3.0% (n = 110). In a multivariate analysis, heredity for atopic diseases (adjusted OR (aOR) 1.8; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1–2.8) and early eczema (aOR 4.0; 2.7–6.1) were independent risk factors for probable food allergy.

Rural living at 6 months of age (aOR 0.45; 0.24–0.83) and fish consumption more than once a month at 1 year (aOR 0.47; 0.25–0.87) decreased the risk of probable food allergy at 12 years, independently of heredity and socioeconomic factors.

Conclusion

In our study, we show that rural living at 6 months of age and fish consumption more than once a month at 1 year of age, reduce the risk of having food allergy at 12 year of age and that heredity and early eczema are independent risk factors.

O24

Using clinical decision support to promote prevention of peanut allergy guideline adherence: a US pilot project

Lucy Bilaver1*, Monika Martusiewicz2, James Shea2, Lauren Kao1, Matthew Davis1,2, Ruchi Gupta1,2

1Department of Pediatrics, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, United States of America; 2Lurie Children’s Hospital, Chicago, IL, United States of America

Correspondence: Lucy Bilaver - l-bilaver@northwestern.edu

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):O24

Introduction

The groundbreaking Learning Early About Peanut allergy (LEAP) trial demonstrated that early introduction of peanut products into the diet of high risk infants 4–11 months old reduced the subsequent incidence of PA in early childhood by 81% [1]. Consequently, in 2017 the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease coordinated the publication of The Addendum guidelines for the prevention of peanut allergy in the United States [2] [“Prevention of Peanut Allergy (PPA) guidelines”], recommending dietary introduction of peanut products during infancy. The new PPA guidelines present an immediate clinical challenge for pediatricians to assess risk by identifying infants with severe eczema and/or egg allergy and subsequently test, refer, and/or counsel caregivers. Clinical decision support (CDS) tools integrated within electronic health record (EHR) systems is an evidenced-based approach to facilitate adherence to clinical guidelines. The objective of this project was to assess adherence to PPA guidelines using a CDS recently implemented in one large, US pediatric residency clinic and to validate the pediatrician’s interpretation of high risk infants.

Methods

We analyzed data for 51 infants seen for 4, 6, and 9 month well-child visits between June 7, 2017 and August 21, 2017. Data was pulled from an EHR that had implemented a CDS to support PPA guideline adherence. The CDS included best practice advisory, order sets, and additions to the note template around evaluation of risk status and anticipatory guidance. Chart review was conducted by trained pediatric residents to validate risk categorization.

Results

Of the 51 infants seen for well-child visits during the observation period the best practice advisory was triggered for 11 infants (21.6%). Pediatricians identified two infants with severe eczema, 38 with neither severe eczema no egg allergy, and 11 were left unidentified. Adherence to the guidelines was 66% among infants with no risk factors and 100% among those with severe eczema. Chart review revealed that the two infants (3.9%) identified with severe eczema were prescribed topical corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors; however, another eight infants (15.7%) were also prescribed topical corticosteroids or calcineurin inhibitors but were identified as having mild or moderate eczema by the pediatrician.

Conclusion

Clinical decision support was an effective method to promote PPA guideline adherence. Clinical judgement was an important factor in identifying infants at high risk for peanut allergy as use of prescription medications alone did not discriminate between those with severe versus mild to moderate eczema.

References
  1. 1.

    Du Toit G, Roberts G, Sayre PH, Bahnson HT, Radulovic S, Santos AF, et al. Randomized trial of peanut consumption in infants at risk for peanut allergy. N Engl J Med. 2015;372(9):803–1310.1056/NEJMoa1414850.

     
  2. 2.

    Togias A, Cooper SF, Acebal ML, Assa’ad A, Baker JR, Jr., Beck LA, et al. Addendum guidelines for the prevention of peanut allergy in the United States: Report of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases-sponsored expert panel. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2017;139(1):29–4410.1016/j.jaci.2016.10.010.

     

D2

Quality of life improves in children with persistent egg allergy after oral immunotherapy with egg

Sonia Vázquez-Cortés*, Guadalupe Marco-Martín, Inmaculada Cerecedo, Mónica Rodríguez-Álvarez, Victoria Fuentes-Aparicio, Ximena Larco-Rojas, Montserrat Fernández-Rivas

Allergy Department, Hospital Clinico San Carlos IdISSC, Madrid, Spain

Correspondence: Sonia Vázquez-Cortés - sonia.vazquez.cortes@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D2

Introduction

Food allergy compromises patient's quality of life (QoL). Oral immunotherapy (OIT) is effective in patients with persistent food allergy.

The objective of this study is to evaluate if OIT modifies QoL in children from 8 to 12 years of age with persistent egg allergy.

Methods

We performed a prospective cohort study in patients with persistent egg allergy included in our protocol of egg oral immunotherapy. We analyzed data of 18 patients aged between 8 and 12 years that completed the Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire (FAQLQ) and the Food Allergy Independent Measure (FAIM) before starting the OIT (v1), after 6 months (v2) and 12 months after (v3) finishing the OIT.

Statistical analyses were carried out with nonparametric matched-pair methods (Wilcoxon and Kendall) using Stata.

Results

50% of patients were female and 61% suffered from other food allergies, most of them to tree nuts (81.8%).

We found an improvement trend in FAQLQ score statistically significant since v6 onward (p = 0.004). We observed a decrease in FAQLQ score in v2 and v3, statistically significant (v2: 0.956 points p = 0.03; v3: 1.58 points, p = 0.02). In the domain analysis, we observed a score decrease, all of them clinically relevant (>=0.5 points) and statistically significant at 1 year (p < 0.05), except in the Dietary Restrictions domain, where we did not find this statistical significance, although the decrease was clinically relevant.

Regarding FAIM, we found a slight increase in v6 (0.17 points, p > 0.05). At v12 we observed a decrease in score statistically significant (0.417 points, p = 0.03).

Conclusion

OIT improves QoL in children between 8 and 12 years of age with egg allergy, even those suffering from allergy to other food.

D3

“Are we there yet?”: choosing the best time to offer baked milk and egg challenges to milk and egg allergic children

Nikita Ohayon*, Shalini Thiruvarudchelvam, Jason Ohayon

Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

Correspondence: Nikita Ohayon - nsohayon@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D3

Introduction

The option of baked milk (BM) and baked egg (BE) challenges allow for desensitization in milk and egg allergic children, respectively. Serum specific IgE (sIgE) measurements to milk (< 10 kU/L) and egg (< 5kU/L) have been suggested as guides in selecting children for desensitization.

Methods

Retrospective chart review was performed in a community Allergy clinic on children who participated in BM and BE oral challenges. Data on demographics, allergic measurements and outcome of oral challenges was collected. Data on milk and egg allergic children who were not selected for oral challenge was collected for comparison.

Results

Forty five children with milk allergy were identified over a 40 month period (Jan 2014 to Apr 2017). Average age at diagnosis was 15 months. Thirty-two of 45 children were male (71%). Average skin (STz) size at diagnosis was 5.8 mm to milk. BM challenges were offered to 25/45 (56%). Average time from diagnosis of milk allergy to BM challenge was 38 months. At challenge date, average STz was 6.7 mm with average sIgE of 3.29 kU/l for milk and 2.52 kU/L for casein. Twenty-one of 22 (95%) children passed their BM challenge. Twenty of 45 (44%) were not challenged, based on their average STz of 9.2 mm and sIgE to milk 29.6 kU/L and casein 38.16.

Fifty-three children with egg allergy were identified over the same time period. Average age at diagnosis was 13 months. Average STz at diagnosis was 6.9 mm for egg white (EW). Twenty-five of 53 children (47%) were offered BE oral challenge. Average time from diagnosis to BE challenge was 37 months. At challenge date, average STz was 5 mm for EW and sIgE was 0.7 kU/L. Twenty-three of 25 (92%) children passed. Twenty-eight of 53 (53%) were not challenged based on average STz of 8.1 mm and sIgE 27.9 to EW.

Conclusions

BM and BE challenges were safe in milk and egg allergic children respectively after an average of 2.5 years from time of diagnosis. Children chosen for challenge were within suggested sIgE cutoff levels. STz in the “passed” milk challenge group was not different to non-challenged group. The high rate of successful challenges to both milk and egg, suggests that the sIgE levels chosen may be too low. Children in the non-selected group may therefore be included sooner for BM/BE challenges.

D4

Pediatric anaphylaxis in a food allergy consultation

Rosa-Anita Fernandes*, Emília Faria, Celso Pereira, Ana Todo-Bom, Isabel Carrapatoso

Coimbra University Hospital, Coimbra, Portugal

Correspondence: Rosa-Anita Fernandes - rosa.anita.fernandes@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D4

Introduction

Anaphylaxis is a potentially fatal allergic reaction and its prevalence has been increasing. Food allergy is the commonest cause of anaphylaxis in children, especially in preschool age. The aim of this study was to characterize the pediatric population with food induced anaphylaxis followed in our Food Allergy outpatient department (FAOD) over a 16 months period.

Methods

Retrospective analyses of medical charts and electronic records of all children and adolescents with food-related anaphylaxis observed in our FAOD from January 2016 to April 2017. Patients were categorize into clusters according to the culprit food in the first anaphylactic episode.

Results

35 patients were included, 20 male and 15 female. The mean age was 5.8, the earliest anaphylaxis was at 14 days old (cow’s milk) and the majority of reactions were with cow’s milk (n = 9), egg (n = 6) and fish (n = 6). Reactions to milk were more common in infants (88%). Egg allergy was more frequent in pre-school and school-age children. In adolescents, no specific allergy pattern was found. Peanut was the culprit food in only 1 patient that also reported symptoms with fresh fruits and was sensitized to Pru p 3. Multiple combinations of symptoms were observed, the most frequent were urticaria (82.9%), angioedema (57%) and respiratory symptoms (62.9%). Thirty-one patients were observed in the emergency department during anaphylaxis, but few (n = 6) were treated with epinephrine. Most of the patients were atopic (86%) and asthma and/or rhinitis were the more frequent comorbidities. Only 3 patients had symptoms with other foods. The presence of cofactors was observed in only 1 patient, a 16-year-old male, sensitized to Pru p 3, with exercise-induced anaphylaxis to apple.

Conclusion

In our pediatric population, the main triggering agent of food-dependent anaphylaxis in infants was milk and egg, as reported in previous studies. Differing from other studies, the prevalence of reactions due to peanut was low. Atopy was present in almost all patients. Epinephrine is underused, as reported by others, which represents an important risk of more severe reaction in this age group.

D5

Review of oral food challenge tests in children

Belén García Avilés1*, Nuria Marco Lozano2, Teresa Toral Pérez3, Luis Moral Gil3, Cristina Montahud Posada 4, María Caballero Caballero4, Patricia Martínez Rovira1, Teresa Atienza Almarcha1, Mª José Forniés Arnáu5, Cristina González Toro5, Jesús Garde Garde6

1Hospital Clínico Universitario de San Juan de Alicante, Spain; 2Hospital Vega Baja de Orihuela, Spain; 3Hospital General Universitario de Alicante, Spain; 4Hospital Universitario del Vinalopó de Elche, Spain; 5Hospital General Universitario de Elda, Spain; 6Hospital General Universitario de Elche, Spain

Correspondence: Belén García Avilés - bgarciaviles@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D5

Introduction

The objective of our study, is to analyze the results of oral food challenge tests (OFCT) in children

Methods

Retrospective review of OFCT performed in pediatric patients in 6 Hospitals during the years 2014–2015. Patient-related data, clinical history, and test results were collected. Data were analyzed using the SPSS 17.0 program.

Results

756 OFCT performed in 548 patients (61%males, median age 4 years, mode 1 year). Foods most frequently tested: egg (34%), nuts (23%), cow’s milk (17%) and fish (9%). OFCT were positive (onset of allergy symptoms) in 167 patients (22%), negative in 576 (76%) and inconclusive in 13 (2%). Tests were more frequently positive (p < 0.05) for egg, walnut, and in patients with higher levels of specific IgE, with a history of gastrointestinal allergy symptoms or with atopic dermatitis and approached significance for milk (p = 0.063) or in patients reporting a history of anaphylaxis (P = 0.094). OFCT were significantly less positive for almonds or with foods not previously consumed because sensitization was detected prior to introduction. Most frequent signs and symptoms in positive tests were cutaneous (68%), gastrointestinal (48%) and oral pruritus (31%). No treatment was required in 32% of the positive tests and adrenaline was administered in 10%; no one required Hospitalization.

Twenty patients presented anaphylaxis during the test, more frequently in those who had previous anaphylaxis (p = 0.01) and with walnuts (p = 0.068). A total of 183 OFCT were performed due to sensitization detected prior to the introduction of the food, always being negative with almond (p = 0.028) and positive more commonly with higher specific IgE (p = 0.008), atopic dermatitis (p = 0.076) or with egg (p = 0.082).

Conclusions

OFCT have an acceptable safety profile in our population, which reaffirms its irreplaceable usefulness in the study of pediatric patients with suspected or known food allergy. The high rate of positve tests should not be an impediment to its performance.

D6

Impact of diagnostic testing for food allergy on quality of life and health-related costs: a systematic review

Kansen Hannah M1*, Le Thuy-My2, Meijer Yolanda1, Knulst André C2, Van der Ent Cornelis1, K van Erp Francine1

1Wilhelmina Children’s Hospital, University Medical Center, Utrecht, Netherlands; 2University Medical Center, Utrecht, Netherlands

Correspondence: Kansen Hannah M - h.m.kansen-2@umcutrecht.nl

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D6

Introduction

There is increasing interest in using alternative diagnostic strategies for food allergy, thereby limiting the burden compared to double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges (DBPCFC). However, uncertainty remains regarding the impact of these tests on quality of life (QoL) and health-related costs. The current study aims to systematically review literature regarding this matter.

Methods

Electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, NIHR) were searched until January 2017. Studies were included if diagnostic testing was performed in patients with suspected food allergy and changes in either QoL or costs were reported. Validity was assessed using validated checklists for critical appraisal. Study selection and validity assessment were performed independently by two researchers.

Results

A total of 1.239 original references on QoL and 1.994 on costs were identified.

In all seven identified references on QoL, the diagnostic test under study was an oral food challenge. Two studies reported no substantial improvement in food-allergy related QoL following a food challenge. However, five references found significantly improved QoL in challenged patients compared to unchallenged irrespective of the outcome.

Four of seven identified studies on costs used a Markov model to investigate cost-effectiveness of diagnostics in patients with suspected peanut allergy. These models estimated that using sIgE to peanut components results in increased QoL and reduced costs compared to DBPCFC. Another study reported a 63% decrease in unnecessary elimination diets when sIgE to allergen components would be used in primary care. A prospective study reported that indirect socioeconomic costs decreased following DBPCFC in all patients, while direct costs increased in food allergic patients. Finally, one study constructed a model to assess budget impact of diagnosis and treatment of cow’s milk allergy in the Netherlands from the perspective of the health care insurers. Total annual costs of managing all new CMA sufferers expected in 1 year (n = 4382) were estimated at €11.3 million. Costs would increase substantially (by ~ €1.9 million) if DBPCFC would be performed in all patients.

Conclusion

sIgE to allergen components has the potential to be more cost-effective compared to DBPCFC, but valid data on the impact on QoL are lacking. The impact of food challenges on QoL varies across studies, probably explained by study heterogeneity. The present review indicates the need for a prospective study on the impact of (alternative) diagnostic testing on quality of life and costs in patients with food allergy, as all studies identified were considered of low to moderate validity.

D7

IgE-mediated allergy to baked and regular cow’s milk and egg: learning from oral food challenges

Natalia Cartledge*, Sophia Lazenby, Rachel De Boer, Susan Chan, Alexandra Santos

Children’s Allergy Service, Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospital, London, United Kingdom

Correspondence: Natalia Cartledge - Natalia.cartledge@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D7

Introduction

The majority of children with IgE-mediated cow’s milk and egg allergies tolerate baked milk and egg and outgrow their allergy over time. The primary aim of this study was to determine optimal identifiers of children who may be able to tolerate (baked and regular) milk or egg.

Methods

Medical records of oral food challenges (OFC) to baked and regular cow’s milk and hen’s egg performed over a 2-year period (Jan 2014-Dec 2015) in the Pediatric Allergy Department were reviewed. Demographic and clinical characteristics, results of skin prick test (SPT), specific IgE (sIgE) to milk and egg and OFC were recorded. Statistical analyses were performed using IBM SPSS v21.

Results

Following assessment in the Pediatric Allergy clinic, 126 children underwent OFC to milk (79 (73%) to baked and 47 (37%) to regular milk) and 177 children underwent OFC to egg (124 (70%) to baked and 53 (30%) to regular egg). Overall, 22 patients (15%) failed OFC to milk and 46 (26%) to egg. The majority of the reactions were mild; only 2 (1.6%)children who reacted to milk and 3 (1.7%) children who reacted to egg were treated with intramuscular adrenaline. There was no significant difference in the wheal size of SPT to fresh milk (p = 0.374, area under the ROC curve (AUC) = 0.419) between children who passed or failed OFC to baked or regular milk. Children who reacted to baked milk had a higher SPT to milk extract (p = 0.043, AUC = 0.698) and higher sIgE to milk (p = 0.015, AUC = 0.733). To predict reactivity to regular milk, sIgE (p = 0.012, AUC = 0.782) performed better than SPT to milk extract (p = 0.642, AUC = 0.434). Children who reacted to baked egg had higher SPT to egg extract (p = 0.044, AUC = 0.613) and to raw egg (p = 0.007, AUC = 0.659) and higher sIgE to egg white (p = 0.002, AUC = 0.741) than children who passed the OFC. To predict reactivity to regular egg, SPT to raw egg (p = 0.003, AUC = 0.883) performed better than SPT to egg extract (p = 0.223, AUC = 0.673) and than sIgE to egg white (p = 0.149, AUC = 0.761).

Conclusion

The majority of patients were referred for OFC to baked rather than regular milk and egg. Specific IgE was a better predictor of clinical reactivity to baked and regular milk and to baked egg than SPT. SPT to raw egg was the best predictor of reactivity to regular egg.

D8

Amino-acid based formula including synbiotics effectively modulates gut microbiota of non-IgE mediated Cow’s Milk Allergic infants

Harm Wopereis1*, Marleen T. J. van Ampting1, David C. A. Candy2, Diego Peroni3, Yvan Vandenplas4, Adam T. Fox5, Neil Shah6, Aysun C. Yavuz1, Lucien F. Harthoorn1, Louise J. Michaelis7, Jan Knol1, Christina E. West8

1Nutricia Research, Utrecht, The Netherlands; 2Royal Alexandra Children’s Hospital, Brighton, United Kingdom; 3University Hospital Verona, Verona, Italy; 4Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium; 5Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom; 6Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, United Kingdom; 7Great North Children’s Hospital, Newcastle upon, United Kingdom; 8Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden

Correspondence: Harm Wopereis - harm.wopereis@danone.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D8

Introduction

A healthy breastfed infant is characterized by optimal immune maturation and specific gut microbiota development [1]. Infants who suffer from severe cow’s milk allergy (CMA) often rely on cow’s milk protein avoidance and, when breastfeeding is not possible, on specialised infant formulas such as amino-acid based formulas (AAF). In this study, we investigated the gut microbiota development of infants with CMA receiving an AAF including specific prebiotic and probiotic ingredients (synbiotics).

Methods

In a prospective, randomized, double-blind controlled study (registered as NTR3979), full-term infants with suspected non-IgE mediated CMA received an AAF (control; n = 36) or an AAF including synbiotics specifically designed for dietary management of CMA (oligofructose, inulin, Bifidobacterium breve M-16 V) (test; n = 35) for 8 weeks (8w). Healthy breastfed infants, age-matched to CMA infants at 8w, were used as reference group. After 8w, CMA infants continued to use study product if advised by clinician. Microbial composition of faecal samples collected at baseline, 8w, 12w and 26w were analysed by 16S ribosomal-DNA sequencing and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Statistical analysis of sequencing data involved mixed models and the Principal Response Curves (PRC) technique to assess time-dependent treatment effects [2].

Results

At inclusion the mean age (± SD) of CMA infants (n = 71) was 6.00 ± 2.98 months. At 8w, there was no difference in gut microbial diversity between test and control group. In both groups diversity increased over time (from baseline until 26w) characterised by a more gradual increment in test compared to control (Shannon index, difference = − 0.026, P = 0.005). PRC analysis revealed that the gut microbial composition changed significantly over time in test vs. control (Monte Carlo Permutation Test, 1000 permutations, P = 0.001), which was driven by significantly increased relative abundances of Bifidobacterium spp. and Veillonella sp., and significantly decreased relative abundances of Alistipes sp. and several species within the family of Lachnospiraceae.

Conclusion

We showed that the AAF including specific synbiotics leads to a selective enhancement of Bifidobacterium spp. and decreased levels of species of Lachnospiraceae. These results confirm previously reported results by FISH quantification of both bacterial groups, which were shown for test to approximate the levels observed in the healthy breastfed reference group at the 8w primary endpoint [3]. Overall, these results show that the AAF including specific synbiotics effectively modulates the gut microbiota development of non-IgE mediated CMA infants to a more healthy profile.

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank the ASSIGN study group, and all participants and their families.

References
  1. 1.

    Wopereis, H., et al., The first thousand daysintestinal microbiology of early life: establishing a symbiosis. Pediatr Allergy Immunol, 2014. 25(5): p. 428–38.

     
  2. 2.

    van den Brink, P. J., et al., Principal response curves technique for the analysis of multivariate biomonitoring time series. Environ Monit Assess, 2009. 152(1–4): p. 271–81.

     
  3. 3.

    Wopereis, H., et al., Gut Microbiota Composition of Non-IgE Mediated Cow’s Milk Allergic Infants before and after Dietary Management with a Synbiotics-Supplemented Amino Acid-Based Formula. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 2017. 139(2): p. Ab53-Ab53.

     

D9

Participatory action research to disseminate EAACI food allergy and anaphylaxis guidelines and raise whole school food allergy awareness via development of a practical online ‘self-service’ process toolkit for UK secondary schools

Jennette Higgs1*, Kathryn Styles1, Sarah Bowyer1, Amena Warner2, Carla Jones2

1Nutrition and Dietetic Consultancy, Food To Fit Limited, Northamptonshire, United Kingdom; 2Allergy UK, Sidcup, Kent, United Kingdom

Correspondence: Jennette Higgs - jennette@foodtofit.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D9

Introduction

Recent deaths in UK schools have reinforced the urgency for embedding whole school allergy awareness to minimise risk [1]. Whilst essential, training for emergency AAI administration is not an adequate safeguard in isolation for the school environment [2]. Participatory action research [3–4] is a powerful symbiotic method employing a series of iterative loops of diagnosing, planning, taking action and evaluating to gradually create a contextually appropriate solution to a problem [5]. This analytical framework helps schools immediately begin to improve their whole school practices, whilst working towards implementation of school-specific action plans and a robust allergy policy, embracing best practice [2, 6–7].

Focusing on secondary schools recognises the high risk of this age group [8–10].

Methods

A key stakeholder cross-disciplinary workshop in 2015 initiated a participatory action research programme to develop resources, enabling hands-on, school-led, iterative evaluation of support materials at every stage of the process towards developing whole school allergy awareness. User feedback justified modification, ready for re-testing in three different case study schools. This co-productive approach resonates with school systems. Self-service piloting by new schools, with remote support and monitoring by us will proof-test the toolkit ready for release in downloadable format.

Results
  1. 1.

    Refined process toolkit now available for schools to work through the consecutive stages ‘in-house’[11].

     
  2. 2.

    Toolkit comprises template meeting agendas, activities and resources.

     
  3. 3.

    Staged process drives whole school risk assessment via a School Allergy Action Group, enabling education of ALL staff, catering, parents and pupils; creation of bespoke action plans, designed to address identified priority issues for their school; and development of best practice policy.

     
  4. 4.

    Continuous review process is instilled into toolkit for risk reduction.

     
  5. 5.
    Figure 1 illustrates example outcomes.
    Fig. 1
    Fig. 1

    Whole school allergy awareness process stages with outcomes

     

Conclusion

Live testing in school, with concurrent evaluation and modification of materials has enabled faster development of effective tools for wide scale dissemination. Following the remote piloting and evaluation it will be made available as a free download on https://www.allergyuk.org/. As an online process toolkit, continued evolution based on best practice guidance is automatically picked up by schools, since regular review has been built in.

Improving awareness of the whole school community has the potential to reduce risk of allergic reactions and empower secondary school pupils with allergies, to live independent lives.

References
  1. 1.

    BBC. 12th May 2017. Bow pupil died from allergic reaction. Available from: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-39896499 [Accessed 17th August 2017].

     
  2. 2.

    Muraro A, Agache I, Clark A, Sheikh A, Roberts G, Akdis CA, et al. EAACI Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Guidelines: managing patients with food allergy in the community. Allergy. 2014;69: 1046–1057.

     
  3. 3.

    Reason P, Bradbury H. (eds) The Sage Handbook of Action Research: Participative Inquiry and Practice. London: Sage; 2008.

     
  4. 4.

    Brydon-Miller M, Kral M, Maguire P, Noffke S, Sabhlok A. Jazz and the Banyan Tree: Roots and Riffs on Participatory Action Research. In: Denzin NK, Lincoln YS. (eds.) The Sage Handbook of Qualitative Research 4th edition. Thousand Oaks, California: Sage; 2011. p. 387–401.

     
  5. 5.

    Lewin, K. Action research and minority problems. Journal of Social Issues. 1946; 2(4): 34–46.

     
  6. 6.

    REGULATION (EU) No 1169/2011 OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL of 25 October 2011 on the provision of food information to consumers, amending Regulations (EC) No 1924/2006 and (EC) No 1925/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council, and repealing Commission Directive 87/250/EEC, Council Directive 90/496/EEC, Commission Directive 1999/10/EC, Directive 2000/13/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council, Commission Directives 2002/67/EC and 2008/5/EC and Commission Regulation (EC) No 608/2004.

     
  7. 7.

    Department for Education. Supporting pupils at school with medical conditions. Statutory guidance for governing bodies of maintained schools and proprietors of academies in England. Available from: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/484418/supporting-pupils-at-school-with-medical-conditions.pdf [Accessed 17th August 2017].

     
  8. 8.

    Branum A, Lukacs S. Food allergy among US children: Trends in prevalence and hospitalizations. NCHS data brief, no 10. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics; 2008.

     
  9. 9.

    Marrs T and Lack G. Why do few food‐allergic adolescents treat anaphylaxis with adrenaline?–reviewing a pressing issue. Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, 2013; 24(3), pp. 222–229.

     
  10. 10.

    Pereira B, Venter C, Grundy J, Clayton C, Arshad SH, Dean T. Prevalence of sensitization to food allergens, reported adverse reaction to foods, food avoidance, and food hypersensitivity among teenagers. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2005;116: 884–892.

     
  11. 11.

    Allergy UK. For schools. Available from: https://www.allergyuk.org/information-and-advice/for-schools [Accessed 17th August 2017].

     

D10

Adrenaline auto-injectors prescribing habits in the UK

Brenda DeWitt, Donald Hodge*

Pediatric Allergy Department, Leeds Children’s Hospital, Leeds, United Kingdom

Correspondence: Donald Hodge - donaldhodge@nhs.net

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D10

Introduction

In 2014 the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) published a drug safety update recommending that people who have been prescribed an adrenaline autoinjector (AAI) should carry two at all times. In 2016 the British Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (BSACI) published a guideline ‘‘Prescribing an adrenaline auto-injector’ recommending that the number of AAI’s anyone should carry should be based on an individual risk assessment [1].

If the BSACI guideline is followed and the individual risk assessment is that only one AAI is required, it is essential to ensure that the correct dose AAI is prescribed.

The current BSACI recommended doses of adrenaline available for self-administration are shown in Table 1.
Table 1

Recommended doses of adrenaline available for self-administration [1]

Adult or child > 12 years–0.5 mg [0.3 mg more appropriate for a smaller child > 12 years]

Adult, adolescent or child > 30 kg–0.3 mg

Children 15–30 kg–0.15 mg [0.3 mg may be more appropriate for some children, for example over 25 kg]

Children < 15 kg (unlicensed)–0.15 mg

[EAACI Anaphylaxis guideline recommends > 25 kg : 0.3 mg (2)]

The British National Formulary (BNF) and the Resuscitation Council UK dosages of adrenaline to be administered intramuscularly by healthcare professionals are shown in Table 2.
Table 2

The British National Formulary (BNF) and the Resuscitation Council UK dosages of adrenaline to be administered intramuscularly by healthcare professionals*

Adult or child > 12 years 0.5 mg (= 0.5 mL) [*0.3 mg if child small or pre-pubertal]

Children aged 6–12 years 0.3 mg (= 0.3 mL)

Children < 6 years 0.15 mg (= 0.15 mL)

*Using syringe, needle and vial of adrenaline 1 in 1000 strength

This study examines AAI prescribing habits across the UK.

Methods

Dispensing data was obtained from Lloyds Pharmacy

Results

Between November 2015 and November 2016, 30426 patients were dispensed AAI’s. Of this 30426, 7496 patients (25%) were < 12 years old and 22930 (75%) were > 12 years old.

Of those patients < 12 years old, 76.2% were prescribed 150 mcg products, 23.7% 300 mcg products and 0.1% 500 mcg products.

Of those patients aged 6–12 years old, 65% are prescribed 150 mcg products.

Of those patients > 12 year olds: 2% were prescribed 150 mcg products, 95% 300 mcg products and 3% 500 mcg products.

The majority of CCG’s in England do not appear to be demonstrating any change in dispensing behaviour since the BSACI’s guideline. Scottish Area Teams have shown the greatest change in behaviour over this period with 8 out of 11 areas switching to dispense more single item scripts for AAI. The Grampian area team now dispenses 73% of scripts with 1 item compared to 32% last year.

Conclusion: Recognising that some children > 12 years old will be small (< 50 kg) and not appropriate for a 0.5 mg dose of adrenaline as outlined in Table 1, this data demonstrates that only 3% of > 12 year olds had the appropriate 500 mcg product prescribed. There are therefore a large number of patients who do not have the correct dose AAI prescribed.

If the BSACI guideline is adopted there will be a large number of children of all ages who will be prescribed only 1 AAP after risk assessment. It is therefore essential to ensure that this one AAP is of the correct dose.

References
  1. 1.

    Ewan P et al. BSACI guideline: prescribing an adrenaline auto-injector. Clinical and Experimental Allergy, 2016 (46) 1258–1280

     
  2. 2.

    Muraro A et al. Anaphylaxis: guidelines from the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. Allergy 2014; 69: 1026–1045.

     

D11

Improved standardisation of the whole blood basophil activation test to peanut

Matthew Kwok1,2*, Gideon Lack1,2,3, Alexandra F. Santos1,2,3

1Department of Pediatric Allergy, Division of Asthma, Allergy and Lung Biology, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom; 2MRC and Asthma UK Centre in Allergic Mechanisms of Asthma, London, United Kingdom; 3Children’s Allergy Service, Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospital, London, United Kingdom

Correspondence: Matthew Kwok - matthew.kwok1@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D11

Introduction

The basophil activation test (BAT) is a valuable tool to diagnose peanut allergy; however, there is currently no standardised methodology for this test. We performed the BAT within 4 h of blood collection or 24 h later, using liquid or lyophilised antibodies and following a two-step or one-step simplified procedure.

Methods

Whole blood from patients with suspected peanut allergy was collected in lithium heparin tubes, stored at room temperature and tested within 4 or 24 h of blood collection. Blood was stained with liquid or lyophilised antibodies using a BAT method of incubating blood with peanut extract (PE) or controls (RPMI, anti-IgE and fMLP) before staining with fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies in two steps or a one-step simplified incubation procedure. Flow cytometry was performed using FACS Canto II with FACSDiva Software. The results were analysed with FlowJo v10. Statistical analyses were performed using IBM SPSS Statistics v21.

Results

Within 4 h of blood collection, basophil activation detected with lyophilised antibodies was not significantly different from basophil activation detected with liquid antibodies when stimulation and staining were performed using the two-step procedure (p = 0.123 for stimulation with PE; p = 0.161 for stimulation with anti-IgE). The percentage of CD63 + basophils using the simplified one-step procedure was higher with lyophilised antibodies compared to liquid antibodies (p = 0.012 for PE, p = 0.012 for anti-IgE). Within 24 h of blood collection, a decrease in the percentage of CD63 + basophils stained with liquid antibodies and using the two-step method was observed in response to PE (p = 0.028) and anti-IgE (p = 0.008) compared to when BAT was performed within 4 h of blood collection. A decrease in basophil CD63 + expression at 24 h was also observed with lyophilised antibodies using the two-step method (p = 0.017 for PE, p = 0.025 for anti-IgE) and with lyophilised antibodies using the one-step procedure (p = 0.012 for PE, p = 0.012 for anti-IgE).

Conclusion

Using a two-step incubation procedure, the results of BAT with lyophilised antibodies were comparable to the results of BAT with liquid antibodies and allowed improved standardisation of the BAT methodology. Using a one-step incubation procedure, lyophilised antibodies induced enhanced basophil activation that was independent of allergen stimulation and therefore not desirable. Performing BAT on the same day of blood collection using blood stored at room temperature ensured higher level of basophil reactivity.

D12

Current management and use of oral immunotherapy (OIT) for peanut allergy in pediatric patients in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland and UK (EU6)

Andrea Vereda1*, Katharina Blümchen2, George Du Toit3, Frederic de Blay4, Nicholas Georgitseas5, Marie Cassese6, Aditya Venugopal6, Ellen Zigmont7

1Aimmune Therapeutics, London, United Kingdom; 2University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany; 3Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospitals, London, United Kingdom; 4University Hospital Strasbourg, Strasburg, France; 5Navigant, London, United Kingdom; 6Navigant, New York, New York, United States of America; 7Aimmune Therapeutics, San Francisco, California, United States of America

Correspondence: Andrea Vereda - avereda@aimmune.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D12

Introduction

Peanut allergy is a major health burden in Europe; avoidance and acute management are the major therapeutic approaches. Experimental peanut OIT has been evaluated in several small studies in Europe, yet remains unapproved and is not recommended by EAACI. The objective is to detail current practice protocols for experimental peanut OIT for children in the EU6 and understand how practice differs between clinics.

Methods

We conducted qualitative, in-depth, telephonic interviews with seventy-five allergists and fifteen nurse food allergy specialists across the EU6 between September 2016 and February 2017. Eligibility criteria included managing > 100 peanut allergy patients per year and offering immunotherapy in their clinic (food or environmental).

Results

72/90 clinicians interviewed treat pediatric (either exclusively or both pediatric and adult) peanut allergic patients. All patients receive a full diagnostic workup; in select cases, a food-challenge is performed and moderate/severe patients receive an autoinjector, however, this varies by country. Experimental peanut OIT in children varies significantly across practices, particularly with regards to patient selection, protocols, and peanut material used.

Patient selection: Some physicians view disease severity as a primary selection criteria whereas others weigh family environment as equally important

Peanut material: Includes whole peanuts (Spain), peanut candy (France, Switzerland), pharmacy-compounded peanut flour capsules (Germany, Italy, UK), peanut administered in liquid solution (Switzerland)

Starting dose: Can be patient-tailored, e.g. in France and Switzerland, patients initiated at 10% of the reactive food challenge dose or fixed; in Germany, and Italy, dose ranges from 0.1 to 10 mg whole peanut in different practices

End-dose: 500 mg - ~ 1 gm whole peanut

Up-dosing interval: Every few days, up to 1 month

Clinician oversight during up-dosing: Ranges from no oversight (patients updose themselves at home with the assistance of a parent or caregiver) to intensive monitoring (patient observed for 3–4 h following peanut OIT updosing administration, monitored by physician or nurse)

Frequency of OIT use: Ranges from being offered throughout the country in allergy centers (France) to only being offered in clinical trial settings (Germany)

Amongst those physicians not offering peanut OIT, major barriers include lack of an EMA approved therapy for children, no standardized protocols, and the absence of a recommendation in national guidelines.

Conclusions

Substantial variability in the approach to experimental peanut OIT exists within and across European countries. Physicians indicate a significant unmet need for a standardized, EMA approved OIT protocol to treat peanut allergies as well as tailored protocols to treat children.

D13

Childhood mactocytosis and anaphylaxis after oral amoxicillin: beyond drug allergy

Isis Monteiro1*, António J. Cabral1, Ricardo Fernandes1, Joana Fermeiro1, Cristina Tapadinhas2, Anabela Lopes3, Ana Margarda Neves3

1Pediatric Allergy Unit, Hospital de Santa Maria, Lisbon, Portugal; 2Dermatology Department, Hospital de Santa Maria, Lisbon, Portugal; 3Immunoallergology Department, Hospital de Santa Maria, Lisbon, Portugal

Correspondence: Isis Monteiro - isis.sm@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D13

Introduction: Mastocytosis is a rare group of disorders characterized by clonal proliferation and excessive accumulation of mast cells in tissues. Cutaneous mactocytosis (CM) is the predominant form in children, usually benign, though anaphylaxis can occur due to facilitated release of mast cell activation mediators.

The incidence of anaphylaxis in children with mastocytosis is higher than in general pediatric population. Specific triggers may be implicated (foods, hymenoptera venom), but its cause is most frequently idiopathic or unidentified.

Case report: Male child with diagnosis of CM at 3 years of age, manifested by cutaneous lesions on the trunk since birth with positive Darier’s sign, confirmed by skin biopsy and normal serum tryptase. Clinical course was stable under oral antihistamine. At age 7, the patient was diagnosed with bacterial tonsillitis and prescribed oral amoxicillin. Fifteen minutes after first intake, he developed generalized urticaria and angioedema of the face and tongue, requiring emergency treatment with adrenaline and antihistamine. The child was first evaluated in Pediatric Drug Allergy consult at age 8, presenting frequent nasal pruritus, dry cough and occasional wheezing and shortness of breath. The laboratory workup showed eosinophilia (1170/mm3), normal serum tryptase (5.1 μg/L), elevated total IgE (785 U/mL), negative IgE for beta-lactams (penicillin G and V, ampicillin, amoxicillin and cefaclor) and positive IgE specific for airborne allergens (D. pteronyssinus > 100 kU/L, D. farinae 59.0 kU/L, D. glomerata 23.0 kU/L, A. alternata 0.75 kU/L). Genetic study was negative for KIT D816 V mutation. Sequential in vivo tests were performed (skin prick and intradermal tests) with PPL, MDM, penicillin, amoxicillin, clavulanate, cefuroxime and ceftriaxone, with no immediate or late reaction. He later underwent a challenge test with oral cefuroxime, also negative. Currently aged 9, the child carries an adrenaline autoinjector device; he remains stable and no new anaphylactic events were reported.

Conclusion: Anaphylaxis in patients with mastocytosis requires a detailed, careful approach to identify the causal agent and its implication in the reaction (which is not always possible). In the presented case, the accute infection may have played a facilitating role and the investigation ruled out specific hypersensitivity to beta-lactams. It also provided a safe alternative to amoxicillin within a first-line antibacterial drug class, avoiding potential life-threatning events in the future.

Consent to publish

The parents of the patient have provided written consent to publish.

D16

Cutaneous exposure to clinically-relevant pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan) proteins promote TH2-dependent sensitization and IgE-mediated anaphylaxis in BALB/c mice

Rinkesh Kumar Gupta1,28*, Kriti Gupta1*, Premendra Dhar Dwivedi1

1Food Toxicology Laboratory, Food, Drug and Chemical Toxicology Group, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR), Lucknow UP, India; 2Department of Biosciences, Integral University, Dasauli UP, India

Correspondence: Kriti Gupta - rinkesh.gupta9@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D16

Introduction

Epicutaneous (EC) sensitization to food allergens may occur when the skin has been lightly damaged. The study here tested whether cutaneous exposure to pigeon pea protein(s) may cause allergic sensitization. BALB/c mice were either orally gavaged or epicutaneously sensitized by repeated application of pigeon pea crude protein extract (CPE) on undamaged areas of skin without any adjuvant; afterwards, both groups were orally challenged with the pigeon pea CPE. The experimental results support the hypothesis that in addition to oral exposure, skin exposure to food allergens can promote Th2-dependent sensitization, IgE-mediated anaphylaxis and intestinal changes after oral challenge. Based on this, an avoidance of cutaneous exposures to allergens might prevent development of food anaphylaxis.

Methods
  1. 1.

    Epicutaneous and oral treatment

     
  2. 2.

    Analysis of signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis

     
  3. 3.

    Type 1 skin test

     
  4. 4.

    Measures of specific IgE and IgG1 and of MCPT-1 and TSLP

     
  5. 5.

    Histopathology of skin and intestine

     
  6. 6.

    Expression of cytokines and TFs

     
  7. 7.

    Isolation of skin and intestinal proteins and Western blotting

     
  8. 8.

    Mast cell staining

     

Results

In the epicutaneously-sensitized mice, elevated levels of specific IgE and IgG1, as well as of MCPT-1, TSLP, TH2 cytokines and TFs, higher anaphylactic scores and histological changes in the skin and intestine were indicative of sensitization ability via both routes in the pigeon pea CPE-treated hosts. Elevated levels of mast cells were observed in both the skin and intestine. Decreased levels of filaggrin in skin may have played a key role in the skin barrier dysfunction, increasing the chances of sensitization.

Conclusions

Little is known regarding the prevention of food allergy development via the EC exposure. The current study identified an IgE-mediated anaphylaxis following oral challenge and induction of TH2-biased adaptive immune responses when mice were exposed to pigeon pea proteins on their healthy intact skin. An additional interesting finding was that EC sensitization also yielded intestinal changes with reference to mast cells. The immune response caused by IL-4 and IL-13 contributes to the impairment in filaggrin, therefore neutralization of IL-4 and IL-13 that may improve skin barrier dysfunction. These findings support the hypothesis that cutaneous exposure to food allergens may be a risk factor for the allergic sensitization and development of food allergy.

Acknowledgements

The authors are grateful to the Director of the Institute for the keen interest in this study. RKG is thankful to the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR), New Delhi for award of his Senior Research Fellowship. KG is thankful to the Department of Science and Technology (DST), New Delhi for award of her Women Scientist. This is CSIR-IITR manuscript number 3379.

References
  1. 1.

    Sicherer SH, Leung DY. 2015. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2014. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 135:357–367.

     
  2. 2.

    Sicherer SH, Sampson HA. 2010. Food allergy. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 125:S116–S125.

     

D17

The prevalence of cashew nut sensitisation and allergy in children presenting to an Irish tertiary allergy clinic

Susan Keogh1,2, Aideen Byrne1,2*, Cathryn O’Carroll1,2

1Allergy Department, Our Lady’s Children’s Hospital, Dublin, Ireland; 2Dept of Pediatrics, The National Children’s Hospital Tallaght, Dublin, Ireland

Correspondence: Aideen Byrne - aideen.byrne@olchc.i.e.

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D17

Introduction

Cashew nut allergy, associated with a high risk of anaphylaxis, is increasing worldwide [1]. Food allergy prevention is a growing reality and thus it is important that the specific food allergy risks of different populations are identified. In the past 10 years, cashew consumption in Europe, including Ireland, has grown by 30%. A recent UK study revealed a differential prevalence in cashew allergy between Caucasian and Asian populations [2]. This study explored the current prevalence of cashew sensitisation in moderate to severe eczematous Irish children and any identifiable ethnical differences.

Method

A retrospective review was performed on a database of patients 6 months to 17 years attending the tertiary allergy clinic. Details including clinical history and results of skin prick testing (SPT) had been collected over a 8mth period between June 2015–April 2016. SPT of ≥ 3 mm was considered a positive result. SPT of ≥ 8 mm was considered “likely allergic”. Ethnicity had not originally been recorded. Ethical approval was obtained to contact families to establish ethnicity, as per Irish census criteria, and to confirm tolerance or reactions to cashew.

Results

The database contained 306 patients. 123(40.1%) were sensitised to cashew by SPT. 88 0f 123 had moderate to severe eczema. 65(52.8%) had a history of asthma. 96(78%) were co-sensitised ± clinically allergic to peanut. 93(75%) were co-sensitised to egg. 15% of sensitised patients were confirmed to tolerate cashew. In contrast, 16.8% of sensitised patients had had confirmed allergic reactions to cashew. There was a significant association between wheals > 8 mm and a previous reaction; Relative Risk (RR) 2.5094(95% CI: 1.0996–5.7266 p = 0.0288). The data shows that 16% of the total cohort were either sensitised SPT > 8 mm or had had an allergic reaction to cashew.

Ethnicity was confirmed in 113 of 123. White Irish: 76 Other white:15 Black Irish/Black African/Other Black:0 Chinese:5 Other Asian:17. Chinese and Other Asian account for 19.5% of the cohort. These 2 ethnicity groups together compared with White ethnicity groups collectively were more likely to have wheals > 8 mm RR1.7727 (95% CI:1.0856–2.8948 p 0.0221).

Conclusion

This data shows cashew sensitisation and cashew allergy as a common finding in atopic Irish children. Thus cashew allergy poses a significant health risk and prevention strategise should be considered. Furthermore, our cashew sensitised/allergic cohort appears to be over represented by Chinese/Asian children. In the 2016 Irish census only 2.1% of the population identified themselves as Chinese or Other Asian. Thus preventative strategies in this group should be a priority.

References
  1. 1.

    Van der Valk JPM, Dubois AEJ, Gerth van Wijk R, Wichers HJ, De Jong NW. Systematic review on cashew nut allergy. Allergy 2014; 69: 692–698.

     
  2. 2.

    Luyt DK, Vaughan D, Oyewole E, Stiefel G. Ethnic differences in prevalence of cashew nut, pistachio nut and almond allergy, Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016; 27: 645–659.

     

D18

Patterns of tree nut sensitisation among those with challenge confirmed food allergy at 12 months in the HealthNuts study

Vicki McWilliam1,2,3*, Rachel Peters1, Mimi L. K. Tang1,2,3, Shyamali Dharmage4, Jennifer Koplin1, Katrina J. Allen1,2,3,5

1Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, Australia; 2Department of Pediatrics, the University of Melbourne, Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, Australia; 3Department of Allergy and Immunology, Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, Australia; 4Allergy and Lung Health Unit Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, the University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia; 5Institute of Inflammation and Repair, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom

Correspondence: Vicki McWilliam - vicki.mcwilliam@rch.org.au

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D18

Introduction

The LEAP study findings1 have resulted in updated infant feeding advice recommending peanut introduction before 12 months of age. However, advice regarding the introduction of other nuts is at present unclear and the usefulness of sensitisation status to guide introduction recommendations is debated. We aimed to determine the rate of tree nut sensitisation among those with challenge confirmed allergy to egg, peanut or sesame at age 1 year.

Methods

Within the HealthNuts study, a population-representative longitudinal cohort study of 5276 infants, skin prick testing (SPT) was performed to egg, peanut and sesame at age 1 recruitment. Those with a SPT > 1 mm had an oral food challenge (OFC) to test for food allergy. For those attending OFC clinic appointment additional SPT were performed for tree nuts (almond, cashew, and hazelnut). Tree nut sensitisation was defined as > 3 mm wheal. Tree nuts with negative SPT were instructed to be introduced to the diet and those tree nuts with positive SPT avoided.

Results

Of 493 12 month olds with challenge confirmed food allergy, 143 (29%, 95% CI 25.0, 33.2) were sensitised to one or more tree nuts at age 1. Those with single food allergies had the lowest rates of tree nut sensitisation with 31% (95% CI 19.1, 46.0) of single peanut allergic infants (n = 51) sensitised to one or more tree nuts and 23% (95% CI 18.8, 27.8) of those with single egg allergy (n = 364). Those with two or more food allergies (n = 104) had higher rates of tree nut sensitisation at 48% (95% CI 38.2, 58.1). Cashew was the most common tree nut sensitisation at 23%, followed by almond (13%) then hazelnut (11%).

Conclusion

Tree nut sensitisation is common among those with all forms of food allergy at 12 months of age. Sensitisation rates are highest for those with multiple food allergies and similar for those with peanut and egg allergy.

Reference
  1. 1.

    DuToit, G et al. Randomised trial of peanut consumption in infants at risk of peanut allergy. N Eng J Med 2015;372:803–813.

     

D20

The quality of management offered by the general pediatrician, ENT and primary care health professionals for children with allergic rhinitis including the patient and parents understanding of the correct technique for administration of topical nasal steroid spray (TSNS)

Tushar Banerjee*, Antima Banerjee

County Durham and Darlington Foundation Trust, Darlington, United Kingdom

Correspondence: Tushar Banerjee - bnrjt07@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D20

Introduction

The objective is to explore the quality of management of allergic rhinitis in children with moderate to severe symptoms managed by the primary care, general pediatric and ENT clinics in a District General Hospital (DGH) and to assess the user technique for TSNS administration.

Methods

In this study, 46 patients (5–15 years) with moderate to severe seasonal and perennial allergic rhinitis were included. The majority (n = 28) were referred from primary care, 12 patients from general pediatric and 6 cases from ENT clinic. These patientswere referred for multisystem allergy management in the specialist pediatric allergy clinic in a DGH in the North East of England. During the consultation, the user technique of TSNS administration was observed and compared to the ideal technique mentioned in the ‘Standard Operating Procedure’ (SOP) published by British Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (BSACI) in 2013. Further data on clinical management was gathered from structured clinical history during the clinic consultation.

Results

8/46 children with allergic rhinitis were misdiagnosed as ‘recurrent viral upper respiratory tract infection’ in primary care whereas 38 children had a diagnosis and treatment of allergic rhinitis. 5/38 patients received symptomatic treatment with chlorpheniramine alone whereas 15/38 cases received regular second generation antihistamines. 20/38 children were advised to use TSNS of which 12/20 cases (all general pediatric referral) did not receive any advice on technique for the use of TSNS, whereas all 6 cases referred from general ENT clinic and 2 children referred from the primary care received verbal advice on the technique. 10/20 cases used TSNS regularly. None of the 20 children including the 8 cases who received verbal advice could manage to follow all the correct steps as mentioned in BSACI-SOP. During the demonstration, none of the children cleared nose before using TSNS, 5/20 children shook the bottle before use, and all children actively sniffed while activating the spray. All patients choose to use standing position; only 6/20 had the correct position of the head and 5/20 used the correct hand during the administration.

Conclusion

The standard of care is inconsistent and fragmented for the management of pediatric allergic rhinitis in both primary and secondary care. The regular basic allergy updates for primary and secondary care health professionals and the use of audiovisual training for patient education on TSNS use is strongly recommended for improving the quality of care of allergic rhinitis in children.

D21

Clinical relevance of the SQ HDM SLIT-tablet in adolescents with moderate-to-severe house dust mite allergic rhinitis

Tomokazu Matsuoka1, David I. Bernstein2, Keisuke Masuyama1, Hendrik Nolte3, Kazuhiro Okamiya 4, Hanne Villesen3, Harold S. Nelson5

1University of Yamanashi, Yamanashi, Japan; 2University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States of America; 3ALK, Hørsholm, Denmark; 4Torii Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd, Tokyo, Japan; 5Department of Medicine National Jewish Health, Denver, Colorado, United States of America

Correspondence: Riis Bente - berdk@alk.net

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D21

Introduction

House dust mite (HDM) respiratory allergy is a common and burdensome disease in children and adolescents. The SQ HDM sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) tablet has shown to be efficacious in adults and adolescents with HDM allergic rhinitis. This abstract presents findings illustrating the clinical relevance of the efficacy from pooled data from adolescents (12–17 years) included in 2 phase III trials.

Methods

In 2 DBPC trials conducted in North America (clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01700192) and Japan (JapicCTI number 121848), subjects aged 12 + years with moderate-to-severe HDM allergic rhinitis were randomised to up to 1 year of treatment. The primary endpoint was the average total combined rhinitis score (TCRS) during the last 8 weeks of treatment in the active group compared to placebo. Data from subjects aged 12–17 years were pooled.

Post-hoc analyses concerning rhinitis exacerbation days and mild days were done for placebo versus 12 SQ-HDM. A rhinitis exacerbation day was defined as a day with an allergic rhinitis symptom score of 6, or 5 with one individual symptom scored 3 (i.e. implying a symptom that is hard to tolerate and causes interference with activities of daily living and/or sleeping). A mild day was defined as a day with no individual symptom scored higher than 1 (i.e. the symptom was clearly present but caused minimal awareness and was easily tolerated) and no antihistamine use.

Results

In the pooled adolescent subpopulation (N = 395), the average TCRS improved 22% with 12 SQ-HDM versus placebo (absolute difference of 1.04;p = 0.002). The estimated probability of experiencing a rhinitis exacerbation was 22.6% for placebo and 9.3% with 12 SQ-HDM (OR = 0.35; 95% CI [0.14; 0.88]; p = 0.026). The estimated probability for experiencing a mild rhinitis day was 28.5% with placebo and 47.1% with 12 SQ-HDM (OR = 2.23; 95% CI [1.18; 4.24]; p = 0.014).

Extrapolated to a full year, this corresponds to 82 days with rhinitis exacerbation and 3½ months of mild days in the placebo group, compared with 34 days with rhinitis exacerbation and almost 6 months of mild days in the 12 SQ-HDM group.

Conclusion

Treatment with 12 SQ-HDM significantly improved the TCRS in adolescents with moderate-to-severe HDM allergic rhinitis. Furthermore, the treatment reduced the patient’s probability for having rhinitis exacerbation days and increased the probability for having mild days with no more than minimal awareness of symptoms. Taken together these findings illustrate the clinical relevance of the SQ HDM SLIT-tablet seen in adolescents in moderate-to-severe HDM allergic rhinitis.

D23

The association between nasal eosinophil and aeroallergen sensitization in children and adolescents in Seoul, Korea

Lee Hye Jin*

Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea Republic

Correspondence: Lee Hye Jin - kchyejin@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D23

Introduction

Local infiltration of eosinophils is the hallmark of allergic inflammation in the nasal tissues. Nasal eosinophil examination is useful in the diagnosis of nasal allergic inflammation and allergic rhinitis. Nasal exposure to sensitized aeroallergens increases nasal eosinophil and nasal allergenic symptoms.

Methods

To identify the correlation between nasal eosinophil and aeroallergen sensitization in children and adolescents. We recruited patients less than 18 years of age, with a history of chronic and acute rhinitis, and those who had nasal eosinophil examinations and MAST to aeroallergens between March 2013 and February 2016 at the Allergy Clinic in Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital in Seoul, Korea. Patients’ medical records were reviewed retrospectively. We analyzed data using T test, Mann–Whitney test and ANOVA to determine the association between nasal eosinophil and 18 aeroallergens (i.e. Birch-Alder Mix, oak white, Bermuda grass, orchard grass, timothy grass, sweet vernal grass, rye, mugwort, short ragweed, Japanese hop, Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus, Cladosporium, cats, dogs, cockroaches, Dermatophagoides farinae, and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus).

Results

Of the 245 patients enrolled, 156 (63.7%) were males and mean age (± standard deviation [SD]) was 7.9 years (± 3.8). In total, 175 (71.4%) patients were sensitized to at least one of the 18 aeroallergens tested. Additionally, 118 (48.2%) and 69 (28.2%) patients had at least 1 and 5% prevalence rates of nasal eosinophils, respectively. None of the patients had severe lower respiratory infection (e.g. pneumonia) or were immunocompromised. There were significant differences in the percentage of nasal eosinophils between the groups sensitized and non- sensitized to aeroallergens (P < 0.001). Among the 18 aeroallergens, 18 (8.3%) patients who were sensitized to Alternaria alternata showed the greatest mean percentage (± SD) of nasal eosinophil (27.9% [± 32.4]) and the greatest significant difference in the proportion of nasal eosinophil when compared to the non-sensitized group (7.8% [± 17.1]) (P = 0.001).

Conclusion

Nasal eosinophil was significantly associated with sensitization to aeroallergens. Data suggest that nasal eosinophil is the most common among patients sensitized to Alternariaalternata.

D24

Clinical profile, aeroallergen sensitivity and assessment of pulmonary function in pediatric chronic rhinosinusitis

Anamika Anamika1*, Arunabha Chakravarti1, Raj Kumar2

1Department of ENT and Head and Neck Surgery, Lady Hardinge Medical College and Associated Hospitals, New Delhi, India; 2National Centre of Respiratory Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, Department of Respiratory Allergy and Applied Immunology, Vallabhbhai Patel Chest Institute, University of Delhi, Delhi, India

Correspondence: Anamika Anamika - anamikakoro@yahoo.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D24

Introduction

The role of atopy has been suggested in development of CRS as allergic rhinitis commonly co-exists in pediatric and adult patients with CRS [1]. Allergic disorders are known to affect quality of life of both parents and children with the disease [2]. And if co-exist with CRS these may add to the impairment in quality of life. There is paucity of literature on pulmonary function test and quality of life assessment in children with CRS and allergy. Theknowledge of aeroallergen sensitivities in children with CRS and allergic rhinitis is important as it will help in improving both diagnostic and treatment strategies [3].

Methods

This descriptive, observational, cross sectional study included 110 children, aged 7–18 years, fulfilling the requisite inclusion criteria and diagnosed with CRS at pediatric ENT clinic of a tertiary referral centre from November 2015 to March 2017. Clinical grading of symptoms was done with the help of Global Assessment of Rhinosinusitis Symptom Severity Score [4] and each patient underwent diagnostic nasal endoscopy and Lund Mackay endoscopic score [5] was calculated. These patients underwent skin prick testing [6] for 65 common aeroallergens, absolute eosinophil counts, serum total IgE level and pulmonary function test [7]. The quality of life was assessed with the help of SN-5 quality of life survey [8].

Results

Positive skin prick test to at least one of the common aeroallergens was present in 52.7% patients. Aeroallergen sensitivity for single aeroallergen was present in 28.2% and for multiple aeroallergens was present in 24.5%. Most common aeroallergen positivity was seen with insects (43.6%). 8.1% of children with CRS had evidence of lower airway obstruction on pulmonary function test. SPT positive patients had significantly high mean SN-5 score than SPT negative patients (P value-0.000).

Conclusion

There is a high prevalence of allergy in pediatric patients with CRS. There is a trend of lower airway obstruction in this group of patients. The quality of life of allergic children with CRS is poorer as compared to non allergic children with CRS.

References
  1. 1.

    Krause HF. Allergy and chronic rhinosinusitis. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2003;128:14–16.

     
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    Juniper EF. Quality of life in adults and children with asthma and rhinitis. Allergy. 1997;52(10):971–7.

     
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    Sedaghat AR, Phipatanakul W, Cunningham MJ. Characterization ofaeroallergen sensitivities in children with allergic rhinitis and chronic rhinosinusitis. allergy rhinol (providence). 2014;5(3):e143-e145.

     
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    D.J. Kay, R.M. Rosenfeld, Quality of life for children with persistent sinonasal symptoms, Otolaryngol.—Head Neck Surg. 128 (2003) 17–26.

     
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    Lund VJ, Mackay IS.Staging in rhinosinusitus.Rhinology. 1993;31(4):183–4.

     
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    Dreborg S. The safety of skin tests and the information obtained from using different methods and concentrations of allergen. Allergy 1993;48:473–5

     
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    Lung function testing: selection of reference values and interpretative strategies. American Thoracic Society. Am Rev Respir Dis. 1991;144(5):1202–18.

     
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    Kay DJ, Rosenfeld RM. Quality of life for children with persistent sinonasal symptoms, Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2003; 128:17–26.

     

D25

Genome-wide association study of asthma exacerbations in European children treated with inhaled corticosteroids

Susanne J. Vijverberg1,2±*, Natalia Hernandez-Pacheco, Niloufar Farzan1,2, Ben Francis4, Carlos Flores3,5, Maximilian Schieck6,7, Patricia Soares8, Leila Karimi9, Roger Tavendale10, Sommath Mukhopadhyay8,11, Katia M.C. Verhamme9, Munir Pirmohamed12, Colin N. Palmer,11, Steve Turner13, Daniel B Hawcutt4,14, Michael Kabesch6,7, Maria Pino-Yanes3,5±, Anke H. Maitland-van der Zee1,2± on behalf of the PiCA and SysPharmPedia consortia

1Department of Respiratory Medicine, Academic Medical Center (AMC). University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; 2Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Clinical Pharmacology, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands; 3Research Unit, Hospital Universitario N.S. de Candelaria, Universidad de La Laguna, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain; 4Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom; 5CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; 6Deptartment of Pediatric Pneumology and Allergy, University Children’s Hospital Regensburg (KUNO), Regensburg, Germany; 7Deptartment of Pediatric Pneumology, Allergy and Neonatology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany; Member of the German Lung Research Center (DZL); 8Academic Department of Pediatrics, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Royal Alexandra Children’s Hospital, Brighton, United Kingdom; 9Deptartment of Medical Informatics, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; 10Division of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Dundee, Dundee, United Kingdom; 11Population Pharmacogenetics Group, Biomedical Research Institute, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, University of Dundee, Dundee, United Kingdom; 12Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom; 13Child Health, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom; 14Alder Hey Children’s Hospital, Liverpool, United Kingdom; ± These authors contributed equally to this work

Correspondence: Susanne J. Vijverberg - s.j.vijverberg@amc.uva.nl

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D25

Introduction

Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are the most commonly prescribed medication to control persistent asthma. However, a high proportion of patients does not respond to this medication and suffer exacerbations. Genetic variation has shown to influence treatment response to ICS. In this study we aim to identify genetic variants associated with asthma exacerbations despite ICS use in European children.

Methods

Within the Pharmacogenomics in Childhood Asthma (PiCA) consortium we performed a Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) of asthma exacerbations in 3 European cohorts; PACMAN (NL), PASS (UK), and followMAGICS (GER). In total, 1204 asthmatic children treated with ICS were analysed. Imputation of genetic variants was performed using the Haplotype Reference Consortium as reference panel by means of the Michigan Imputation Server. Association testing of 7.5 million genetic variants with minor allele frequency ≥ 1% was performed using logistic regression models with EPACTS. Subsequently, results were meta-analyzed using METASOFT.

Results

A total of 74 genetic variants were suggestively associated with asthma exacerbations despite the use of ICS (p ≤ 5 × 10−6). The most significant variants were located in 9 different loci (minimum p-value = 2.3x10−7), including one gene previously identified as associated with ICS response in Asian populations (ALLC). Additionally, novel associations were revealed in biologically plausible genes with drug metabolism functions and in genes belonging to the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

Conclusion

This is the first GWAS of ICS response in European children with asthma. We identified several novel genes suggestively associated with asthma exacerbations despite the use of ICS. These results will be validated with further independent studies.

This work was supported by Instituto de Salud Carlos III (AC15/00015) and the ERACoSysMed 1st Joint Transnational Call (SysPharmPedia, ID:99) from the European Union, under the Horizon 2020.

D27

Pediatrics living with severe asthma in the year 2016: results of a global survey

Paraskevi Katsaounou1*, Marcela Gavornikova2, Michael E. Hyland3, Xavier Jaumont2, Lorena Garcia Conde2, Matthias Gasser4, Mikaela Odemyr5, Ismail Kasujee2

1Respiratory Medicine National and Kapodistrian, University of Athens, Athens, Greece; 2Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland; 3School of Psychology, University of Plymouth, Plymouth, United Kingdom; 4GFK Switzerland AG, Basel, Switzerland; 5European Federation of Allergy and Airways Diseases Patients’ Associations (EFA), Brussels, Belgium

Correspondence: Paraskevi Katsaounou - paraskevikatsaounou@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D27

Introduction

We present findings from a global survey assessing the impact of severe asthma on the daily lives of patients, conducted to evaluate what had changed 10 years after the EFA survey ‘Still Fighting for Breath’.

Methods

Patients aged 6–17 years with severe persistent asthma were included (through their caregivers who completed a questionnaire on asthma control, daily/physical activity, psychological aspects and treatment). Data were collected using an online survey conducted by GfK Health on behalf of Novartis between 12 July and 31 October 2016 in seven countries.

Results

Caregivers (N = 152) of children and adolescents diagnosed with severe asthma were included (country-wise distribution and patient demographics shown in Table 1). Of the total population, 55% of adolescents and 67% of children were diagnosed with allergic asthma (Fig. 1).
Table 1

Sample distribution and patient demographics

 

Adolescents*

Children*

Total

Country

 United Kingdom

18

11

29

 France

15

15

30

 Germany

14

10

24

 Brazil

10

20

30

 Canada

3

6

9

 Spain

4

16

20

 Italy

5

5

10

 Total

69

83

152

Male/Female, %

52/48

54/46

N/A

Age, years

 Male, mean ± SD

14 ± 1.5

8 ± 1.5

N/A

 Female, mean ± SD

14 ± 1.8

8 ± 1.8

N/A

Diagnosis by, %

 Pediatricians

20

31

N/A

 Respiratory physicians

23

27

N/A

 Allergists

23

24

N/A

 General practioners

30

18

N/A

Mean disease duration, years

7

3

N/A

*Data captured through caregivers. Patients were aged between 6 and 17 years

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Proportion (%) of adolescents and children diagnosed with allergic or non-allergic asthma assessed as per individual patient’s knowledge

A large discrepancy was observed between patient-reported perceived asthma control (54%) and asthma control as per GINA guidelines (12%; figures for adolescents and children reported in Fig. 2).
Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Level of control a as perceived by patients, b as per GINA control questionnaire

The majority of patients took both controller and reliever medications (Fig. 3). In the previous year, 86% of adolescents and 72% of children experienced exacerbations (most common symptoms were cough, wheezing, persistent shortness of breath, breathlessness even while lying down, fatigue) that required intervention by HCPs (50% of adolescents and 39% of children experienced ≥ 2). The majority of patients physically recovered within 24 h after treatment; however, emotional/psychological recovery took longer (17% adolescents and 25% children took ≥ 1 week). On average, they received 20 days of OCS in the last 6 months.
Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Proportion (%) of adolescents and children with severe persistent asthma on maintenance treatment, as needed reliever medication or on both

Anxiety and depression related to asthma was diagnosed in 39 and 13% of adolescents and 18 and 10% of children, respectively. Of caregivers, 36% felt their professional lives were negatively affected by their child’s disease. A large proportion of adolescents (84%) and children (67%) reported to have disruption in daily living activities with lack of exercise tolerance most often mentioned (25% adolescents and 21% children). Physical activities (90% adolescents; 89% children) and social activities (59% adolescents; 46% children) were disrupted and 90% of respondents reported disturbed sleep.

Conclusion

There is a strong disconnect between GINA-defined (12%) and patient-perceived asthma control (54%) in patients with severe persistent asthma. This study indicates that the majority of children and adolescent patients remain uncontrolled, have serious restrictions in their daily activities and poor psychological state. Patients with severe persistent asthma need improved disease management (support and strategies) to achieve better asthma control and live normal, unrestrained lives.

Acknowledgements

This study was funded by Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland

D29

The impact of food allergy on asthma morbidity amongst schoolchildren

Idun Holmdahl*, Björn Nordlund, Anna Asanoj, Gunilla Hedlin, Jon Konradsen

The Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden

Correspondence: Idun Holmdahl - idun_hp@hotmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D29

Introduction

Food allergy and asthma often coexist in children. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between food allergy and asthma morbidity in children with asthma of different severity.

Methods

The study included school-age children with severe asthma (def.: persistent symptoms and/or exacerbations despite high doses of inhaled corticosteroids (≥800 μg Budesonide/24 h)) (n = 57) and aged-matched children with controlled asthma (def.: low doses of inhaled corticosteroids (≤400 μg Budesonide/24 h) and no symptoms) (n = 39). The protocol included a questionnaire, asthma control test (ACT), exhaled NO (FENO), metacholine provocation (dose response slope, DRS), and blood sampling for IgE antibodies (Phadiatop and Fx5) and blood eosinophils.

Results

The mean age of the participants were 13.4 years and 58% were boys. The majority were sensitized to at least one allergen (83%) and had a family history of asthma/allergy (91%). 33% of the participants had suffered an anaphylactic reaction and 66% had IgE antibodies against ≥ 1 food allergen.

Children with severe asthma had a lower score at ACT (17.1 vs. 22.9) (p < 0.001) and more asthma symptoms during the night (49 vs. 5) (p < 0.001). There were no difference between the two groups regarding family history (p = 0.39) and anaphylaxis (p = 0.38)

The children in the study were divided into three groups based on Phadiatop and Fx5; Group 1: only sensitized to airborne allergens (n = 35), Group 2: sensitized to food and airborne allergens (n = 40) and Group 3: non-atopic (n = 21). Group 2 had a higher level of FENO (median 25 compared to group 1: 17 and group 3: 9) (p = 0.004) and increased bronchial hyperresponsiveness (DRS 18 compared to group 1: 11 and group 3: 2.5) (p = 0.023). Group 2 had a higher prevalence of anaphylaxis compared to group 1 and group 3 (p = 0.001). There was no significant difference in ACT between the three groups (p = 0.26) or eosinophils (p = 0.053).

Conclusion

Children with asthma who are sensitized to both airborne allergen and food have an increased bronchial hyperresponsiveness and signs of a more pronounced airway inflammation compared to children with only airway allergy. The results suggest that more intense asthma treatment is needed for these children.

D30

Improving medication adherence during the Diagnostic-Therapeutic–Educational Pathway IOEASMA: a real life study of 1164 children

Sebastiano Guarnaccia*, Valeria Gretter, Ada Pluda, Malica Frassine, Emanuele D’Agata, Sara Griffini, Cristina Quecchia

“Io e l’Asma” Center, University Hospital Brescia, Brescia, Italy

Correspondence: Sebastiano Guarnaccia - Guarnaccia.s@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D30

Introduction

GINA asthma guidelines highlight the importance of optimizing medication adherence with a view to improving clinical outcomes. Although medication adherence is the key for optimal benefit of all pharmacological treatments.

Methods

Consecutive children, aged from 0 to 17 years old, were enrolled following the Diagnostic Therapeutic Education Pathway IOEASMA, that including three clinical visits at 8–12 weeks intervals and 2 follow-up visits at 6-month intervals, with a primary care evaluation between visits.

After the first visit the patient and their parents received an educational course managed by a healthcare assistant. The period of the study is from 1 June 2016 to 30 March 2017.

Before each clinical visit we checked adherence with a specific questionnaire/interview.

Results

1164 children were divided in three ages 0–5 (256 patients), 6–11 (605 patients), 12–17 (303 patients) years old. The nationality of patients was: Italians n° 960 (82.5%), other nationalities n° 204 (17.5%).

At first visit 274 patients answered the following: they had their medication upon them in 74 patients (26.6%) and their spacer devices in 60 (21.9%), 111 (40.5%) had daily therapy, and the correct usage of medication and devices in this group was 56 patients (50.5%).

At third visit 212 patients answered as following: they had their medication upon them in 110 patients (51.9%) and their spacer devices in 93 (43.9%), 156 (73.6%) had daily therapy, and the correct usage of medication and devices in this group was 148 patients (94.9%).

At fourth–fifth visit 215 patients, with 318 records, answered as following: they had their medication upon them in 149 patients (46.9%) and their spacer devices in 120 (37.7%), 255 (80.2%) had daily therapy, and the correct usage of medication and devices in this group was 228 patients (89.4%).

After the sixth visit 448 patients, with 580 records, answered as following: they had their medication upon them in 265 patients (45.7%) and their spacer devices in 215 (37%), 470 (81%) had daily therapy, and the correct usage of medication and devices in this group was 419 patients (89.1%).

Conclusion

This real life study demonstrated the difference in medication adherence during the IOEASMA pathway. The data suggest how the educational intervention, after the first visit, and following the path, enhanced the adherence from 50.5% at first visit to 94.9% at third visit. We noticed that this improvement remains stable over time at 89.4–89.1% after 6 months and longer.

D31

Evaluating the impact of staff education on asthma first-aid knowledge and first-aid skills performance in primary schools

Kate Luckie1*, Bandana Saini1, Yien Yien Soo1,2, Vicky Kritikos1,3, Jack Collins1, Rebekah Jane Moles1

1Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Sydney, Australia; 2National Prescribing Service, Sydney, Australia; 3Woolcock Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, Australia

Correspondence: Kate Luckie - kate.luckie@sydney.edu.au

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D31

Introduction

Improvements in the knowledge and skills associated with Asthma First-Aid (AFA) could reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with asthma. Research has shown that 45%of people did not receive medical assistance in their final fatal asthma attack [1]. To assess AFA training the skills required to treat an acute exacerbation of asthma should be assessed alongside AFA knowledge. Our research explored AFA education in primary school staff by comparing the effectiveness of AFA skills-based scenario training to conventional asthma education.

Methods

Nineteen primary schools (204 participants) were allocated to one of three arms to compare AFA knowledge and AFA skills. The scenario-based skills assessment required the participant to sit with the educator and describe how they would manage a child having a severe exacerbation of asthma using the AFA equipment provided. Conventional asthma training was a didactic oral presentation. Arm 1 underwent conventional asthma training, arm 2 underwent scenario based training and arm 3 had a combination of the two. Each participant was followed up at 3 weeks and again between 3 and 7 months after the first visit.

Results

AFA skills improved significantly from baseline for those study arms who received scenario based training (arms 2 and 3) and was sustained over time. There was a significant difference in AFA skills between study arm 1 (77.3%) and study arms 2 and 3 (91.5 and 91.1%) (p = 0.000). After study arm 1 received the scenario-based training the mean skill score increased to 90% at visit 3 which was comparable to the other two study arms. AFA knowledge improved significantly in all study arms with no differences seen between arms.

Conclusion

Scenario-based training was superior to conventional training for AFA skills. There was no significant difference in AFA knowledge with scenario-based training versus the conventional asthma training.

Reference
  1. 1.

    Levy ML, Winter R. Asthma deaths: what now? Thorax. 2015;70(3):209–10.

     

D32

Knowledge and attitude towards pediatric asthma of health care practitioners (KAAP)

Roy Subhasis1*, Halder Indranil2, Ghosh Subhajit3

1Consultant pediatrician, Columbia Asia Hospital Kolkata, India; 2Consultant and Associate Professor, JNU university, Kalyani, West Bengal, India; 3Cipla respiratory, Mumbai, India

Correspondence: Roy Subhasis - roysubha2006@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D32

Introduction

Childhood asthma is a major public health problem. There has been limited research into physician perception and attitude towards pediatric asthma in India.

The objective is to assess the knowledge, attitude and behaviour of three groups of health care practitioners, i.e. Pediatric pulmonologist, pediatrician and general practitioner towards pediatric asthma.

Methods

This is an observational cross-sectional survey of knowledge, attitude and behavior of health care practitioners through online self-administered questionnaire. Total 719 responses obtained from across India.

Results

Participants were distributed as follows General Physician 1%, General Pediatricians 82%, and Pediatric Pulmonologists 17%. Most responders (54%) stated that prevalence pre-school wheezing is 16–30%. Suspected/confirmed asthma in general practice is < 15% in pediatric age group (56%). According to 58% responders October to December has highest number of wheezy children. Bronchodilators prescribed in cough and cold (24%), in rhonchi (32%) and recurrent cough (38%). Recurrent cough (70%) followed by recurrent wheeze (23%) is the most common presenting symptoms in pediatric asthma. Asthma is mostly diagnosed clinically (626). 51% doctors stated that GINA guidelines is not that useful. Only 17% responders mentioned maternal smoking avoidance for primary prevention of childhood asthma with breast feeding (71%) is most common response. Around 19% participant reported growth retardation with inhaled corticosteroids. While initiating inhaler therapy more than 40% doctors spend < 10 min to counsel. Around 12% responders also used Peak Flow Meter in below 5 years. Around 20% of Device and inhalation technique demonstration done by unskilled personnel. For routine inhalation 9% still preferred nebulizer in below 5 years and Over 5 years almost 10% of doctors prefer nebulizer and MDI without spacer. In 5 years and above MDI with spacer (74%) is preferred route to deliver bronchodilator but almost 10% also used non-inhalational routes. Almost one-fourth (24%) prefer nebulizer to treat wheezy child under 6 years. In 5 years and above MDI with spacer (54%) followed by MDI with spacer and mask (36%) is preferred choice for inhaled steroid delivery. Levosalbutamol (59%) is preferred over salbutamol (40%). Almost 21% responders are unaware of dose in one salbutamol actuation. Budesonide (93%) is most preferred molecule. In one-third of patient’s moderate dose of budesonide equivalent prescribed. Around 17% prescriber still advise patients to buy nebulizer. Around 93% preferred valve spacer with rest either non-valve or no preference.

Conclusion

This countrywide survey showed there are gaps in knowledge, discrepancy in practice and attitude towards pediatric asthma.

D33

Evaluating acute asthma management at Red Cross Children’s Hospital, South Africa

Naidoo Shirani1*, Buys Heloise1, Kang Kristopher2

1University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; 2University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada

Correspondence: Naidoo Shirani - shirani.naidoo@uct.ac.za

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D33

Introduction

SA has traditionally had high rates of mortality and morbidity related to Acute Severe Asthma. With improving access to care, we have re-evaluated the presentation and management of children with Acute Severe Asthma at our facility.

Methods

A retrospective chart review of patients with asthma < 13 years, with physician diagnosed asthma, triaged “Red “(i.e. requiring immediate medical attention), presenting to the Medical Emergency Unit between 01/01/2013 to 31/12/2013. Patients with any chronic underlying lung disease were excluded.

Results

95 patients were seen in 2013 (48 male, 47 female), who were predominantly 2–8 years of age, with an increased admission rate from April to October, and a large month to month variation. The highest frequency of presentations was from 0600 to 1200 hours, and the majority of patients presented directly from home, bypassing primary care facilities. Bronchodilators were started in 94 of 95 patients (1 exclusion due to inadequate notes). Fenoterol was the first line agent, with Ipratropium bromide used in 90 patients. The most common method of administration was continuous fenoterol and iprotropium nebulisations. (71.7% of patients). 44% of patients completed 3 SAB2nebulisations optimally (within first hour of treatment) and a further 21%received 3 nebulisations outside this time frame. 83% of patients received systemic steroids immediately, the majority via the oral route. There was high usage of antibiotics (40%) and chest XRays (82%), despite a 2% yield of an unexpected result on CXR. Additional treatment modalities were commonly required, such as IV Magnesium Sulphate (24%) and IV Salbutomol (21%), with no adverse effects noted. Respiratory support was predominantly non-invasive (2 patients commenced on HiFlo Oxygen, 10 commenced on CPAP and 1 patient requiring emergency intubation and ventilation). None of the children commenced on non-invasive support required escalation to IPPV during their illness.

Conclusion

The majority of patients presented during the day and bypassed primary care. They generally received continuous nebulisation with 3 doses of aSAB2 agent and Ipratropium (although the timing of doses can be expedited). There was 0% mortality, with only onepatient requiringintubation and ventilation. We have used modalities such as IVMagnesium sulphate, salbutomoland non- invasive respiratory support safely and effectively in the Emergency Unit in a resource constrained setting.

D34

Asthma management policies in Australian primary schools: are we doing enough?

Kate Luckie1*, Rebekah Jane Moles1, Vicky Kritikos1,2, Bandana Saini1

1Faculty of Pharmacy, the University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; 2Woolcock Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, Australia

Correspondence: Kate Luckie - kate.luckie@sydney.edu.au

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D34

Introduction

At least 2 out of every 25 students in Australian classrooms have a diagnosis of asthma, hence it’s vital that schools have policies and procedures to deal with asthma management issues. The aim of our research was to explore how national and state (Macro) policies were interpreted and implemented within primary (elementary) schools.

Methods

Semi- structured interviews were conducted with 12 primary (elementary) school principals. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim, subsequently undergoing thematic content analysis.

Results

Recurrent themes were found to fall under three headings: Asthma training, communication about asthma management and access to reliever medicines within the school. Mandatory asthma training was insufficient to equip staff to deal with asthma emergencies and there was a lack of direction regarding communication processes across all schools. The size of the school tended to dictate the process. Access to individual rescue inhalers was more restricted in the larger schools. In5 of the 12 schools emergency rescue medication was kept with the teacher on duty.

Conclusion

Macro policies tended to offer too much flexibility. There could be potential for improved health outcomes with macro policies facilitating greater involvement of the health care sector, the school staff and the parent.

D35

Nasal obstruction is significantly improved after treatment with n/s Mometasone furoate in children with allergic rhinitis as indicated by Acoustic Rhinometry (AcR) and Visual Analog Scale (VAS) measurements

Marialena Kyriakakou1, Olympia Tsilochristou1,2*, Maria Dimou1, Vicky Xepapadaki1, Nikos Papadopoulos1,3, Nikos Douladiris1

1Children’s Allergy Department, 2nd Pediatric Clinic, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece; 2Division of Allergy, Asthma and Lung Biology, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom; 3Division of Infection, Immunity and Respiratory Medicine, The University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom

Correspondence: Olympia Tsilochristou - ol.tsilochristou@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D35

Introduction

Nasal obstruction is common in children with allergic rhinitis (AR). Such obstruction may be evaluated subjectively by a visual analog scale (VAS) or objectively by measuring the nasal cavity area by Acoustic Rhinometry (AcR) and evaluating the minimum cross-sectional area (MCA). Intranasal corticosteroids (INSs) such as mometasone are recommended as first line therapy for allergic rhinitis especially when nasal blockage is the major concern, however, data in children are few. The aim of this study was to explore the efficacy of mometasone treatment by using the VAS and AcR, in children with allergic rhinitis.

Methods

The study population was recruited among children complaining for nasal blockage while attending the Rhinitis Outpatient Clinic of the Allergy Unit, “P. and A. Kyriakou” Children’s Hospital, Athens, Greece during 2016–2017. Children completed a VAS and underwent AcR at a first visit (Day 1) and after treatment with mometasone, 1 puff/nostril, once daily for 15 days (Day 16). AcR was performed with the A1 Acoustic Rhinometer, (GM INSTRUMENTS LTD, Kilwinning, UK) and the minimum cross-sectional area (MCA) was evaluated. Statistical analysis was done with SPSS v.23.0. Results are expressed as the mean and standard deviation, with p < 0.05 set as significant.

Results

Fifty-six children (22 boys/16 controls-no treatment), aged 6–9 years were evaluated. No change in both VAS and MCA Day 1 vs. VAS and MCA Day 16; respectively, was observed in children who did not comply to the mometasone treatment (control group). In contrast, those receiving the medication achieved reduction of nasal obstruction as indicated by both VAS and AcR, compared to both baseline values and the control group (no treatment). VAS Day 1 vs. VAS Day 16 was significantly higher (VAS: 7.9235 cm ± 0.923 vs. 0.930 cm ± 1.033 respectively; p < 0.001) (Fig. 1). Additionally, MCA was significantly improved in both nostrils after treatment. (MCA right nostril Day1 vs. day 16: 0.65 cm3 ± 0.74 vs. 1.01 cm3 ± 0.71 respectively; p < 0.001 and MCA left nostril Day1 vs. Day 16: 0.60 cm3 ± 0.38 vs. 1.16 cm3 ± 0.45 respectively; p < 0.001) (Fig. 2).
Fig. 1
Fig. 1

VAS means before and after mometasone treatment

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Effects of mometasone treatment in MCA means

Conclusion

The effectiveness of mometasone treatment for nasal obstruction in children with allergic rhinitis was confirmed by both AcR and VAS measurements.

D36

The investigation of the role of IL-21 and IL-33 in the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis

Neriman Aydin1*, Işıl Bakis2, Ceren Gunel3, Buket Demirci4, Mete Eyigor5

1Adnan Menderes University Medical Faculty Department of Medical Microbiology, Aydın, Turkey; 2Adnan Menderes University Institute of Health Sciences, Aydın, Turkey; 3Adnan Menderes University Medical Faculty Department of Ear Nose andThroat, Aydın, Turkey; 4Adnan Menderes University Medical Faculty Department of Medical Pharmacology Aydın, Turkey; 5Akdeniz University Medical Faculty Department of Medical Microbiology, Antalya, Turkey

Correspondence: Neriman Aydin - nkaydin@adu.edu.tr

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D36

Introduction

Allergic rhinitis is an inflammatory disease of nasal mucous membrane by immunoglobuin E (IgE)-mediated (allergic) reaction to aeroallergens.1 It was found that several cytokines are involved in the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis 2, 3. In this study, it was aimed to investigate the role of IL-21 and IL-33 in allergic rhinitis by using a rat model.

Methods

A total of 21 rats were included in this study in three groups: (1) rats with allergic rhinitis, (2) rats with allergic rhinitis and corticosteroid (3) the control group. 4 Rats were anesthetized with xylazine-ketamine anesthesia and samples were taken. The levels of IgE, OVA sIgE, IL-21 and IL-33 were investigated in serum samples, and IL-21 and IL-33 levels were investigated in tissue samples by Enzyme Immune Assay (EIA) method.

Results

The IL-33 levels in tissue were found to be statistically higher in both allergic rhinitis (p = 0048) and corticosteroid + allergic rhinitis groups (p = 0.035) compared to the control group. Despite the lack of statistically significant difference in IL-21 tissue levels between the groups, the tissue levels in both allergic rhinitis and corticosteroids + allergic rhinitis groups were found to be higher than the control group. IgE levels in serum in the control group was found significantly higher than both the levels in allergic rhinitis group (p = 0.009) and corticosteroid + allergic rhinitis group (p = 0.011). Contrary to the serum IgE levels, OVA sIgE serum level was found to be the lowest in control group, however the difference was not statistically significant.

Conclusion

It is concluded that IL-33 and IL-21 have a role in the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis; they are synthesized in higher levels in tissues with allergic rhinitis. Additionally, it is suggested that IL-21 has a role in downwards regulation of serum IgE levels.

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    Eifan AO, Durham SR. Pathogenesis of rhinitis. Clin Exp Allergy. 2016;46(9):1139–51.

     
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    Glück J, Rymarczyk B, Rogala B. Serum IL-33 but not ST2 level is elevated in intermittent allergic rhinitis and is a marker of the disease severity. Inflammation Research 2012, 5, 547–50.

     
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    Wang M1, Zhang W, Shang J, Yang J, Zhang L, Bachert C. Immunomodulatory effects of IL-23 and IL-17 in a mouse model of allergic rhinitis. Clin Exp Allergy. 2013;43(8):956–66.

     
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    Haenuki Y, Matsushita K, Futatsugi-Yumikura S, Ishii KJ, Tatsukata K, Yoshimasa I, Shigeharu F, Yasuda M, et al. A critical role of IL-33 in experimental allergic rhinitis. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2012, 130, 184–94

     

D37

Angiogenic factors in exhaled breath condensate—possible markers of disease progression in children with asthma

Katarzyna Grzela1*, Malgorzata Litwiniuk2, Alicja Krejner2, Wioletta Zagorska1, Tomasz Grzela2

1Department of Pediatrics, Pneumonology and Allergology, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland; 2Department of Histology and Embryology, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland

Correspondence: Katarzyna Grzela - katarzyna.grzela@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D37

Introduction

Asthma is common chronic inflammatory disease of respiratory tract. Exacerbations of clinical symptoms and increased disease severity are associated with structural and functional changes in respiratory tract known as remodeling. Apart from hyperplasia of smooth myocytes and mucosal cells, as well as extracellular matrix enhancement in sub-epithelial mucosa, these changes include also some neo-vascularization. However, detailed role of angiogenesis in asthma-associated remodeling remains unclear.

Diagnostics and monitoring of asthma, especially in its early stages, are still difficult. Functional tests, e.g. spirometry, are often impossible to perform in some patients, particularly in young children. For this reason, there is strong need for new diagnostic approaches, of low invasiveness and not requiring patient cooperation. One of such methods is analysis of exhaled breath condensate (EBC).

Methods

In our study we analyzed 23 samples of breath condensates: 6 from severe asthma children, 8from mild asthma and 9 control samples from healthy children. For assessment we have used proteome profiler, the protein microarray dedicated to detect 55 angiogenesis-related factors.

Results

We have found that tested EBC samples contained several angiogenesis-related factors, including thrombospondin (TSP)-1, angiogenin (ANG), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiopoetin-2 (Ang)-2, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMP)-1. All EBC samples from mild asthma and control groups revealed moderate signals corresponding to TSP-1. Small quantities of Ang-2 were found in EBC samples from mild asthma patients. In EBC samples from severe asthma we have found high levels of TSP-1, ANG, TIMP-1 and MMP-9.

Conclusions

We have shown for the first time, that exhaled breath condensates of asthma children contained broad spectrum of angiogenesis-related factors. Thus, our results support previous suggestions, that asthma progression is accompanied by significant changes in molecular network, which may be involved in angiogenesis control in respiratory tract. Moreover, we have demonstrated that those factors may effectively be studied in EBC using novel protein microarray.

D38

Pharmacokinetics of tiotropium in patients aged 6–11 years with moderate asthma following administration via the Respimat® inhaler

Ashish Sharma1, Sabrina Wiebe1, Stanley Szefler2, René Aalbers3, Eckard Hamelmann4, Stanley Goldstein5, Michael Engel6, Petra Moroni-Zentgraf7, Christian Vogelberg8

1Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH and Co. KG, Biberach, Germany; 2Children’s Hospital Colorado; University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Denver, Colorado, United States of America; 3Martini Hospital, Van Swietenplein 1, Groningen, Netherlands; 4Evangelisches Krankenhaus Bielefeld GmbH, Malvenstrasse 12, Bielefeld, Germany; 5Goldstein Stanley Asthma Care of Long Island, Rockville Centre, New York, New York, United States of America; 6Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH and Co. KG, Ingelheim, Germany; 7Boehringer Ingelheim Pty Ltd, Sydney, Australia; 8University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University of Dresden, Dresden, Germany

Correspondence: Eckhardt Michael - michael.eckhardt@meditechmedia.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D38

Introduction

Tiotropium Respimat® has been demonstrated to be efficacious and well tolerated as add-on to maintenance inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) ± additional controller therapy in children aged 6–11 years with moderate and severe asthma. The pharmacokinetic (PK) properties of tiotropium have been reported in adult and adolescent patients, but the PK of tiotropium in children with moderate persistent asthma requires elucidation. We studied single- and multiple-dose PK characteristics of tiotropium in patients aged 6–11 years with moderate persistent asthma (NCT01383499).

Methods

PK parameters of tiotropium were evaluated in plasma and urine samples using a subset of patients in a Phase II, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, incomplete crossover trial of tiotropium; additionally, some patients who were not part of the subset consented to the 24-hour urine collection resulting in more urine data than plasma data. Overall, 24 patients were included who received tiotropium at 2.5 μg, or 5 μg as two puffs delivered by the Respimat® inhaler once daily in the evening, added on to at least ICS (leukotriene modifiers were permitted throughout the trial).PK were determined after the first dose (first treatment only) and after 4 weeks of dosing.

Results

Tiotropium was rapidly absorbed following oral inhalation with a median tmax,ss following multiple dosing over 4 weeks ranging between 4.1 and 4.7 min for the two dose groups. An average of 3.17–4.32% of the nominal dose was excreted unchanged in the urine over 24 h post-single dose. At steady state, urinary excretion was 1.7 to 3.2-fold higher than post-single dose, and renal clearance was 278–358 mL/minute. Tiotropium exposure increased in an approximately dose proportional manner. PK parameters after multiple dosing are presented in Table 1.
Table 1

PK parameters after multiple dosing of tiotropium delivered by the Respimat® inhaler in children aged 6–11 years with moderate asthma

Parameter

Unit

Tiotropium Respimat 2.5 µg

Tiotropium Respimat 5 µg

N

gMean

gCV [%]

N

gMean

gCV [%]

AUC0–1,ss

pg h/mL

3

2.08

31.7

5

3.04

38.3

Cmax,ss

pg/mL

6

2.42

48.7

5

4.10

97.2

Cpre,ss

pg/mL

   

3

1.82

13.4

tmax,ss*

min

6

4.1*

3.2–5.0*

5

4.7*

3.5–5.8*

CLR0–3,ss

mL/min

3

358

7.06

4

278

17.9

RA, Ae0–24

 

11

3.43

115

12

1.71

126

fe0–3,ss

%

11

2.88

48.3

12

2.02

65.2

fe0–24,ss

%

11

10.3

62.7

12

7.39

86.3

*Median, minimum–maximum. Ae0–24 = amount of tiotropium that was eliminated unchanged in urine from 0 to 24 h; AUC0–1,ss = area under the curve from 0 to 1 h at steady state; Cmax,ss = maximum measured concentration of the analyte in plasma at steady state; Cpre,ss = pre-dose steady state concentration of the analyte in plasma immediately before administration of the next drug administration; CLR,0–3,ss = renal clearance of tiotropium in plasma from 0 to 3 h at steady state; fe0–3 ss = fraction of tiotropium dose excreted in urine from 0 to 3 h at steady state; fe0–24,ss = fraction of tiotropium dose excreted in urine from 0 to 24 h post-dose at steady state; gCV = geometric coefficient of variation; gMean = geometric mean; RA,0–24 = accumulation ratio from 0 to 24 h; tmax,ss = time from dosing to maximum tiotropium plasma concentration at steady state

Conclusion

These data establish the PK of tiotropium Respimat® following administration of a single dose and at steady state in children aged 6–11 years with moderate asthma. Overall, the pattern of absorption, exposure and clearance at steady state was comparable in this age group to that previously published for adolescents and adults.

D39

In vitro and clinical characterisation of the antistatic valved holding chamber AeroChamber Plus® Flow-Vu® for administrating tiotropium Respimat® in 1–5-year-old children with persistent asthmatic symptoms

Herbert Wachtel1, Mark Nagel2, Michael Engel1, Georges El Azzi1, Ashish Sharma3, Jason Suggett2

1Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH and Co. KG, Ingelheim, Germany; 2Trudell Medical International, London, Ontario, Canada; 3Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH and Co. KG, Biberach, Germany

Correspondence: Eckhardt Michael - michael.eckhardt@meditechmedia.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D39

Introduction

When characterising any inhalation product, a comprehensive assessment including in vitro, pharmacokinetic (PK), as well as clinical results is required. We therefore assessed tiotropium Respimat® when administered with the AeroChamber Plus® Flow-Vu® antistatic valved holding chamber (test VHC) using in vitro and PK data, as well as clinical results in 1–5-year-olds with persistent asthmatic symptoms.

Methods

We evaluated tiotropium delivered into a cascade impactor under fixed pediatric flow rates with and without holding times in the test VHC. Tidal breathing simulations and an ADAM-III Child Model were employed to assess the tiotropium mass likely to reach the lungs of preschool children when Respimat® was administered with the test VHC. Clinical characterisation was based on a 12-week, double-blind, randomised, parallel-group trial of once-daily tiotropium Respimat® or placebo as add-on to background therapy in 1–5-year-olds with persistent asthmatic symptoms (NCT01634113). PK data on systemic exposure to tiotropium Respimat® administered with test VHC in preschool children was compared with pooled data from nine trials in older patients with symptomatic persistent asthma not using VHCs (NCT01383499/NCT01122680/NCT01233284/NCT01152450/NCT01696071/NCT00772538/NCT00776984/NCT01172808/NCT01172821).

Results

In vitro emitted mass decreased with lower flow conditions, indicating age-dependent dose reduction. In terms of dose per kg/body weight, delivered dosing at flow rates corresponding to preschool children was comparable to that at flow rates corresponding to older children (Table 1).
Table 1

In vitro medication delivery through the test VHC with small/medium face masks at different flow rates and holding times

Flow rate and corresponding age

Mask

Holding time, s

Mean medication delivery through test VHC, μg/dose

Body weight 50th percentile, kg

Medication delivered per dose, ng/kg*

4.9 L/min (6–12 months)

Small

0

0.85 (± 0.04)

7.5–9.9

86–113

2

0.86 (± 0.14)

87–115

5

0.55 (± 0.16)

56–73

10

0.62 (± 0.02)

63–83

8.0 L/min (2–5 years)

Medium

0

0.74 (± 0.05)

12.3–18.0

41–60

2

0.93 (± 0.05)

52–76

5

0.72 (± 0.07)

40–59

10

0.57 (± 0.05)

32–46

12.0 L/min (> 5 years)

Medium

0

1.16 (± 0.07)

18.0

64

2

0.96 (± 0)

53

5

0.78 (± 0.18)

43

10

0.61 (± 0.02)

34

Data corresponding to age group 13–23 months are not available

*Inhalation of 2.5 µg tiotropium Respimat® (as two actuations) in a 70 kg adult without use of the test VHC and face mask delivers approximately 2.5 μg or 36 ng/kg

Transmission and holding properties of tiotropium Respimat® administered with the test VHC were fully sufficient for aerosol delivery of patients. Standardised tidal inhalation resulted in emitted mass from the test VHC of approximately one-third of labelled dose, independent of coordination and use of face mask, indicating predictable tiotropium administration by Respimat® when used with the test VHC. Data generated from the anatomically correct ADAM-III model correlated well with standardised tidal breathing results, both in terms of total mass delivered and the mass delivered to filter (available to the lungs). In separate clinical trials, tiotropium exposure in 1–5-year-old patients using the test VHC, adjusted by height or body surface, was comparable with that observed in older patients who did not use VHCs; no overexposure was observed. The safety profile of tiotropium Respimat® in 1–5-year-old patients was comparable to placebo.

Conclusion

This study supports administration of tiotropium Respimat® with the AeroChamber Plus® Flow-Vu® test VHC in 1–5-year-old children with persistent asthmatic symptoms.

D40

Potential immunomodulation effect of nigella sativa on peripheral blood eosinophil count, serum IgE level and improvement of clinical manifestation in asthmatic children

Wisnu Barlianto1,2*, Muhammad Irawan1,2, Desy Wulandari1,2

1Allergy-Immunology Division, Pediatric Department, Faculty of Medicine, Brawijaya University, Malang, Indonesia; 2Saiful Anwar General Hospital, Malang, Indonesia

Correspondence: Wisnu Barlianto - wisnu_barlian@yahoo.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D40

Introduction

One of the important goal of asthma treatment is to control the disease. Poor compliance with conventional asthma medications remains a major problem in achieving asthma control. It has been reported that black seed or Nigella sativa provides anti-inflammatory and anti-allergy activities. This study was aimed to investigate the effect of Nigella sativa as adjunctive therapy on peripheral blood eosinophil count, serum IgE level and clinical manifestation in asthmatic children.

Methods

A randomized, single blind-controlled trial involving twenty-eight children with asthma was done in Saiful Anwar General Hospital, Indonesia. All patients were given therapy according to standard treatment guidelines of asthma. Nigella sativa oil (NSO) were given as supplementary treatment at dose of 15–30 mg/kg/day for 8 week in treatment groups. Peripheral blood eosinophil count and serum IgE level were measured before and after treatment. Improvement of clinical manifestation was accessed by Asthma Control Test (ACT) Score.

Results

After 8 weeks of treatment, NSO group showed a significant reduction in blood eosinophils (6.89 ± 2.916% vs. 4.89 ± 1.546%, p = 0.038) and serum IgE level (703.88 ± 390.438 IU/ml vs. 385.98 ± 214.479 IU/ml, p = 0.034) compared to control group. There was no different of mean ACT score in both groups (20.29 ± 1.816 vs. 19.36 ± 1.151, p = 0.413). But there was significant improvement of ACT score between pre and post treatment in NSO group (16.57 ± 2.533 vs. 20.29 ± 1.816, p = 0.000). ACT score was associated with peripheral blood eosinophil count (p = 0.049, r = − 0.375) and serum IgE level (p = 0.001, r = − 0.587) in NSO group.

Conclusion

This study demonstrated that supplementation of Nigella sativa improves biochemical parameters and clinical manifestation in children with asthma.

D43

Neonatal antibiotic treatment increases the risk of asthma at age 12 years

Emma Goksör*, Frida Strömberg-Celind, Bernt Alm, Per Möllborg, Nils Åberg, Göran Wennergren

Department of Pediatrics, Institution of Clinical Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden

Correspondence: Emma Goksör - emma.goksor@vgregion.se

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D43

Introduction

Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases in children. Disturbed microbiotica can affect the development of the immune system and thus the risk of asthma and allergy. Aims and objectives: To study the prevalence of and risk factors for asthma at 12 years and examine whether there were different risk factors for atopic compared to non-atopic asthma.

Methods

Data were obtained from a longitudinal cohort study of children born in 2003 in Sweden. The parents answered questionnaires from the age of 6 months until 12 years. We also obtained data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register. The response rate at age 12 years was 76% of those to whom the questionnaire was distributed (3637/4777), 64% of the 5654 included at admission in 2003.

Results

At 12 years of age, 6.4% reported current doctor-diagnosed asthma. Of these, 65% had atopic asthma and 35% non-atopic asthma. Risk factors are presented in Table 1.
Table 1

Adjusted odds ratios to be diagnosed with any asthma, atopic asthma, and non-atopic asthma at 12 years age

Risk factor

Any asthma aOR (95% CI) (n = 3622)

Atopic asthma aOR (95% CI) (n = 3540)

Non-atopic asthma aOR (95% CI) (n = 3471)

Neonatal antibiotics

1.9 (1.1–3.2)

2.2 (1.2–4.2)

1.4 (0.5–3.4)

Small for gastational age

2.6 (1.1–5.9)

2.3 (0.9–6.3)

3.8 (1.1–13.7)

Breastfeeding

1.2 (0.8–1.7)

1.1 (0.7–1.9)

0.5 (0.3–0.95)

Parental asthma

2.6 (1.9–3.7)

2.5 (1.7–3.6)

3.0 (1.7–5.0)

Food allergy first year of life

2.2 (1.3–3.7)

3.0 (1.8–5.1)

0.6 (0.1–2.5)

Conclusions

Neonatal antibiotic treatment increased the risk of atopic asthma at the age of 12 years. This suggests an immune-mediated effect. To be born SGA increased, while at least 4 months of breastfeeding decreased the risk of non-atopic asthma at the age of 12.

D44

How are asthmatic children doing? Follow-up and outcomes of a cohort seen in specialist clinics after 4 years

Marco Lozano Nuria1*, Moral Gil Luis2, Toral Pérez Teresa2, García Avilés Belén3, Caballero Caballero María4, Huertas Sánchez Ana4, González Toro Cristina5, Olivas Monteagudo Francisca5, Martínez Rovira Patricia3, Atienza Almarcha Teresa3, Rico Rodes Ángela2, Jordán Garcia Alfredo2

1Department of Pediatrics, Hospital Vega Baja, Orihuela, Spain; 2Paediatic Respiratory and Allergy Unit, Hospital General Universitario de Alicante, Alicante, Spain; 3Department of Pediatrics, Hospital Clínico Universitario de San Juan, Alicante, Spain; 4Department of Pediatrics, Hospital Vinalopó, Elche, Spain; 5Department of Pediatrics, Hospital General Universitario de Elda, Elda, Spain

Correspondence: Marco Lozano Nuria - numalo27@hotmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D44

Introduction

The objective of this study was to investigate the characteristics and the evolution of an asthmatic children cohort attended in specialist clinics.

Methods

A retrospective review of a cohort of patients first seen with asthma in 2012 within 5 different Hospitals. Clinical history data were used regarding patients characteristics, number of visits, treatment and level of control over the following 4 years.

Results

656 patients, 62% male; median age of 5 years at the first visit with an interquartile range of 3–8 years; median age of 1 year at onset of first symptoms with an interquartile range of 0–3 years. 72% were considered atopic: 65% aeroallergen sensitization, 47% allergic rhinitis, 24% atopic dermatitis and 14% food allergies.

After 4 years, 26% of the patients continued follow-up, as a result of discharges or non-attendance at clinic.

Amongst the patients who continued follow-up over the 4 years, 33–48% did not require maintenance treatment, antileukotriene was reduced from 46 to 23%, low or medium doses of inhaled corticosteroidswere used by 21–25% and highdose of inhaled corticosteroids±long-acting beta2-agonists were required by 1–6%. Immunotherapy was prescribed to 21% of patients. Between 28 and 35% remained in clinical remission, 51–60% showed good asthma control, 11–15% had partial control and 0–1% poor control.

112 patients (17%) suffered “difficult” asthma, defined by the need for multiple visits, highdose of inhaled corticosteroids±long-acting beta2-agonists, or with poor control of their asthma. There were no differences based on age or sex, but they were more commonlyatopic patients (84–70%, p = 0.003), treated with immunotherapy (54–15%, p < 0.001) and continued followed-up over the 4 years (75–16%, p < 0.001). 2 patients received omalizumab.

Conclusions

The majority of patients improved with age and stopped being seen by specialist, but at least a quarter needed continuous specialised follow-up and 17% had “difficult” asthma, although poorly controlled asthma was uncommon.

D45

Viral status in asthmatic preschool children during a severe exacerbation: the VIRASTHMA 2 study

Stéphanie Lejeune1*, Ilka Engelmann2, Anny Dewilde2, Rodrigue Dessein3, Guillaume Pouessel4, Heloise Ducoin5, Sarah Mitha5, Céline Delvart6, Caroline Thumerelle7, Clémence Mordacq7, Muriel Pichavant8, Philippe Gosset8, Antoine Deschildre7

1CHU Lille, Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergy Department. Hôpital Jeanne de Flandre, Université Lille, France; 2Virology laboratory, EA3610, CHU Lille, Université Lille, Lille, France; 3Bacteriology Departement, CHU Lille, Université Lille, Lille, France; 4Pediatric Departement, CH Roubaix V. Provo, Roubaix, France; 5Pediatric Departement, CH Lens E. Schaffner, Lens, France; 6Pediatric Departement, CH Arras, Arras, France; 7CHU Lille, Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergy Department. Hôpital Jeanne de Flandre, Université Lille, Lille, France; 8Lung infection and innate immunity—Center for infection and immunity in Lille, INSERM 1019, Lille, France

Correspondence: Stéphanie Lejeune - lejeunestephanie86@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D45

Introduction

During an exacerbation of asthma in preschool children (< 5 years), viruses, especially rhinoviruses (hRV) are the main triggers of an inflammatory process, leading to clinical symptoms. Previous works have formulated the hypothesis that these patients have a deficient innate immune response to these pathogens, enabling reinfection. The main purpose of the VIRASTHMA 2 study is to describe the inflammatory profile during and after the resolution of a severe exacerbation. This work focuses on microbiological status.

Methods

Multicentric prospective study in the Haut-de-France region (France). Asthmatic children aged 1–5 years, were included during a hospitalization for a severe exacerbation. Clinical history, atopic status, viral status (PCR in a nasal swab sample, hRV typing by amplification of the viral protein (VP) 2/VP4 region), bacteriological status (culture of an induced sputum) were assessed during the exacerbation and at steady state, 8 weeks later. We describe the first 105 patients.

Results

During exacerbation, a virus was identified in 93% of cases, a hRV in 74% (R + patients), an enterovirus in 13%, an adenovirus in 11%, a respiratory syncithial virus in 7%, a viral co-infection in 27%. Among R + patients, hRVC was found in 77%, hRVA in 23%, no hRVB was found. We observed a higher median PRAM severity score at admission in R + patients versus patients infected with another virus (6 vs. 4, p = 0.004) but no difference in the median length of hospitalization. There was no difference in the prevalence of severe intermittent asthma (26% vs. 24%, p = 1), a trend toward a higher prevalence of atopy (positive prick tests and/or specific IgE) in R + patients (59% vs. 31%, p = 0.053). Among the 67 performed bacteriological cultures, 60% were positive, identifying Haemophilus influenzae (n = 25), Moraxella catarrhalis (n = 20), and Streptococcus pneumonia (n = 12). In all, 37 patients (55%) had a viral/bacterial co-infection. At steady state, 52% were R + , hRVA in 65%, hRVC in 23%, hRVB in 12%. Among these patients, only 28% had clinical signs of viral infection. In all, 35% of patients were R + at exacerbation and at steady state, none of them were infected with the same hRV type at both times.

Conclusion

We confirm a high prevalence of hRV infection, especially hRVC, during exacerbation of asthma in young children, frequently associated with a bacteriological carriage or infection. At steady state, virus carriage was frequently observed. Exploring the host immune innate responses could help better understanding the pathogenic role of these microorganisms.

D47

The association between sensitisation to house dust mite and food allergy in infants with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis

Aideen Byrne1*, Maeve McAleer2, Siobhan Pyper3

1Allergy Department, Our Lady’s Children’s Hospital, Dublin, Ireland; 2Dermatology Department, Our Lady’s Children’s Hospital, Dublin, Ireland; 3Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom

Correspondence: Aideen Byrne - aideen.byrne@olchc.i.e.

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D47

Introduction

Early onset, severe atopic dermatitis (AD) is a recognised risk factor for food sensitisation and food allergy. However, not all infants with AD develop the same profile of food allergy. House Dust Mite (HDM) is known to stimulate both innate and adaptive responses promoting inflammation and barrier dysfunction. Early sensitisation to HDM is associated with development of asthma. We hypothesised that HDM sensitisation amplifies the development of food allergy in an already at risk population.

This aim of this study was to examine the effect of HDM sensitisation on food sensitisation profiles and the development of food allergy in infants with early onset AD.

Methods

This study was a retrospective, case controlled study with age matched controls. The patient cohort was identified through laboratory records at Our Lady’s Children’s Hospital Crumlin. All patients with sIgE testing to HDM performed between 2012 and 2016 were identified. However, only patients that had attended for treatment of AD were included in the study. Relevant clinical information was gathered from patients’ case notes.

Results

The study population comprised 140 infants with moderate to severe AD aged 4mth to 2 yr (13.8 months ± 5.8) of whom 59% were male and 41% were female. Onset of AD occurred before 3mth in 69% of infants and before 6mth in 93% of infants. No difference in either, time of onset of AD or severity, as measured by SCORAD, was identified between the HDM sensitised and HDM non sensitised populations. 78% of the total population were food sensitised. Sensitisation to peanut, wheat and soy was significantly higher in the HDM sensitised cohort. An association between sensitisation to 2 or more foods and HDM sensitisation was demonstrated (OR 2.28 p = 0.017). 56% of the total population had a history of an allergic reaction to food. Infants with HDM sensitisation were more likely to have food allergy (OR 3.11 P = 0.001). Furthermore, the number of clinically diagnosed food allergies/per child was also increased. A significantly greater number of HDM sensitised patients (39 versus 23) had a history consistent with an allergic reaction to egg (p = 0.006).

Conclusion

HDM sensitisation in infants with moderate to severe AD is independently associated with a risk of food sensitisation and food allergy. Early HDM sensitisation may be a useful biomarker of infants to prioritise for early introduction of food allergens in order to prevent development of food allergy.

D50

The serum vitamin D level in children with pneumonia

Anna Kosowska1*, Anna Prescha2, Daiva Gorczyca3

1Department of Clinical Immunology, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland; 2Department of Food Science and Dietetics, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland; 3Third Department and Clinic of Pediatrics, Immunology and Rheumatology of Developmental Age, Wroclaw, Poland

Correspondence: Anna Kosowska - annakusek@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D50

Introduction

Lower respiratory tract infections including mainly pneumonia are very important public health problem in children. The majority of evidence suggests that vitamin D plays a role in the body’s immunity and immunomodulation. The role of vitamin D in respiratory infections is unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the association between vitamin D level and lower respiratory tract infection in children.

Methods

We recruited100 patients with pneumonia and fifty healthy children aged between 2 months and 15 years. In 60 patients with pneumonia the diagnosis was radiologically confirmed. Complete blood count and C-reactive protein (CRP) level was measured in pneumonia group. Determination of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] level was performed using a competitive enzyme-linked immunoassay.

Results

We found no difference between the average level of serum 25(OH)D in pneumonia patients compared to control group (26.16 ± 15.67 ng/ml vs. 27.38 ± 10.90 ng/ml, p = 0.154). However there is a trend towards higher occurrence of vitamin D deficiency (serum level < 20 ng/ml) in patients with pneumonia (45% vs. 30%, p = 0.07). Children with vitamin D deficiency with pneumonia had significantly lower lymphocyte count compared with those without vitamin D deficiency (3.94 ± 2.06 vs. 5.61 ± 2.59 10^3/µl, p = 0.0008). We found no differences in total white blood count, platelet count, and CRP level.

Conclusion

The number of children with vitamin D deficiency was similar in pneumonia and control group. Due to the high occurrence of vitamin D deficiency, it is recommended that vitamin D level should be measured in children with pneumonia. Decrease of lymphocyte count in children with pneumonia can be associated with 25(OH)D inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation. The effects of vitamin D on infections and immunomodulation require further research.

D51

PD-L1+ regulatory B cells increase during milk oral immunotherapy

Bahar Torabi1*, Marieme Dembele1, Duncan Lejtenyi1, Moshe Ben-Shoshan1,2, Bruce D Mazer1,2

Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; 2 Division of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Montreal Children’s Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Correspondence: Bahar Torabi - bahar.torabi@mail.mcgill.ca

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D51

Introduction

Regulatory B cells (Bregs) have been implicated in venom immunotherapy and their role is being actively studied in non-IgE-mediated food allergies and autoimmune diseases [1–3]. No studies have examined the correlation between Bregs and IgE-mediated milk allergy, nor have the action of Bregs been examined in the treatment of food allergies with oral immunotherapy (OIT). Furthermore, there are currently no phenotypic, transcription factor, or lineage markers unique to regulatory B cells [4], making it a diverse and challenging focus of research. Programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) is one of the surface molecules described on Bregs [5]. PD-L1 is an inhibitory ligand expressed on antigen-presenting cells and tumour cells.

Methods

Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from plasma of milk-allergic children undergoing milk OIT, at baseline and at the end of escalation phase. The cells were cultured for 72 h in various conditions and stained for CD19, CD27, CD38, CD5, CD24, PD-L1, and intracellular IL-10. Conditions included CpG-B, a known stimulator of IL-10-producing B cells, anti-IgM/IgG to activate the B cell receptor, and anti-CD40, IL4, IL21 for plasma cell and memory B cell induction. Milk proteins (casein, α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin) were added to some conditions as specific antigens. Statistical analysis was done using the Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank test and a p-value less than 0.05 was considered significant.

Results

An interim analysis showed a significant increase in 6 patients in the CD19dimPD-L1+CD38+ population at the end of escalation phase in 3 conditions: CpG-B/anti-IgM/IgG/anti-CD40, anti-CD40/IL4/IL21, and anti-CD40/IL4/IL21 plus milk proteins. The median percentage difference between baseline and end of escalation phase was 8.35, 4.49, and 7.12% for the above conditions, respectively. The majority (89.16%, 95% CI 81.21–95.56%) of the CD19dimPD-L1+ population in all conditions were CD38+ cells.

Conclusion

PD-L+ regulatory B cells increase during milk OIT and may be part of the mechanism of successful desensitization in children. This population of Bregs could play a role in other allergic diseases as well. Further assessment with a larger sample size is underway.

References
  1. 1.

    van de Veen, W., Stanic, B., Yaman, G., Wawrzyniak, M., Sollner, S., Tec, S., Akdis, D.G., Ruckert, B., Akdis, C., Akdis, M. IgG4 production is confined to human IL-10-producing regulatory B cells that suppress antigen-specific immune responses. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2013;131:1204–12.

     
  2. 2.

    Duddy, M., Niino, M., Adatia, F., Hebert, S., Freedman, M., Atkins, H., Kim, HJ., and Bar-Or, A. Distinct effector cytokine profiles of memory and naive human B cell subsets and implication in multiple sclerosis. J Immunol 2007; 178(10):6092–9.

     
  3. 3.

    Noh, J., Noh, G., Kim, H.S., Kim, A.R., and Choi, W.S. Allergen-specific responses of CD19(+)CD5(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory B cells (Bregs) and CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cell (Tregs) in immune tolerance of cow milk allergy of late eczematous reactions. Cell Immunol 2012; 274:109–114.

     
  4. 4.

    Tedder, T.F. B10 cells: a functionally defined regulatory B cell subset. J Immunol 2015;194:1395–1401.

     
  5. 5.

    Khan AR, Hams E, Floudas A, Sparwasser T, Weaver CT, Fallon PG. PD-L1hi B cells are critical regulators of humoral immunity. Nat Commun. 2015;6:5997.

     

D53

The usefulness of molecular based allergy diagnostics in a secondary pediatric referral center

Anne Karina Kjær, Signe Dreier, Ole D. Wolthers*

Asthma and Allergy Clinic, Children's Clinic Randers, Randers, Denmark

Correspondence: Ole D. Wolthers - akk.odws@dadlnet.dk

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):D53

Introduction

Recent guidelines have suggested that molecular based allergy (MA) diagnostics may be used in the diagnostic work-up of selected cases of suspected peanut allergy, birch pollen allergy and associated cross-reactivity, insect allergy and in determining triggering allergens for specific immunotherapy. Guideline reports, however, have concluded that population-based studies involving evaluation of the usefulness of MA diagnostics are needed1. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of MA diagnostics in a secondary pediatric referral center.

Methods

961 consecutively referred children and adolescents aged 0.2–18.8 (mean 6.9) years, 439 girls (45.7%) and 522 boys (55.3%) were included from the prospective Asthma and Allergy in a Secondary Pediatric Referral Center Study (AASP 2002) in the present survey. At referral based on history and clinical signs a suspected diagnosis of an IgE mediated condition was made, and conventional work-up i.e. skin prick testing and assessment of specific IgE panels in the blood and oral provocation tests (when needed) were performed. If a specific diagnosis could not be reached from the investigations, suspected peanut allergy, birch pollen allergy and associated cross-reactivity, insect allergy and triggering allergens for specific immunotherapy were assessed by MA diagnostics.

Results

Based on conventional work-up a diagnosis was established in 946 patients (97.7%). MA diagnostics were performed in 15 individuals (2.3%), 7 girls and 8 boys aged 3.2–17.8 (mean 10.6) years. Five cases of suspected peanut allergy, 7 of suspected birch pollen allergy and associated cross-reactivity, and 1 case of insect allergy and grass pollen allergy, respectively, were investigated. In 8 cases a specific diagnosis was established based on MA diagnostics; in 7 cases MA diagnostics could not improve diagnosis.

Conclusion

Most patients in a secondary pediatric referral center with suspected IgE mediated allergy can be managed by conventional diagnostic methods. MA diagnostics may be useful in a small and selected subgroup only in whom they may not be helpful in all cases.

Reference

  1. 1.

    Canonica GW, Ansotegui IJ, Pawankar R, et al. A WAO—ARIA—GA2LEN consensus document on molecular-based allergy diagnostics. World Allergy Organ J. 2013 Oct 3;6(1):17. https://doi.org/10.1186/1939-4551-6-17.

     

P1

Princess Asma—An effective asthma education resource for the pediatric population

Louise Kuo1*, Rhonda Trotman1, Azmain Chowdhury1, Jonny Coppel1, Lucy Gibson2, Rahul Chodhari3

1University College London, London, United Kingdom; 2King’s College London, London, United Kingdom; 3The Royal Free London Foundation NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom

Correspondence: Louise Kuo - louise.kuo.13@ucl.ac.uk

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P1

Introduction

Asthma is a highly prevalent condition within the pediatric population estimated to affect 1 in 11 children in the UK [1]. Yet, despite the efficacy of asthma medication, asthma-related morbidity and mortality remain major issues with acute exacerbations a leading cause of Hospitalisation in developed countries [2] [3]. It has been predicted that 70% of emergency admissions are preventable [4] and largely attributable to poor patient education. This project aimed to enhance pediatric asthma awareness and understanding through the provision of an informative, interactive and enjoyable resource.

Methods

We designed an educational asthma booklet called ‘Princess Asma’ primarily targeted at girls aged 5–10. The efficacy of Princess Asma was determined by administering questionnaires before and immediately after reading the printed booklet. Questions assessed impact on asthma knowledge, testing on: signs and symptoms of an asthma attack; underlying airway changes; possible triggers of asthma attacks and appropriate inhaler and spacer use. Questions regarding perceived changes in understanding and the acceptability of Princess Asma were also included.

In addition, we designed an online questionnaire to record the responses of healthcare professionals to Princess Asma. This enabled us to assess the accuracy and scope of the information provided as well as the feasibility of using Princess Asma in a clinical environment.

Results

The responses of 16 children and 11 healthcare professionals, that included nurses and doctors, were assessed.

The pre-booklet and post-booklet mean test scores were 44.8 and 82.3% respectively; this was a significant increase (p < 0.05). The greatest improvements were seen in the proportion of children correctly answering questions related to reliever use, preventer use and underlying changes during an asthma attack. Of the children sampled, Princess Asma also improved perceived understanding of asthma (93.8%), was read with ease (87.5%) and was found enjoyable (87.5%).

Princess Asma was considered accurate, covered key asthma-related information and useful in clinic by all healthcare professionals sampled.

Conclusion

This pilot study suggests that Princess Asma is an enjoyable resource that successfully improves asthma understanding and confidence amongst the target pediatric population. Crucially it provides information related to asthma management that has the potential to reduce Hospitalisation rates amongst children. Healthcare professionals have shown they are both willing and able to foresee an application for Princess Asma in clinic. In future, we hope to distribute Princess Asma on a larger scale and study its potential longer-term benefits.

References
  1. 1.

    Asthma UK. Asthma facts and statistics [Internet]. [cited 20 April 2017] Available from: https://www.asthma.org.uk/about/media/facts-and-statistics/

     
  2. 2.

    Moorman JE, Akinbami LJ, Bailey CM, Zahran HS, King ME, Johnson C a, et al. National surveillance of asthma: United States, 2001–2010. [Internet]. 2012.1–67 p. [cited 22 April 2017] Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24252609

     
  3. 3.

    Asher MI, Montefort S, Björkstén B, et al.; ISAAC Phase Three Study Group. Worldwide time trends in the prevalence of symptoms of asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, and eczema in childhood: ISAAC Phases One and Three repeat multicountry cross-sectional surveys. Lancet. 2006; 368(9537):733–743. Erratum in Lancet. 2007;370(9593):1128.

     
  4. 4.

    DoH. An Outcomes Strategy for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and Asthma in England [Internet]. 2011;1–56 [cited 23 April 2017] Available from: http://www.dh.gov.uk/prod_consum_dh/groups/dh_digitalassets/documents/digitalasset/dh_128428.pdf

     

P3

Dynamic spirometry in preschool children

Emma Caffrey Osvald1*, Katarina Stenberg Hammar2, Cilla Söderhäll2,3, Gunilla Hedlin2,4, Jon Konradsen2,4

1Astrid Lindgren Children’s Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; 2Department for Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; 3Department for Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; 4Centre for Allergy Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden

Correspondence: Emma Caffrey Osvald - emma.caffreyosvald@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P3

Introduction

There are limited data concerning the relationship between preschool lung function and the occurrence of wheeze, in part because dynamic spirometry is technically and clinically difficult to achieve in this age group.

Within this prospective study on children with acute wheeze, we wanted to investigate the feasibility of undertaking dynamic spirometry in preschool children. Further, we wanted to investigate whether there was any association between preschool lung function (FEV1%, FEV1/FVC%) and episodes of wheeze or use of asthma medication.

Methods

Included in the study are 156 children aged 6 months to 4 years who attended the emergency department of a pediatric university Hospital with acute wheeze. The children were followed prospectively and dynamic spirometry was performed using Medikro spirometry software v3.0.2. Reference values for preschool children are published by Quanjer1. Data concerning episodes of wheeze, prevalence of atopy and use of asthma medication were ascertained by physician administered questionnaire. Spirometry data showed a normal distribution and student’s t-test was used for analysis.

Results

Of the 105 children followed up, 52 children performed spirometry. They were between 4.4 and 5.8 years (median 5 years, IQR 6 months). 28 (54%) children reported at least one episode of wheeze in the previous year and 28 (54%) children had regularly used short-acting bronchodilators.12 (23%) children were prescribed inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and 16 (31%) children were prescribed a leukotriene receptor antagonist (LRA). There was no statistical difference in FEV1% between girls and boys (p = 0.2), however boys with parental atopy had a trend towards a reduced FEV1% compared to the rest of the group [82 (52–101) vs. 89 (57–118), p = 0.06]. Our data did not show any significant association between FEV1% or FEV1/FVC% and the number of wheezing episodes or the use of asthma medication. See Table 1.
Table 1

.

Variable

FEV1%

FVC%

FEV1%/FVC%

Gender

 Girls (n = 21)

89 (57–118)

77 (46–109)

112 (90–118)

 Boys (n = 31)

84 (52–116)

74 (41–97)

107 (69–117)

Wheeze

 Yes (n = 28)

84 (52–105)

77 (54–109)

107 (69–117)

 No (n = 24)

87 (86–118)

73 (41–97)

111 (90–118)

Parental atopy

 Yes (n = 17)

84 (57–118)

73 (41–97)

108 (69–118)

 No (n = 35)

88 (52–116)

80 (57–109)

109 (90–119)

Bronchodilator use

 Yes (n = 28)

88 (64–118)

76 (51–109)

106 (69–119)

 No (n = 24)

83 (52–116)

74 (41–97)

111 (85–118)

ICS

 Yes (n = 12)

86 (52–118)

74 (52–97)

109 (69–119)

 No (n = 40)

88 (83–105)

77 (62–109)

118 (90–118)

LRA use

 Yes (n = 16)

91 (78–116)

76 (62–94)

109 (85–118)

 No (n = 36)

84 (52–118)

75 (41–109)

109 (69–118)

Conclusion

Our study shows that it is possible to perform dynamic spirometry in children from 4 years of age. No association was found between lung function measurements and current clinical symptoms. However, the study indicates that boys with parental atopy may be at risk of reduced lung function. Hence, the results obtained may be useful to indicate which children will develop persistent asthma. In a recent study on preschool children with asthma, a closer relationship between pulmonary function and clinical characteristics was found using FEV0.75 (L)2, suggesting that FEV0.75(L) is a more appropriate marker of airway obstruction in this age group.

References
  1. 1.

    Quanjer PH, Stanojevic S, Cole TJ et al. Multi-ethnic reference values for spirometry for the3–95-yr age range. ERS 2012 Dec 1;40(6):1324–43.

     
  2. 2.

    Busi LE, Restuccia S, Tourres R, et al. Assessing bronchodilator response in preschool children using spirometry. Thorax 2017;72:367–372.

     

P5

Hypomagnesiemia and pediatric asthma control

Ivan Shishimorov*, Vladimir Petrov, Olga Magnitskaya, Igor Nefedov, Alex Perminov

Volgograd State Medical University, Volgograd, Russia

Correspondence: Ivan Shishimorov - drshishimorov@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P5

Introduction

Hypomagnesiemia is a possible factor which maintain uncontrolled bronchial asthma. Aim and objectives: Hypomagnesiemia prevalence and relationship with children bronchial asthma control were studied.

Methods

There were studied 211 bronchial asthma children (137 boys and 74 girls, average age − 11.63 ± 4.34 y.o.; uncontrolled/partial controlled/controlled bronchial asthma were as 94/56/61). Main assessment parameters were ACQ-5 test, FeNO, spirometry, eosinophil blood count, total IgE, Mg erythrocyte [Mg2 +]e and plasma [Mg2 +]p levels. The associations between [Mg2 +]e or [Mg2 +]p and another assessment parameters were analyzed with Spearman correlation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated for separate assessment parameters and asthma control. Associations with asthma control were determined within each combinations of particular parameters using eight separate logistic regression models.

Results

Hypomagnesiemia were determined only for [Mg2 +]e (average level was 1.8 ± 0.37 mmol/L). Average plasma Mg level was [Mg2 +]p at normal range (0.95 ± 0.14 mmol/L).There were revealed significant correlations between [Mg2 +]e and age (r = − 0.2, p = 0.004), daytime symptoms (r = − 0.24, p = 0.0004), any activity limitation due to asthma (r = − 0.26, p = 0.0001), SABA usage (r = − 0.26, p = 0.0001), FeNO (r = − 0.21, p = 0.0036), eosinophil blood count (r = − 0.34, p = 0.0001).ROC analysis AUC for [Mg2 +]e was 0.74 ± 0.039. Optimal [Mg2 +]e level was 1.64 mmol/L (J-index 0.48, Se = 88.9 and Sp = 59.5%). Associations with asthma control were determined for logistic regression model “FeNO (≤ 20 ppb) + [Mg2 +]e (> 1.64 mmol/L)”.

Conclusion

Magnesium erythrocyte level is important asthma control predictor.

P7

Eosinophil derived neurotoxin, a promising biomarker for diagnosis of asthma

Tina Ekenkrantz1*, Mizuho Nagao2, Magnus Borres1, Takao Fujisawa2, Anders Sjölander1

1Thermo Fisher Scientific, Uppsala, Sweden; 2Allergy Center, Mie National Hospital, Tsu, Japan

Correspondence: Tina Ekenkrantz - tina.ekenkrantz@thermofisher.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P7

Introduction

Eosinophil Derived Neurotoxin (EDN), an eosinophil granule protein released during eosionophil activation, has been linked to the pathophysiology of asthma and may serve as a biomarker for diagnosis of asthma. We compared a recently developed EDN research assay with established methods for asthma diagnosis (Eosinophil Cationic Protein (ECP), exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and blood eosinophil fraction (EOS%)) to demonstrate the diagnostic value of EDN in childhood asthma.

Methods

Asthmatic (n = 37) and healthy (n = 86) children aged 6–18 years were analyzed for serum EDN, serum ECP, FeNO and EOS%. We used a novel research assay based on the ImmunoCAP platform to analyze serum EDN concentrations. ECP, FeNO and EOS% were analyzed according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

Results

The median concentrations for all four biomarkers were significantly higher in the asthma group compared to healthy controls (P < 0.0001) (EDN 74.1 µg/l (range 19.0–247.9) vs. 28.1 µg/l (range 6.5–230.5); ECP 40.6 µg/l (range 6.4–194.8) vs. 15.6 µg/l (range 10.6–114.4); EOS% 7.3% (range 1.2–20.0) vs. 2.9% (range 0.8–14.0); FeNO 32.5 ppb (range 5.0–181.0) vs. 14.0 ppb (range 0.0–106.0)).

The sensitivity and specificity for EDN was 70 and 76%, respectively, (cut-off 47 µg/l), 70 and 81% for ECP (cut-off 29 µg/l), 69 and 68% for FeNO (cut-off 19.5 ppb) and 76 and 72% for EOS% (cut-off 4.25%). The EDN concentration correlated with the ECP concentration (r = 0.80), EOS% (r = 0.77) and FeNO concentration (r = 0.47).

Conclusion

We have shown that EDN has the potential to distinguish between asthmatic and healthy children. EDN correlates with both ECP and EOS% but weaker with FeNO. Combining EDN measurement with one or several of the other biomarkers could have an additive value in the diagnosis of asthmatic children.

P8

Self-efficacy, asthma control and quality of life in adolescents with asthma taking part in an intervention study

Simone Holley1*, Rebecca Knibb2, Sue Latter3, Christina Liossi4, Frances Mitchell5, Cilla Snape, Graham Roberts1,5,7

1Clinical and Experimental Sciences and Human Development in Health Academic Units, University of Southampton, United Kingdom; 2 Aston University, Birmingham, United Kingdom and Faculty of Medicine, Southampton, United Kingdom; 3 Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southampton, United Kingdom; 4School of Psychology, University of Southampton, United Kingdom and Department of Pediatric Psychology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom; 5 The David Hide Asthma and Allergy Research Centre, St Mary’s Hospital, Isle of Wight, United Kingdom; 6NIHR/Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Facility, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, United Kingdom; 7NIHR Southampton Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, United Kingdom

Correspondence: Simone Holley - s.l.holley@soton.ac.uk

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P8

Introduction

Many adolescents with asthma have poor disease control despite the availability of effective therapies. Research has identified that self-efficacy is an important component of chronic disease self-management and may also be important for quality of life [1]. Adult studies have shown that higher self-efficacy is associated with improved asthma control and better quality of life [2]. We aimed to investigate the relationship between asthma control, self-efficacy, and quality of life adolescents with asthma.

Method

We recruited adolescents aged 12–18 years to take part in a randomised controlled trial of a new adolescent intervention aimed at improving asthma self-management. A prescription of at least one preventer medication and an Asthma Control Test (ACT) score of < 21 was a criteria for being included in the study. Self-efficacy to manage asthma was measured using a newly developed instrument—the Adolescent Asthma Self Efficacy Questionnaire [3] quality of life was measured using the Pediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire ([4]. Questionnaires were completed during the baseline visit in clinic.

Results

A total of 71 participants were recruited (AASEQ = 54; PAQoL = 28). We conducted a series of partial correlation co-efficients adjusting for gender as there were significant differences between boys and girls on the ACT and a number of sub-scales. As shown in Table 1, asthma control was not significantly associated with total self-efficacy, although it was in the expected direction (r = 0.24, p = 0.07). Better asthma control was associated with the beliefs subscale of the AASEQ. Better self-efficacy and improved asthma control were both significantly associated with improved quality of life.
Table 1

Partial correlations between asthma control, self-efficacy, and quality of life

 

Asthma control

QoL symptoms

QoL activity

QoL emotion

QoL total

Asthma control

 

0.450*

0.375*

0.494*

0.480*

SEQ medication

− .020

− .132

0.027

− .085

− .078

SEQ symptom

0.010

0.064

0.067

0.258

0.208

SEQ beliefs

0.442*

0.603*

0.581*

0.657

0.662

SEQ friends, family, school

0.134

− .008

0.240

0.232

0.140

SEQ total

0.242**

0.285

0.426*

0.442*

0.398*

*p < 0.05; **p = 0.072

Conclusion: Our results suggest that the SEQ and PAQoL measure different constructs and that there is a complex relationship between self-efficacy, quality of life and asthma control. Better self-efficacy may be associated with having better asthma control and quality of life. Alternatively, having better asthma control may underlie better self-efficacy and better quality of life. Future longitudinal studies should assess the direction of causality between these three constructs to identify the ideal target for interventions to improve the life experience of adolescents with asthma.

References:
  1. 1.

    Cramm, J. M., Strating, M. M., Roebroeck, M. E., and Nieboer, A. P. (2013). The importance of general self-efficacy for the quality of life of adolescents with chronic conditions. Social indicators research, 113(1), 551–561.

     
  2. 2.

    Lavoie, K. L., Bouchard, A., Joseph, M., Campbell, T. S., Favreau, H., and Bacon, S. L. (2008). Association of asthma self-efficacy to asthma control and quality of life. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 36(1), 100–106.

     
  3. 3.

    Holley, S., Knibb, R., Latter, S., Liossi, C., Mitchell, F., Snape, C., and Roberts, G. (submitted). Development and validation of the Adolescent Asthma Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (AASEQ)

     
  4. 4.

    Juniper, E.F., Guyatt, G.H., Feeny, D.H., Ferrie, P., Griffith, L.E. and Townsend, M. (1996) Measuring quality of life in children with asthma. Quality of life research, 5 (1), 35–46.

     

P9

Asthma exacerbation attendances in a pediatric emergency department

Sara Rolim*, Cláudia Teles Silva, Diana Bordalo, Joana Figueirinha, Fernanda Carvalho

Serviço de Pediatria, Centro Hospitalar do Médio Ave, Vila Nova de Famalicão, Portugal

Correspondence: Sara Rolim - slsrolim@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P9

Introduction

Asthma is the most common chronic disease in pediatric patients. Asthma exacerbations are a frequent reason for emergency department (ED) admissions. The aim of this study is to characterize emergency attendances for asthma exacerbations in a level 2 Hospital setting during the year of 2015.

Methods

Retrospective analysis of ED clinical records of children above 3 years of age and adolescents discharged with a diagnosis of “asthma” or “asthma exacerbation” during the year of 2015. The variables analyzed were: epidemiological characteristics, assessment according to the Manchester Triage System (MTS), previous medication and follow-up, treatment in an emergency setting and orientation and therapeutics at discharge.

Results

During 2015 there were 292 attendances for asthma exacerbation (8 per 1000 admissions). The median age was 9 years old and 69.5% were male. According to the MTS, 148 (50.7%) patients were classified as yellow, 70 (24%) as orange and 2 (0.7%) as red. Fourty one percent of patients had previous follow-up by a Pediatrician. Most patients were previously medicated with a short-acting bronchodilator (32.9%); 3.5% had an association long-acting bronchodilator/inhaled corticoid; 25% were medicated with an antileukotriene and 27.7% had no previous medication. Those who were treated with inhalation device none brought him to the ED. Hypoxemia exist in 71 (24.3%) patients and 19 of these were Hospitalized. In the ED, 82.2% received nebulized salbutamol, 15.7% nebulized salbutamol + ipatropium bromide and 50% a systemic corticoid (SC). A short course of SC was prescribed at the moment of discharge in 46.6% of patients and in 11% chronic medication was stepped up. Ninety percent were sent to their General Practitioner or Pediatrician, 2.7% to Outpatient Department and 7.5% were Hospitalized. There were 37 (15.5%) readmissions with a mean of 1.22 attendances per patient.

Conclusion

In this study there was a large number of ED attendances due to asthma exacerbations during 2015. However, only 10% were sent to Outpatient Department at the moment of discharge or needed Hospitalization. We verified that none of those who had an inhalation device brought him to the emergency room. So ED patients should be considered an important target for asthma education.

P10

Multiple atopic sensitization and health care utilization in a cohort of immigrant children from a cross-sectional study of respiratory health and atopy in relation to poor-quality housing in Malmö, Sweden

Jens C. Richter*

Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden

Correspondence: Jens C. Richter - jens.richter@med.lu.se

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P10

Introduction

Exposure to allergens plays a role in the development of atopic sensitization and influences allergic phenotype. The effects of exposure to relevant allergens both from the indoor and outdoor environment are complex. Immigrant children and their families are exposed to new spectra of seasonal and perennial allergens, and often new lifestyle factors, such as diet, and living conditions. Furthermore health literacy and accessibility of healthcare systems will play a role in what impact atopic diseases will have on these populations.

Methods

As part of a larger study into the health in its social context of an immigrant population living in poor-quality housing in Malmö/Sweden, families with small children were identified from health care records (child treated in primary care with respiratory illness), and school records (matched for age range). Families were visited in their homes by health communicators fluent in their language. Family and individual level health data, including skin-prick-tests (SPT) for a standard panel of aeroallergens, were analyzed together with environmental exposures (mould, dampness, ETS, crowding and -in the part of the study presented here: health care utilization over 7 years at the primary care level (data linkage to relevant registries)

Results

130 families participated, with usable data for 359 children under the age of 13, and 230 parents. The overall exposure to potentially harmful factors was relatively high, the burden of atopy and respiratory diseases was significant. 232 children under the age of 13 had SPTs performed, 48 of which were positive, of these 11 showed sensitization against 2 or more allergens. The spectrum of sensitizations was comparable to a Swedish population (seasonal plant pollen; animal dander, moulds, and house dust mites (HDM). Utilization of primary health care resources amongst the polysensitized children was overall comparable to that of a gender- and age-matched non-polysensitized control group (n = 20) from the same cohort. Higher health care usage was seen in both groups only in children with a documented diagnosis of asthma.

Conclusion

In our cohort, it was rather the presence of an asthma diagnosis than polysensitization that drovehigher utilization of primary health care resources, confirming that atopic sensitization in itself is not a disease state, but rather a marker of potential for atopic disease.

P12

Prenatal maternal stress and pediatric asthma: a systematic review

Ummulkhulsum Y. Ibrahim*

School of Medicine, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom

Correspondence: Ummulkhulsum Y. Ibrahim - ummul_ashraf96@ymail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P12

Introduction

The prevalence and incidence of asthma are on the rise with children mainly affected [1]. One factor that has been linked to the development of asthma in children is prenatal maternal stress (PNMS) [2]. Various studies have been carried out to determine if there is an association between PNMS and childhood asthma. In this systematic literature review, such studies were critically reviewed to establish the actual association. Establishing the actual association could potentiate the development of interventions to help reduce the incidence and hence prevalence of asthma.

Method

This literature review was done according to the PRISMA guideline [3]. Databases such as PubMed, PsychINFO, SCOPUS, EMBASE, MEDLINE and Cochrane Library were searched. Keywords used in the search include: “stress”, “pregnancy”, “child*” and “asthma”.

Results

A total of 173 publications were found of which 10 met the eligibility criteria for the review. The eligible studies used different stressors such as bereavement, adverse life events, natural disaster and job strain. The definition of asthma also varied across the studies. 6 studies recorded an overall positive association between PNMS and childhood asthma. 2 studies recorded a gender-specific positive association and 2 other studies recorded an age-specific positive association.

Conclusion

There is a potential positive association between PNMS and childhood asthma. However, the studies have various limitations which need to be addressed by future studies in order to establish the actual association and its pattern.

References
  1. 1.

    Wright, R. J. Prenatal maternal stress and early caregiving experiences: Implications for childhood asthma risk. Pediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology. 2007 Oct 11; 21(3):8–14.

     
  2. 2.

    Khashan, A. S., Wicks, S., Dalman, C., Henriksen, T. B., Li, J., Mortensen, P. B., Kenny, L. Prenatal stress and risk of asthma Hospitalisation in offspring: A Swedish population-based Study. Psychosomatic Medicine. 2012 Jun 28;74(6):635–641.

     
  3. 3.

    Moher, D., Liberati, A., Tetzlaff, J., Altman, D. G., andThe PRISMA Group. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses: The PRISMA Statement. PLOS Medicine. 2009 Jul 29; 6(7):1–6.

     

P17

Inflammatory markers of atopic asthma in children

Doina Plesca1, Ana-Maria Moiceanu Sovarel2*, Eugenia Buzoianu1, Lavinia Butum3, Varvara Toma1, Oana Varban1, Vlad Plesca4, Mariana Moiceanu1, Daniela Popeia1, Victoria Hurduc2

1Dr. Victor Gomoiu Children Hospital, University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Carol Davila, Bucharest, Romania; 2 Emergency Hospital Elias- Allergology Department, Bucharest, Romania; 3Vitan Polyclinic, Bucharest, Romania; 4Dr. D. Hociota, O.r.l. Hospital, Bucharest, Romania

Correspondence: Ana-Maria Moiceanu Sovarel - anamaria.moiceanu88@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P17

Introduction

Atopic children with asthma and aeroallergen sensitization have often increased blood eosinophils (B-Eos) and elevated fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO). Both of them are markers of systemic, respectively local eosinophilic inflammation. Eosinophil cationic protein (S-ECP) is another marker of systemic eosinophilic inflammation that might be used in atopic children with asthma.

The aim is to assess the correlation between FeNO values, respectively B-Eos count, and serum eosinophil cationic protein (S-ECP) level in atopic asthmatic children with aeroallergens sensitization.

Method

A prospective study was conducted in “Victor Gomoiu” Clinical Children’s Hospital from May 2016 until May 2017. This study included 46 children aged between 5 and 18 years diagnosed with atopic asthma and aeroallergens sensitization.

In each patient FeNO was measured using chemiluminescence analyzer (NIOX MINO). B-Eos were determined using the complete blood count and S-ECP was measured in each patient serum using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

The normal FeNO value varied according to age. Thus the value is considered normal < 20 ppb in children aged 5–12 years old and in children aged 12–18 years old < 25 ppb; a normal B-Eos count is < 400 cells/mmc; a normal S-ECP is < 13.3 mcg/l.

Finally the correlation between S-ECP and FeNO, respectively S-ECP and B-Eos, were assessed using Pearson Chi Square test.

Results

16 patients had normal S-ECP; out of these 12 had normal of FeNOvalue and 4 had increased FeNO value; 11 had normal B-Eos count and 5 had increased B-Eos count.

30 patients had elevated S-ECP; out of these 12 had normal FeNO value and 18 had increased FeNO value; 9 were with normal B-Eos value and 21 with increased B-Eos value.

Using Pearson Chi Square test to evaluate the correlation between FeNO value and S-ECP in atopic children with asthma and aeroallergens sensitization we have obtained a p value0.0236 (< 0.05, statistically significant).

Using Pearson Chi Square test to evaluate the correlation between B-Eos count and S-ECP in atopic children with asthma and aeroallergens sensitization we have obtained a p value 0.0116 (< 0.05, statistically significant).

Conclusion

In atopic children with asthma and aeroallergens sensitization S-PCE value (marker of activated eosinophils) is correlated with other markers of local and systemic eosinophilic inflammation (FeNO and B-EOS).

P18

Parents perspective on exercise for asthma-diagnosed children

Seda Sirin Kose, Gizem Atakul*, Suna Asilsoy, Nevin Uzuner, Ozkan Karaman

Department of Pediatric Immunology and Allergy, Dokuz Eylul University, Faculty of Medicine, Izmir, Turkey

Correspondence: Gizem Atakul - drgizematakul@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P18

Introduction

Asthma is the most common chronic illness in childhood. Attacks can be triggered by exercise; when the activity is improper or asthma is uncontrolled. Families often think that they can prevent attacks by limiting their children’s activities.

The aim of this study is to determine the how the parents of asthmatic children think about exercise and whether they need education on asthma and exercise.

Methods

A questionnaire was given to parents of 5–17 year-old children with asthma to evaluate their parents’ knowledge on asthma and exercise. Sociocultural level of the family and exercise perspectives of the parents of asthmatic children were asked in this questionnaire.

Results

Questionnaires filled by parents of 183 children with mean age of 9.5 ± 3.3 years were evaluated.

49% of the families had a monthly income of 2000 TRY or above.

32% of the participants had family history of asthma.

48% of the parents were smoking, 62% of the parents with high education level were non-smokers while this rate was 46% at lower education levels.

42% of parents stated that exercise did not worsen the children’s asthma symptoms, 88% thought exercise was necessary. 38% children performed regular exercise. 68% parents did not know what their children needed to do before exercise, 61% wanted to be educated about what to do before the exercise.

42% fathers did not want to receive education, while the education level of the fathers increased, the desire to receive education increased (p > 0.05).

38% mothers did not want to receive education, no statistical relation was found between mother’s education level.

As the monthly income ratio of the family increased, the number of cases that regularly exercised increased also.

Parents of regularly exercising children were more likely to exercise than those who did not exercise regularly (p < 0.05).

Conclusion

These results support the fact that parents of children monitored in a university Hospital are not informed about exercise. Parents should be informed about physical activity and importance of exercise in asthma. Families should be informed and encouraged about exercise in childhood asthma.

P21

When asthma comes with chronic diarrhea

Guergana Petrova1*, Polina Shahid2, Snezhina Lazova1, Penka Perenovska1, Dimitrinka Miteva1, Vera Papochieva1, Nadejda Yaneva3, Stamatios Priftis4, Alexey Savov3

1Medical University, Sofia, Pediatric Clinic, University Hospital “Alexandrovska”, Sofia, Bulgaria; 2Medical University, Sofia, Clinic of Clinical Allergy and Asthma, Univesrity Hospital “Alenadrovska”, Sofia, Bulgaria; 3National Genetic Laboratory (NGL), Sofia, Bulgaria; Medical University, Sofia, Bulgaria; 4Faculty of Public Health, Medical University, Sofia, Bulgaria

Correspondence: Guergana Petrova - gal_ps@yahoo.co.uk

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P21

Introduction

Chronic bronchial obstruction and chronic diarrhea can be signs of one disease or could be two separate disease entities in one patient.

Case report

We present two cases of patients presenting with chronic cough (due to bronchial obstruction) and chronic diarrhea.

The first case is a 6 year old boy referred to the clinic with suspicion for cystic fibrosis. The sweat test was negative, genetic analysis revealed only one CFTR mutation with variable significance; bronchodilator response was positive, as well as the Tissue transglutaminase antibody. We concluded the patient have asthma and celiac disease and indicated respective therapy with good effect.

The second case is a male, with history of protracted pneumonia as infant, followed by 10 years of “good health”. At the age of 13 the patient started treatment for asthma with inhaled corticosteroids and pancreatic enzymes due to his “exocrine pancreatic insufficiency”. Due to progressive loss of his lung function he was referred to the clinic at the age of 30 years. The sweat test was positive and we found two disease-causing CFTR mutations. The therapy was modified according ECFS guidelines.

Conclusion

Despite knowing the basic disease in a patient, every new symptom should be evaluated in both directions—as a presentation of the underlying disease and as a presentation of a new disease. Without proper investigations we could not precise the diagnosis, which could lead to devastating results (physical and psychological) for the patients.

Consent to publish

The authors have obtained parental informed consent of the patient mentioned in the article.

P25

The correlation between the basal plethysmography ratio RV/TLC with the decrease of FEV1 post effort after free running test, in allergic children with normal basal spirometry

Anxhela Gurakuqi Qirko1, Alkerta Ibranji3*, Sonila Borici2, Mira Xhixha4, Esmeralda Shehu5, Mirela Hasanaj6, Ervin Mingomataj7

1Allergist MD, PhD, Lecturer at Faculty of Medicine, Tirana, Albania; 2Allergist MD, Department of Pediatrics, UHC “Mother Theresa”, Tirana, Albania; 3Allergist MD, “At Luigji Monti”, “Our Lady of Good Counsel University”, Tirana, Albania; 4Allergist, MD, Polyclinic Nr.1, Tirana, Albania; 5Allergist MD, Durres’s Hospital, Durres, Albania; 6Allergist MD, Polyclinic Nr.9, Tirana, Albania; 7Allergist MD, Department of Allergology, UHC “Mother Theresa”, Tirana, Albania

Correspondence: Alkerta Ibranji - alkertaibranji@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P25

Introduction

Very often there is a normal spirometry despite a clinical background of symptoms related to Exercise Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB), mostly in children (1). Free running test provides more evidences for EIB and Bronchial Hyper Reactivity (BHR), especially in an allergic child. On the ground of a normal basal spirometry, if we do suspect a BHR according to clinical signs, we can perform also the plethysmography. Quite often it’s found an increase of RV and RV/TLC (as % of predicted), reflecting a dynamic “air trapping”. BHR by itself has “air trapping” in distal airways (3). The increase of RV/TLC could be very orientating to presume any BHR, even before any effort bronchial provocation test. Such comparison of RV/TLC with BHR is made with other bronchial provocations, like methacholine, in other studies (2).

Significant correlation between baseline RV/TLC % (cut off > 125% of RV/TLC predicted) (2) with decrease of FEV1 from baseline after 6 min free running test (cut off > 10% decrease FEV1post effort from baseline FEV1) (4). FEV1 is chosen because it has better repeatability and it’s more discriminative than PEF rate (6).

Methods

Prospective study, 37 children (5–17 years old, 21 girls and 16 boys), with allergy positive prick test (at least 1 aeroallergen), normal X-ray, no evidence of any infection last month. The majority had the first Lung Function measurement ever. The basal spirometry and plethysmography are performed, followed by a 6 min free running test, only when basal FEV1 > 80%. No nose clip during the run (for maximal cooperation) (5), with median maximal heartbeat 170/min, performed in the same hour interval (16–18 P.M), same conditions of temperature (7) and air humidity (April–May 2016). Spirometry and plethysmography are repeated during the first 5 min after the running test.

Results

Except 3 children with pre-effort FEV1 < 80%, which were not allowed to make the running test, the results of 34 children participating, are presented below:

Correlation of basal RV/TLC % predict with FEV1 post effort (% basal FEV1) results statistically significant (p < 0.001).

Variable

Pearson’s Correlation with basal RV/TLC% predict (95% confidence interval)

p value

FEV1 post effort (% FEV1 basal)

− 0.637 (− 0.901 to − 0.354)

0.001

Conclusion

The increase of RV/TLC > 125% of predicted value in baseline plethysmography is very suggestive of dynamic “air trapping” in atopic children with normal basal spirometry, with a significant correlation with BHR after effort.

P26

Thymic stromal lymphopoietin, IL-33 and periostin in infants with recurrent wheezing after severe bronchiolitis

Maria Luz Garcia-Garcia1*, Sergio Quevedo1, Cristina Calvo1, Ana Moreira1, Beatriz Sastre2, Ana Tellez1, Laura Remedios1, Nadia Alvarez1, Araceli Marques1, Nadia Alvarez1, Patricia Alonso1, Sara Bellon1, Francisco Pozo3, Inmaculada Casas3, Victoria Del Pozo2

1Pediatrics Department, Severo Ochoa Universitary Hospital, Madrid, Spain; 2Immunology Department. IIS-Fundación Jiménez Diaz, Madrid, Spain; 34respiratory Virus and Influenza Unit. National Microbiology Center (Isciii)., Madrid, Spain

Correspondence: Maria Luz Garcia-Garcia - marialuz.hso@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P26

Introduction

Much attention has recently been focused on thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP)(1), IL-33(2) and periostin (3) in allergic diseases, but less is known about their role in viral bronchiolitis and the subsequent development of recurrent wheezing and asthma.

Our first aim was to characterize the response of TSLP, periostin, IL-10, IL-33 and IFN-γ in the nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) of infants with severe bronchiolitis. Additionally, we aimed to determine if detection of these proteins in infants hospitalized with bronchiolitis was associated with the severity of the episode and with the development of recurrent wheezing in the 2 years following the acute episode.

Methods

A follow-up study of 159 infants hospitalized for bronchiolitis, and a control group of 42 healthy-infants, was conducted from March/2014 to December/2015 at Severo Ochoa University Hospital (Madrid. Spain). Epidemiological and clinical data were collected through a structured questionnaire. Viral detection was performed by multiple polymerase chain reaction in NPA. We analyzed in nasal secretions, IFN-?, IL-10, TSLP, IL-33 and periostin. Patients were followed-up for 2 years after acute bronchiolitis. Data on wheezing episodes and maintenance treatment were collected through a structured questionnaire. The study was approved by the hospital Ethics Committee and informed consent from parents was obtained.

Results

At least one virus was detected in 159(87.3%) hospitalized infants. The most frequent were respiratory syncytial virus (RSV):149(70%) and rhinovirus (RV): 42(19.7%). Infants with bronchiolitis had higher levels of TSLP (P = 0.02), IL-33(P < 0.001) and periostin (P = 0.003) than healthy controls. Detectable levels of TSLP and periostin were more frequent in virus-positive than in virus-negative patients (P = 0.05). TSLP and IL-33 were also more common in coinfections, mainly RSV and HRV, than in single-infections (P < 0.05). No patient with bronchiolitis but with negative viral detection had detectable levels of nasal TSLP or IL-33. Infants with hospital stay ≥ 5 days were more likely to have detectable levels of nasal TSLP and periostin after adjusting by age (P = 0.01). Oral corticosteroid for wheezing was more frequently prescribed in the first year of follow-up in infants with positive TSLP (50% vs. 19.4%, p = 0.007). Also, children who required oral corticosteroids during the second year had a higher level of TSLP (69.2 pg/ml vs. 42.4 pg/ml, p = 0.007) and a lower level of IFN-γ (8.6 pg/ml vs. 27.2 pg/ml, p = 0.008) during the acute episode.

Conclusion

Severe bronchiolitis is associated with elevated nasal levels of TSLP, IL-33 and periostin. Children who developed recurrent wheezing and need for oral corticosteroids at 2 years of follow-up had significantly higher nasal TSLP and lower IFN-? values.

Acknowledgements

This study has been partially supported by FIS (Fondo de Investigaciones Sanitarias—Spanish Health Research Fund) Grants PI12/0129 and FEDER (Fondo Europeo de Desarrollo Regional); Alfonso X El Sabio, University Grant: VI Convocatoria Santander-UAX; CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES), a Carlos III Institute of Health Initiative.

References
  1. 1.

    Chauhan A, Singh M, Agarwal A, Paul N.Correlation of TSLP, IL-33, and CD4 + CD25 + FOXP3 + T regulatory (Treg) in pediatric asthma. J Asthma. 2015;52:868–72.

     
  2. 2.

    Wang Y, Wang L, Hua S. Interleukin-33 in children with asthma: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Allergol Immunopathol (Madr). 2017;45:387–392.

     
  3. 3.

    Li W, Gao P, Zhi Y, et al. Periostin: its role in asthma and its potential as a diagnostic or therapeutic target. Respir Res. 2015;16:57.

     

P28

Vitamin D levels and peak expiratory flow rate correlation in childhood asthma

Keya Rani Lahiri*, Vasundhara Chugh, Chinmay Chaudhari, Sadaf Siddiqui

D Y Patil School of Medicine, Navi Mumbai, India

Correspondence: Keya Rani Lahiri - drkeyalahiri@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P28

Introduction

Vitamin D is vital for lung development and maturation. It acts on vitamin D receptor in airway smooth muscle, enhancing steroid responsiveness. We studied 25(OH) vitamin D levels in asthmatic children. We correlated the levels with severity of asthma and Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) pre and post vitamin D therapy and conventional inhalation therapy.

Methods

It was a prospective, randomised, comparative study including 60 patients. Institutional ethics committee approval was taken. Informed consent and assent was taken. We studied 30 patients each in the study and control groups. History and clinical examination were recorded in a pre-designed proforma. Both groups received conventional inhalational therapy. The study group received vitamin D supplementation (60,000 IU orally, weekly for 10 weeks). PEFR was measured in the control group and pre and post vitamin D therapy in study group. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi square test and Mann–Whitney test.

Results

Age ranged between 6 and 12 years with the mean of the study and control groups being 9.31 ± 1.86 and 9.13 ± 2.12 years respectively. The study comprised of 39 males (65%) and 21 females (35%). Intermittent asthma revealed 8 (13.3%) patients each; Mild persistent asthma had 15 (25%) and 17 (28.4%) patients each; Moderate persistent asthma had 7 (11.6%) and 5 (8.4%) patients each in study and control group. 25(OH) vitamin D levels were deficient in 46 (76.7%) and insufficient in 14 (23.3%) patients. In intermittent asthma patients, 12 were vitamin D deficient and 4 were insufficient; mild persistent asthma, 26 were vitamin D deficient and 6 insufficient; moderate persistent asthma, 8 were vitamin D deficient and 4 insufficient. The pre and post mean vitamin D levels were 16.11 ± 5.72 and 50.46 ± 27.87 respectively (p < 0.0001) in the study group and mean vitamin D level in control group was 15.49 ± 4.9. The mean PEFR values were 195.3 ± 53 and 212.2 ± 46.3 (p < 0.0001) in the study group. The mean PEFR values were 190.06 ± 47.3 and 196.6 ± 41.8 (p = 0.08) in the control group.

Conclusion

Vitamin D levels were low in all the 60 asthmatic patients. Administration of vitamin D may prove beneficial as an adjunct to conventional inhalation therapies in asthmatic children. PEFR is a simple, inexpensive diagnostic and monitoring tool for determining airflow obstruction.

P29

The Inspire Project: Identifying suitable methods for delivering tailored interventions for reducing asthma-related school absences

Christina J. Jones1*, Renske McFarlane1, Jeremy Mabbitt2, Esther Kissling3, Kate Gilchrist4, Tom Scanlon1, Kerry Clarke4, Gavin Thomas4, Edwina Wooler5, Somnath Mukhopadhyay1,5

1Academic Department of Pediatrics, Royal Alexandra Children’s Hospital, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, United Kingdom; 2Studybugs, Brighton, United Kingdom; 3EpiConcept, Paris, France; 4Brighton and Hove City Council, Brighton, United Kingdom; 5Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust, Brighton, United Kingdom

Correspondence: Christina J. Jones - c.jones@bsms.ac.uk

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P29

Introduction

Children with poor attendance tend to achieve less in both primary and secondary school, as well as later in life. Illness remains the most common cause of school absences. Asthma is known to be one of the most common non-communicable diseases in children. The Inspire Project aims to assess the feasibility of novel methodology to: i) identify common triggers that may predispose children to asthma exacerbations, and ii) investigate parents’ and teachers’ attitudes towards tailored asthma management guidance, in order to capture information to help reduce asthma-related school absences in the future.

Methods

Studybugs (studybugs.com) is a unique free online service and app used by 850 UK schools representing 23,000 children. Studybugs offers an efficient and secure way for parents to report their child’s school absence and was utilised for this project. The app was adapted to prompt parents to answer questions about what had triggered their child’s asthma exacerbation and subsequent school absence. Parents and teachers familiar with the app were invited to participate in qualitative interviews to provide feedback on the use of the app as an interventional tool. The quantitative data collection period was from 18th May 2017 to 25th July 2017.

Results

Forty-seven asthma absences from 43 unique children were reported, out of 52,454 absence reports. The response rate to the questions was 41.0% (16/39) (in eight episodes questions were not sent out for technical reasons). Parents considered their children’s asthma episodes were caused by hayfever 38.5% of the time, a cold 19.2% and failure of the reliever medication 15.4% of the time. Forty percent of parents planned on taking their child to their GP/asthma nurse/hospital as a result of this asthma exacerbation. Ten parents and teachers consented to be interviewed. Both groups reported ways in which the app might be tailored for intervention purposes, specifically seeing benefit of behavioural interventions, and the best format for delivering health information.

Conclusion

The Inspire project is showing the potential for Studybugs to provide a cost-effective means to collect community-wide data and deliver tailored interventions with the aim of improving children’s health. The large proportion of parents reporting hayfever as a trigger may reflect the spring/summer study period and data collection should be extended to account for seasonal variation. The response rate was high and parents and teachers were both receptive to the benefits of delivering guidance on asthma management via the app.

P30

Acoustic rhinometry in children: Is it a valuable tool for nasal obstruction?

Marialena Kyriakakou1, Olympia Tsilochristou1,2*, Maria Dimou1, Nikos Douladiris1, Nikos Papadopoulos1,3, Vicky Xepapadaki1

1Children’s Allergy Department, 2nd Pediatric Clinic, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece; 2Division of Allergy, Asthma and Lung Biology, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom; 3Division of Infection, Immunity and Respiratory Medicine, The University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom

Correspondence: Olympia Tsilochristou - ol.tsilochristou@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P30

Introduction

Nasal obstruction is a common symptom in individuals with rhinitis. Acoustic rhinometry (AcR) is a noninvasive tool for objective evaluation of nasal obstruction; it is rapid and requires minimal co-operation of the patient under investigation. AcR is mostly used in adults while it is still under validation in children as the smaller sized cavities affect the measurement of the area-distance function. The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) is a subjective, psychometric evaluation of any symptom severity, including obstruction, based on the patient’s perception. It is simple, and has been reported to be sensitive and suitable for everyday use. Few studies have investigated the correlation of the findings from AcR and VAS in children. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy and efficacy of AcR in comparison to VAS in children with nasal obstruction.

Methods

The study population was recruited among the children reporting nasal blockage while attending the Rhinitis Outpatient Clinic of the Allergy Service, “PandA Kyriakou” Children’s Hospital, Athens, Greece during 2016–2017. Children (6–9 years old) completed a VAS for nasal obstruction and underwent AcR at the same consultation. The minimum cross-sectional area (MCA) was measured during AcR, which was performed with the A1 Acoustic Rhinometer (GM INSTRUMENTS LTD, Kilwinning, UK). Data were collected and analyzed by SPSS v.23.0. Results are expressed as the mean and standard deviation, with p < 0.05 set as significant.

Results

Fourty children (22 boys), aged 6–9 years old were evaluated. Two groups were compared; Group (A) with severe nasal obstruction (VAS values: 7–10 cm) and group (B) with moderate nasal obstruction (VAS values: 4–7 cm). There were no children with mild or no nasal obstruction (VAS values: < 4 cm) in our population. The distributions of MCA and VAS were not normal (Saphiro-Wilc test). No significant correlation between VAS and MCA in both groups were found (group A: VAS vs. MCA; r = 0.49 and group B; r = − 0.09).

Conclusion

No statistically significant correlation was documented between AcR values and VAS results in rhinitic children reporting obstruction, suggesting that the methods may identify different aspects of the obstruction and/or that obstruction is experienced differently by each individual. Communication issues may also affect the reporting of obstruction in children. Additional studies are required to identify the optimal use of subjective and objective tools for the management of pediatric rhinitis.

P31

Clinical characteristics of childhood obesity in asthma. Bioasma study preliminar results

Ana Martinez-Cañavate1, Ma Amelia Gomez-Llorente1,2, Raquel Romero3, Natalia Chueca2,3, Carolina Gomez-Llorente2,4, 5*

1Pediatric Unit, Hospital Materno-Infantil, Ciudad Sanitaria Virgen de las Nieves, Granada, Spain; 2ibs, Granada Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria, Granada, Spain; 3Hospital Clínico San Cecilio, Granada, Spain; 4Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II, University of Granada, Granada, Spain; 5CIBEROBN.ISCIII, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y la Nutrición

Correspondence: Carolina Gomez-Llorente - gomezll@ugr.es

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P21

Introduction

Obesity and asthma are two chronic conditions that affect millions of people. Genetic and lifestyle factors such as diet, physical activity and early exposure to microorganisms are important factors. Recently, two major phenotypes of asthma with obesity have been described: one phenotype of early-onset asthma that is aggravated by obesity, and a second phenotype of later-onset that predominantly affects women (1).

The objective is to describe the main clinical and biochemical differences between obese and normal-weight prepubertal asthmatic children.

Methods

We recuited 34 prepubertal asthmatic children, 17 obese and 17 lean, which served as the control group in the Pediatric Unit of the Hospital Materno and from the Hospital Clínico, Granada, Spain. Clinical biomarkers and antropometic measurements were performed according to standardized methods. Data between obese and normal weight children were compared using the t-student or the non-parametric Mann–Whitney U test. In addition, a Spearman correlation between clinical and biochemical characteristics was performed. Statistical analysis was carried out using the SPSS 22.0 software for Windows (SPSS INC., Chicago, IL, USA).

Results

In agreement with the experimental designing, we have found a higher BMI in the obese group than in the control group (P = 0.0001). Moreover, we have also found a different in the Aspartate-alanine transaminase serum concentration (P = 0.020) and in the HOMA index (P = 0.015). In line with this, we have found a positive correlation between the BMI and the Alanine Amino ransferase enzyme (ALT) levels (r =0.516 P = 0.007) and with the HOMA index (r =0.655 P = 0.0001). Another interesting results is the positive correlation between Forced Expiratory Volumen 1 (FEV1) and BMI (r = 0.400 P = 0.030).

Conclusion

In this preliminar study, we have found that asthmatic obese children have higher BMI, ALT and HOMA index than in control group. Regarding asthma characteristic, an increase BMI is associated with a high FEV1 levels. The underlying mechanisms for this associated are not fully elucidated.

This work was supported by the Fundación Progreso y Salud Project number PI-0373-2014 and by Redes temáticas de investigación cooperative RETIC (SAMID RD12/0016/0015.

Reference
  1. 1.

    Gomez-Llorente MA, et al. Obesity and Asthma: a missing link. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18, 1490; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms18071490

     

P32

Risk factors for asthma severity in children—Synergic effect between tobacco smoke exposure and higher levels of allergen-specific IgE sensitization

Filipa Matos Semedo*, Tomaz Elza, Ana Paula Pires, Filipe Inácio

Immunoallergology Department, Hospital de São Bernardo, CH Setúbal, Setúbal, Portugal

Correspondence: Filipa Matos Semedo - pipa.semedo@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P32

Introduction

Asthma is a prevalent chronic disease that imposes a substantial burden on society. In particular, severe asthma is associated with the greatest share of asthma morbidity and economic burden, although its risk factors remain poorly understood. The aim of this study is to examine associations between risk factors for childhood asthma severity and molecular sensitization profile to perennial allergens.

Methods

Cross-sectional study including 72 children with allergic asthma from different outpatient departments (Pediatrics, Allergology, Pulmonology), with sensitization to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, assessed by total immunoglobulin E (IgE) and major specific IgE allergens Der p 1, Der p 2 and Der p 23. Asthma severity was assessed retrospectively from the level of treatment required to control symptoms and exacerbations. Risk factors for asthma severity were analysed.

Results

This study included 72 patients (71% males; mean age, 11.9 years), Median age at onset of asthma symptoms was 2.9 years; 69% also had allergic rhinitis and 19% atopic dermatitis. Potential risk factors for asthma severity were assessed. Concerning allergen sensitization, 37.5% were monosensitized to house dust mites versus 62.5% polisensitized patients (25% to Alternaria alternata). Wheezing respiratory tract illnesses due to viral infection presented in 71% of children until age of 3. Concerning environmental pollution 44% of patients lived in urban area, 8% had passive smoke exposure and 11% had severe asthma exacerbation in previous year. Patients were classified according to controller treatment for 3 months: mild asthma—as-needed reliever medication or low-intensity controller treatment such as inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) or leukotriene receptor antagonist; moderate/severe asthma—ICS with long acting beta-agonists. Children exposed to tobacco smoke presented with higher severity of asthma (Kruskal–Wallis, p < 0.03). Regarding molecular allergen sensitization, higher levels of specific IgE to Der p 1, Der p 2 and Der p 23 in children exposed to passive smoke were associated with more severe asthma (ANOVA p < 0.000, p = 0.001, p = 0.002, respectively).

Conclusion

Evidence supports an association between asthma development and tobacco smoke exposure, suggesting that may also increase risk of IgE sensitization. Current analysis supports passive smoking as a risk factor for asthma severity in children. Higher titters of allergen-specific IgE in children exposed to secondhand smoke correlate with poor asthma control, suggesting synergic effect between higher sensitization levels and passive smoking.

P35

Control of allergic rhinitis on the first year of house dust mite sublingual immunotherapy in adolescence

Silviya Novakova1*, Nonka Mateva2, Plamena Novakova3, Manuela Yoncheva1, Maria Staevska3

1Internal Consulting Department, Allergy Unit, University Hospital “Sveti Georgi”, Plovdiv, Bulgaria; 2Department of Medical Informatics, Biostatistics and e-Learning, Faculty of Public Health, Medical University, Plovdiv, Bulgaria; 3Clinic of Allergy and Asthma, Sofia Medical University, Sofia, Bulgaria

Correspondence: Silviya Novakova - novakova6607@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P35

Introduction

Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a common problem in adolescence with increasing prevalence [1]. It impacts negatively on physical, social, psychological well-being and impairs productivity at school [2, 3]. Despite the availability of medications some patients may not achieve adequate disease control. By analogy with management of asthma, there is a general trend towards the generalization of the “control” approach to other chronic conditions, such as AR [4]. Furthermore, in the last recommendations of the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology, disease control is pointed to be one of the clinical outcome parameters in allergen immunotherapy trials for AR [5].

House dust mites (HDM) are among the leading causes of AR [6]. Patients with HDM allergy typically present with symptoms of moderate-to-severe disease [7]. HDM sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) has been shown to be effective in reducing symptoms and medication requirements in children with AR [8]. However, data on efficacy of SLIT on control of AR is unavailable. The aim of our study was to evaluate control of AR in adolescence after 1 year of HDM SLIT.

Methods

In this real life study a total number of 32 adolescence [20 (62.5%) boys; mean age 14.1, SD 1.61] with clinically relevant sensitization to HDM and AR, treated with HDM SLIT were prospectively evaluated on the first year. Control was assessed by Rhinitis Control Assessment Test (RCAT). Total RCAT score 22 or more indicates that AR symptoms are well controlled.

Results

All included adolescence underwent HDM SLIT in the course of management of their AR according to the instructions of the manufacture (Table 1).
Table 1

.

Gender

n

Boys

20 (62.5%)

Girls

12 (37.5%)

Total

32 (100%)

Age (in years)

 

Range 12–17

 

Boys

14.2 (SD 1.6)

Girls

14.0 (SD 2.6)

Concomitant asthma:

n − 8 (25%)

Patients—characteristics (n number, SD standard deviation)

When assessed on the first year 25 (78.13%) of them were well controlled (Fig. 1): 16 (80%) boys and 9 (75%) girls. No significant gender difference in the number of controlled patients was established (p > 0.05) (Fig. 2).
Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Allergic rhinitis control: patients’ distribution

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Allergic rhinitis control: gender distribution

Disease duration before SLIT initiation was evaluated: 4.08 (SD 1.96) years in well controlled and 3.86 (SD 0.90) in not well-controlled adolescence. No significant difference in disease duration was established (p > 0.05) (Fig. 3)
Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Allergic rhinitis control: relation with disease duration

There was weak negative correlation between disease duration before HDM SLIT and control of AR symptoms when assessed by RCAT (Pearson correlation: − 0.02) (Fig. 4).
Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Correlation between disease duration and RQAT score

Conclusion

HDM SLIT could effectively control AR symptoms in adolescence even on the first year of treatment. Disease duration did not influence control, so it is not late to initiate SLIT at any time in eligible patients.

References
  1. 1.

    Roberts G, Xatzipsalt M, Borrego L M, Custovic A, et al. Pediatric rhinitis: position paper of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. Allergy. 2013; 68: 1102–1116.

     
  2. 2.

    Silva CHM, Silva T, Morales N, Fernandes K, et al. Quality of life in children and adolescents with allergic rhinitis. Braz J Otorhinolaryngol. 2009;75:642–649.

     
  3. 3.

    Mir E, Panjabi C, Shah A. Impact of allergic rhinitis in school going children. Asia Pas Allergy. 2012, 2(2):93–100.

     
  4. 4.

    Bousquet J, Anto J, Demoly P, et al. Severe chronic allergic (and Related) diseases: a uniform approach—A MeDALL—GA (2) LEN—ARIA position paper. Int Arch Allergy Immunol 158: 216–231, 2012.

     
  5. 5.

    Pfaar O, Demoly P, Gerth van Wijk, Bonini S, et al. Recommendations for the standardization of clinical outcomes used in allergen immunotherapy trials for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis: an EAACI Position Paper. Allergy 69: 854–867, 2014.

     
  6. 6.

    Mygind N. Allergic rhinitis. Chem Immunol Allergy. 2014;100: 62–68.

     
  7. 7.

    Demoly P, Broue-Chabbert A, Wessel F, Charter A. Severity and disease control before house dust mite immunotherapy initiation: ANTARES a French observational survey. Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2016; 12:1 -13.

     
  8. 8.

    Canonica GW, Cox L, Pawankar R, Baena-cagnani CE, et al. Sublingual immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization position paper 2013 update. World Allergy Org I. 2014; 7: 1–52.

     

P37

Establishment of a reference database for skin physical parameters in chinese children and adolescents

Jennifer Wing-ki Yau*, Kam-lun Ellis Hon, Ting Fan Leung

Department of Pediatrics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong, China

Correspondence: Jennifer Wing-ki Yau - wingki_yau@link.cuhk.edu.hk

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P37

Introduction

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is prevalent among children in Hong Kong. The disease is characterized by skin dryness, pruritus, and recurrent flexural dermatitis. The niche of the skin could be described by various physical parameters such as skin hydration (SH), transepidermal water loss (TEWL), redness (erythema) and pigmentation (melanin). Nowadays, biomedical devices for measuring these parameters have been developed, which can be integrated into routine primary care services and research. This study aims to build a dataset of these objective measurements to understand inter-individual variations among healthy children and adolescents in Hong Kong, and compare these measurements between AD patients and healthy controls.

Methods

Ethnic Chinese subjects aged below 20 years were recruited during the orientation day of our University and two health promotion events held in October 2016 and April 2017. SH, TEWL, erythema, and melanin were measured by Delfin MoistureMeterSC, Vapometer, and SkinColorCatch at the right mid-forearm respectively. These physical parameters were also measured in participants with self-reported eczema, and their AD severity was evaluated by Nottingham Eczema Severity Score (NESS). Participants with other active skin diseases were excluded. SH and TEWL were log-transformed before analyses. Independent T-test and Spearman’s correlation were used to analyse between-group differences and correlations respectively. All comparisons were made two-tailed, with p value < 0.05 being considered as statistically significant.

Results

A total of 245 subjects enrolled in this study. The mean (standard deviation [SD]) age of these healthy participants was 14.1 (4.6) years. Twenty-three percent of these subjects were male. Age was positively correlated with TEWL (ρ = 0.181, p = 0.016) and melanin (ρ = 0.253, p = 0.001). Male had significantly higher readings than female in terms of skin erythema (p < 0.001) and melanin (p = 0.010) measurements. Meanwhile, 69 subjects with AD were recruited during the two activities. The mean (SD) NESS was 5.8 (4.1). Age was positively correlated with TEWL (ρ = 0.237, p = 0.050). TEWL was significantly associated with AD after age adjustment (p < 0.001).

Conclusion

Skin integrity, redness and pigmentation are influenced by age and gender. TEWL may be a sensitive biomarker for AD in children and adolescents. This database of different cutaneous physical parameters serves as a reference for further research on different pediatric skin diseases in southern Chinese.

Acknowledgements

Funded by Research Committee’s One-off Fund for Research (3132910) of CUHK

P38

Henna tattoo allergy: more than para-phenylenediamine

Esozia Arroabarren*, Marta Anda, Susana Echechipia, Antonio Rodriguez, Maria Alvarez-Puebla, Blanca Garcia

Complejo Hospitalario De Navarra, Pamplona, Spain

Correspondence: Esozia Arroabarren - esoziaa@yahoo.es

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P38

Introduction

Temporary henna tattoos are an increasing cause of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Most cases have been attributed to the para-phenylenediamine (PPDA), added to increase tattoos' duration and darken their colours. However, other sensitizers may be implied too.

Case report

A 7-year old child developed a plaque of itchy erythema followed by localized vesicles and apparent eczema in the forearm. Symptoms began less than 24 h after the application of a temporary black henna tattoo in a street stall, during the summer. Symptoms persisted for 2 months with desquamation and residual hypopigmentation, reproducing tattoo’s shape. The patient made a full recovery. He referred no previous contact with hair dyes or tattoos.

Allergy work-up consisted on patch tests performed with standard set of the Spanish Group for Research in Contact Dermatitis [GEIDC] (TRUE TEST) and natural henna. Positive patch tests were observed at 48 and 96 h with nickel sulphate, P-tert-Butylphenol formaldehyde and Quaternium 15 (probably contained in the tattoo). Natural henna and PPDA tested negative.

Conclusion

ACD cases after black temporary tattoos are well known. Black henna tattoos may induce also other different clinical manifestations. Most of them have been attributed to PPDA. However, there have been only 2 previous reports of tattoo allergy due to the presence of formaldehyde in children. P-tert-Butylphenol formaldehyde can induce both sensitization and contact dermatitis during the first exposition.

Spanish Drug Agency has advised about PPDA allergy risk related to black henna tattoos. However, there is no current mention of other agents, such as P-tert-Butylphenol formaldehyde.

Consent to publish

The authors have obtained parental informed consent of the patient mentioned in the article.

P39

Novel STAT5B mutation causing atopic dermatitis, food allergies, drug allergy, hymenoptera allergy, and complex autoimmunity

Cathal O’Connor1*, Muriel Sadlier1, Alan Irvine1, Timothy Ronan Leahy2, Grainne O’Regan1

1Dermatology department, Our Lady’s children’s Hospital, Crumlin, Dublin, Ireland; 2Immunology department, Our Lady’s children’s Hospital, Crumlin, Dublin, Ireland

Correspondence: Cathal O’Connor - cathaloconnor@umail.ucc.i.e.

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P39

Introduction

Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (STAT) proteins play key roles in growth factor-mediated intracellular signal transduction. Somatic gain of function (GOF) mutations in STAT3 and STAT5 have been described in a variety of haematopoietic malignancies which are often associated with autoimmune phenomena. Germline mutations in STAT1 and STAT3 are associated with early-onset lymphoproliferative disease, autoimmunity and increased susceptibility to infection. STAT5B mutations have not been associated with food, hymenoptera, or drug allergies.

Case report

An 8 months old girl was referred to our dermatology clinic with an urticarial eruption, present from 4 months of age, worse during cold exposure, and clearing only during intercurrent illnesses. Histology showed a leukocytoclastic vasculitis.

She had developed severe atopic dermatitis at 3 months. She had two reactions to almond involving immediate facial and periorbital angioedema and vomiting. She had a similar reaction to avocado, which was also associated with urticaria. She developed erythema and facial angioedema following treatment with oral penicillin. She developed facial angioedema and dysphonia following a wasp sting. All episodes responded to antihistamines. Interestingly, skin prick testing to almond and avocado was negative.

She had multiple features of autoimmunity, including alopecia totalis, aphthous ulcers, attacks of abdominal distension and diarrhea, and peripheral neuropathy. Following episodes of bleeding gums and epistaxis, von Willebrand disease was diagnosed.

She developed a morbilliform rash following MMR vaccination but has not otherwise demonstrated increased susceptibility to infection.

Investigations revealed eosinophilia, and intermittently reduced alternative and classical complement pathways. Inflammatory markers and amyloid A were normal. Immunodeficiency and autoimmune workup was negative. Sequencing of AIRE, NEMO, NOD2, STAT1, STAT3, and DOCK8 did not reveal pathogenic mutations. However, a novel heterozygous GOF mutation was detected in STAT5B p. N642H.

There is a strong family history of autoimmunity with coeliac disease, autoimmune thyroiditis, hyperparathyroidism, hypoparathyroidism, vitiligo, arthritis, lupus, inflammatory bowel disease, Behçet’s disease, and recurrent early pregnancy loss in first and second degree relatives. Her parents do not carry the STAT5B mutation.

Ruxolitinib, a JAK1/2 inhibitor was initiated in October 2016, with excellent effect.

Conclusion

This is the first report of isolated somatic STAT5b GOF mutation in childhood causing the constellation of atopic dermatitis, food allergies, hymenoptera allergy, eosinophila, and complex autoimmunity. The complete phenotype of this condition has not yet been determined.

Consent to publish

The parents of the patient in this case have provided written informed consent for publication of her case.

References
  1. 1.

    Kontro M, Kuusanmaki H, Eldfors S, et al. Novel activating STAT5B mutations as putative drivers of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Leukaemia. 2014;28(8):1738–42

     
  2. 2.

    Toubiana J, Okada S, Hiller J et al. Heterozygous STAT1 gain-of-function mutations underlie an unexpectedly broad clinical phenotype. Blood. 2016; 127(25):3154–64

     
  3. 3.

    Ma CA et al. Somatic STAT5b gain-of-function mutations in early onset nonclonal eosinophilia, urticaria, dermatitis, and diarrhea. Blood 2017 Feb 2;129(5):650–653.

     
  4. 4.

    Kanai T, Jenks J, Nadeau KC. The STAT5b Pathway Defect and Autoimmunity. Front Immunol. 2012 Aug 14;3:234.

     

P40

A distinct T helper subset contributes to the pathogenesis of classically recognized Th2-mediated Food allergic disorders

Erik Wambre*, Blake Rust, Nahir Garabatos Leitón, Veronique Bajzik, Kelly Aldridge

Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason, Seattle, Washington, United States of America

Correspondence: Erik Wambre - EWambre@benaroyaresearch.org

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P40

Introduction

Food allergies manifest in a wide array of clinical symptoms and can lead to fatal anaphylactic reactions. Response to currently available immunotherapies varies greatly and some food allergic patients undergoing therapy experience adverse reactions. Biomarkers that can be used to address such heterogeneity will be of significant clinical interest.

Methods

Peanut allergy was used as an experimental model. A double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) was performed to rule out food allergy in a patient with a history of allergic symptoms. Direct ex vivo pMHCII tetramer staining and CD154 T cell assay were used to compare the functions and phenotypes of peanut specific T cell responses, both in the context of disease and clinical intervention.

Results

In subjects reacting to DBPCFC, we observed two distinct immunotypes in the Peanut-specific T cell populations: a classical allergic TH2A phenotype (CD27-CRTH2 + CCR4 + CCR6-) and a Th17-like phenotype (CD27-CRTH2-CCR4 + CCR6 +). Interestingly, peanut allergic subjects with high IgE levels tend to express a predominantly CRTH2 + phenotype while those with lower IgE levels tend towards a CCR6 + phenotype. We also observed a correlation between decrease of peanut-specific TH2A cells and achievement of peanut desensitization from oral immunotherapy.

Conclusion

Our study emphasizes the heterogeneity of allergen-reactive effector T cell responses in peanut allergic subjects, with two mutually exclusive immunotypes associated with food allergy. These immunotypes are likely the result of different immunologic mechanisms and therefore may require different immunotherapeutic approaches to bring about resolution. Enumeration and characterization of Food allergen-specific T cells can provide essential information about the potency of the immune response and can serve as useful biomarker in study allergic diseases. Peanut allergic Immunotypes dictate both disease manifestation and clinical treatment outcomes following Peanut OIT.

P41

Growth factors play major role in maturation process of airway epithelium in presence of atopy

Taka Styliani1*, Georgountzou Anastasia1, Maggina Paraskevi1, Kokkinou Dimitra1, Stefanopoulou Panagiota1, Stamataki Sofia2, Papakonstantinou Aliki1, Andreakos Evangelos3, Prokopakis Emmanouil2, Papadopoulos Nikolaos1,4

National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 2nd Pediatric Clinic, Athens, Greece; 2 University of Crete, Department of Neurology and Sensory Organs, Heraklion, Greece; 3 Biomedical Research Foundation Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece; 4 University of Manchester, Center for Pediatrics and Child Health, Manchester, United Kingdom

Correspondence: Erik Wambre - takastella@hotmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P41

Introduction

Reepithelialization of the airway mucosa is an essential step toward restoring a normal functionalprotective barrier during the repair of airway epithelial wounds. In the developing lung, growth factors specify patterns of branching, and control airway size and cell fate, among other functions. In the fully developed lung, these signals are presumably balanced to maintain cellular activities at equilibrium, so that normal lung structure and function are preserved. There is still a significant gap of knowledge on the maturation process of growth factors from birth to adulthood and the influence of viral infections in this balance contributing to the generation of abnormal atopic epithelium.

The aim of the present study was to determine the role of growth factors in the maturation process of respiratory epithelium and to investigate the role of viral infections.

Methods

Primary nasal epithelial cells (NECs) in all ages (0–60 years) were derived from healthy (n = 26) and atopic (n = 37) donors. NECs were cultured and infected with Human Rhinovirus 1B (RV1B) and 16 (RV16). Growth factor (EGF, FGF2, VEGFA, PDGFAA and TGFA) were measured in uninfected and infeted cell culture supernatants at 48 h. Age-related reduction of remodeling and angiogenetic factors EGF, FGF2 and TGFA (p < 0.05) was observed in healty NECs.

Results

Opposing results were observed in atopic NECs, with increasing age-related values of these factors. Direct comparison of regression lines between healthy and atopic individuals,

different slopes were observed (p < 0.05) in EGF and FGF2 factors. RV1B induce higher levels of EGF and FGF2 (p < 0.05) and lower VEGF levels compared to uninfected condition (p < 0.05) in both healthy and atopic NECs. RV16 induce EGF, FGF2 and PDGFAA (p < 0.05) in both healthy and atopic NECs. The expression of TGFA do not influced by RV1B or RV16.

Conclusions

This is the first study investigating the maturation process of growth factors in airway epithelium. Atopic epithelium don’t seem to follow the same evolutionary line as healthy. The age-related reduction of basic growth factors (FGF2 and EGF) in healthy NECs reflects the temporal distancing from embryonic stages with strong developmental changes. On the other hand, the atopic NECs do not reduce these factors with age, reflecting their need of remodeling. The viral infections seem to induce strongly these factors and differentially influence healthy and atopic NECs during lifetime.

P42

Stevens–Johnson syndrome allegedly induced by herbal medicine

Shahid P.1*, Drenovska K.2, Shahid M.2, Vassileva S.2, Popov T.1

Department of Allergy, Medical University, Sofia, Bulgaria; 2 Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Medical University, Sofia, Bulgaria

Correspondence: Shahid Polina - poli.mu@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P42

Introduction

Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) is a severe life-threatening skin condition with high mortality rate. Drugs are considered one of the most common causes of SJS. Herbal medicines may also be responsible for this syndrome even though there are only a few cases described in the literature. We report SJS occurring after administration of herbal medicine containing extracts from thuja (Thuja occidentalis), coneflower (Echinacea purpurea et pallida), and wild indigo (Baptista tinctoria) in the context of macrolide intake for current infection.

Case report

A 14-year-old boy with no history of pollen sensitization and atopy was prescribed a product of mixed herbs with proposed immunostimulating effect along with midecamycin treatment for fever and sore throat. Four days after initiation of therapy the child developed severe oral and genital erosions, bilateral conjunctivitis and worsened general condition. High fever and vomiting were accompanied by cough with purulent expectoration. Six days later, urticarial rash followed by “target” lesions on the face, trunk and limbs developed. Laboratory studies revealed markedly elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, mild proteinuria, hematuria, and leukocyturia. Systemic corticosteroids were used as a primary treatment and both herbal tablets and antibiotic were discontinued. The general symptoms quickly resolved and the skin and mucosal lesions completely epithelialized within 2 weeks.

Conclusion

SJS is a dermatological emergency that may result in severe morbidity and mortality. A comprehensive literature review revealed only isolated reports of SJS induced by herbs. In recent years herbal medicine consumption has increased while the safety of herbal drugs remains underinvestigated. In the present case, the intake of herbal tablets was combined with macrolide antibiotic, which could also be suspected as inducing agent. As macrolides have an excellent safety record with very few allergic or pseudo-allergic reactions, we rank midecamycin second to the herbal mix in terms of possible cause of SJS in our case. On the other hand, extracts from Echinacea spp., Echinacea purpurea and Echinacea pallida in our case, as well as wild indigo extracts, are increasingly reported to cause severe allergic reactions. In cases of multicomponent therapy, it is a challenge to identify the offending agent, and subsequent treatments strategies in these patients should be carefully tailored.

Consent to publish

The parents of the patient have provided written consent to publish.

P44

A case of cutaneous mastocytosis

Andreia Forno1, Alexandra Rodrigues1*, Pereira Bárbara2, Andreia Barros1, António Jorge Cabral1

1Pediatrics Department, Hospital Dr. Nélio Mendonça, Funchal, Portugal; 2Dermatology Department, Hospital Dr Nélio Mendonça, Funchal, Portugal

Correspondence: Alexandra Rodrigues - alexandrabrod@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P44

Introduction

Mastocytosis is a rare disorder which prevalence is unknown, and is characterized by excessive mast cell accumulation. In the pediatric population the majority is limited to the skin (cutaneous mastocytosis) and presents itself during the first year of life.

Case report

The prevalence of anaphylaxis reported in the presence of this disease is higher than that reported in the general pediatric population, and more severe anaphylaxis symptoms have been documented in these patients.

The authors present the case of a 2 year old boy, presenting with brown macules and small purpuric skin lesions since 7 months of age. There was no history of systemic symptoms. Upon examination the patient presented the skin lesions in the head, chest and perineum. The pathognomonic Darier’s sign was present, establishing the clinical diagnosis. The rest of the physical examination was normal. Laboratory blood tests were normal, with no eosinophilia and total IgE within the normal range. Serum tryptase levels results have been ordered and are still pending. The patient initiated treatment with antihistamines and was prescribed a self-administration adrenaline pen. Because of the risk of mastocyte degranulation leading to systemic reactions, vaccination was performed in a Hospital setting.

Conclusion

Cutaneous mastocytosis usually has a transitional and benign course in the pediatric population, although there is the possibility of systemic reactions. A detailed anamnesis and laboratory tests, including a blood count and serum tryptase levels, is recommended in all patients. The first-line treatment is the use of H1 antihistamines, but the most important measure to implement is parental education, avoiding triggers of mastocyte degranulation and early recognition of systemic symptoms.

Consent to publish

The parents of the patient have provided written consent to publish.

P49

A retrospective claims database analysis of allergy testing amongst allergists, dermatologists and pediatricians for atopic dermatitis/eczema, allergic reactions, and urticaria in children

Chikoti M. Wheat1∞, Heather C. Rosengard1*, Corinne A. Keet2≠, Bernard A. Cohen3≠

1Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Baltimore, USA; 2Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Baltimore, USA; 3Division of Pediatric Dermatology, Johns Hopkins Childrens’ Center, Baltimore, USA

First authors that contributed equally to this work

Senior authors that contributed equally to this work

Correspondence: Heather C. Rosengard - hroseng1@jhmi.edu

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P49

Introduction

Interpreting allergy tests can be difficult, as most have relatively poor specificity. Little is known about the allergy test ordering practices of generalists and specialists caring for children.

The objective is to determine the rates at which allergists/immunologists, dermatologists, and pediatricians order allergy tests for children diagnosed with atopic dermatitis/eczema, allergic reactions, and urticaria.

Methods

A total of 191,388 children diagnosed with atopic dermatitis/eczema, urticaria, or allergic reactions were included in a retrospective analysis of the Humana database (2008–2015). Poisson regressions were used to quantitatively compare the number of allergy tests ordered by provider type.

Results

Allergists and immunologists consistently ordered percutaneous testing, specific IgE, and total IgE tests at the highest rate. For example, for atopic dermatitis/eczema, allergists/immunologists ordered 0.35 percutaneous tests and 0.32 specific IgEs per patient, compared to 0.08 and 0.08 for dermatologists and 0.05 and 0.07 for pediatricians, respectively. However, with the exception of percutaneous tests for urticaria, pediatricians ordered the highest total number of allergy tests: 50,689 compared to 20,090 ordered by dermatologists and 2,904 ordered by allergist/immunologists. Since these are claims data, we cannot comment on whether the allergy tests in question were appropriately ordered and interpreted.

Conclusions

Because pediatricians and dermatologists order many more allergy tests than allergists/immunologists, it is critical that education efforts target these specialties to ensure high-value, cost-conscious care.

P50

Food sensitization in patients with atopic dermatitis according to severity in a specialized outpatient clinic in Rio de Janeiro

Ekaterini Goudouris*, Camila Lira, Evandro Prado, Fernanda Pinto Mariz, Heloiza Silveira, Maria Fernanda AMA Motta

IPPMG—UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Correspondence: Ekaterini Goudouris - egoudouris@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P50

Introduction

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is multifactorial disease. Food sensitization is quite common, mainly to cow’s milk and egg, according to literature. We aim to report sensitization to foods in patients with AD according to their severity in a specialized outpatient clinic in Rio de Janeiro.

Methods

Retrospective study, through a review of medical records of patients who started follow up between January 2016 and May 2017. We classified patients as: mild AD (MAD)—SCORAD < 25 and moderate-severe AD (MSAD)—SCORAD ≥ 25. We studied the total IgE levels and specific IgE profile, measured by the fluoroimmunoassay method, for cow’s milk (CM) and its proteins, egg yolk, wheat, soy, corn, peanut and beef. IgE values ≥ 0.35 kU/L were considered positive. Patients sensitized to one food were considered “monosensitized”, and those sensitized to 2 or more foods, “polysensitized”.

Results

Among 55 patients, aged between 3 months and 11 years (mean = 4.5 years), 15 (27%) were of the MAD group and 40 (73%), MSAD. Total IgE assay revealed that 33% of MAD and 39% of MSAD presented values > 3000 IU/mL. In the MAD group, 10 patients (66.6%) had positive specific IgE results, being 40% monosensitized, 50% polysensitized and 10% non-sensitized. In the MSAD group, 34 patients (85%) had positive specific IgE, being 18% monosensitized, 53% polysensitized and 29% non-sensitized. Among the foods most implicated in MAD, CM and egg were identified, followed by wheat. In MSAD, the egg is the most important food, followed by CM, wheat and peanuts.

Conclusion

The analysis of the two groups showed that total IgE level was not related to the severity of AD and no significant differences were found in sensitization to one or more foods according to the severity of AD. Egg and CM are the foods most implicated in our patients both with mild and moderate-severe AD.

P51

Profile of pediatric patients in primary immunodeficiency investigation: why they are referred and by whom

Ekaterini Goudouris*, Camila Lira, Evandro Prado, Fernanda Pinto Mariz, Heloiza Silveira, Maria Fernanda AMA Motta

IPPMG - UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Correspondence: Ekaterini Goudouris - egoudouris@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P51

Introduction

Primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) are a heterogeneous group of immune system defects, which are characterized by recurrent infections, as well as allergic, inflammatory, autoimmunity, and malignant manifestations. Although relatively rare, they are increasingly known among general pediatricians and pediatric specialists, but usually focusing on infectious processes. We aim to describe the profile of referral of children and adolescents to an immunology service of a pediatric university hospital in Rio de Janeiro-Brazil.

Methods

Retrospective study, with data collection in medical records of patients attended in the period from 2013 to 2016. We analyzed the following data: origin and reason of the referral, diagnostic hypothesis formulated and final diagnosis.

Results

Of the 217 patients evaluated, 93 were referred by doctors from different pediatric specialties (68.8% from the same university institution and 31.2% from outside) and 124 from general pediatricians (59.7% from the same institution and 40.3% from outside). The most frequent reasons for referral were: recurrent infections (n = 100; 46.1%), severe infections (n = 21; 9.7%), recurrent fever (n = 14; 6.5%), and angioedema without urticaria (n = 14; 6.5%). Among recurrent infections, the most common was pneumonia (n = 31; 34.44%). Of the 146 patients whose diagnostic investigation was completed, the diagnosis of PID was excluded in 65% (n = 95), with the majority being referred for recurrent pneumonia. In 51 patients (35%) the diagnosis was confirmed, being repetitive infections, angioedema without urticaria and alterations in the levels of immunoglobulins the main reasons for referral in these cases. Of the patients referred by general pediatricians, the diagnosis of PID was confirmed in 28.6%, whereas by other specialists in 34.7% and by immunologists, in 76.9% of cases. The diagnostic hypotheses formulated were confirmed in 23 patients, 8.3% (n = 7) of those referred by general pediatrics, 11.1% (n = 7) by specialists non-immunologists, and 69.2% (n = 9) by immunologists.

Conclusion

The diagnosis of PID has not been confirmed in most cases, as seen in many other studies. Most referrals are made by general pediatricians, although they do not fit the diagnostic hypothesis in most cases. Repetitive infections are the main cause for diagnostic suspicion among these professionals. Recurrent fever and other manifestations are uncommon reasons for referral. Continued educational work with general pediatricians and other pediatric specialties is necessary.

P53

Pediatric refractory urticaria … what else?

Barathi Rajendra1*, Jin Ho Chong2

1Department of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Singapore, Singapore; 2Department of Pediatric Dermatology, KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Singapore, Singapore

Correspondence: Barathi Rajendra - Barathi.Rajendra@singhealth.com.sg

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P53

Introduction

Urticaria is a fairly common eruption in childhood. In the vast majority of cases, it is a skin-limited disease, running a benign course. Rarely it may signify more serious underlying disease. We present a case of a 5-year old boy who was treated for refractory urticaria for 6 months before he developed other symptoms that finally led to the diagnosis.

Case report

A 5-year old Chinese boy presented with prolonged fever of 2 months duration associated with an intermittent urticarial looking rash. He did not have any constitutional symptoms nor exhibit any localizing signs on physical examination. Extensive work up was performed including blood work (revealing mild transaminatis with minimally raised C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate and mild anaemia); microbiological studies, abdominal ultrasound scan, chest X-ray, autoimmune screen, bone marrow aspirate and 2-D echocardiography. A cervical lymph node biopsy revealed dermatopathic lymphadenitis. A focus of infection was never found and the child’s fever lysed after 5 days of intravenous Ceftriaxone. He was reviewed in the outpatient department over the next 2 months where he remained clinically well, but parents reported 2 further separate episodes of fever associated with an urticarial rash. He continued to demonstrate mild anaemia with minimally raised inflammatory markers on blood investigations. Prolonged courses of anti-histamines and leukotriene receptor antagonists did not lead to resolution of the rash. Three months after presentation, the parents agreed to a skin biopsy of the urticarial rash. However at this time, parents reported 1 week of high spiking fevers to 40 °C with rash. Clinical examination revealed a linear rash with left wrist effusion. A diagnosis of systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) was made. The child was started on Prednisolone and Methotrexate and continues to be monitored by the Rheumatologists.

Conclusion

The most common presenting features of systemic arthritis in children are fever, arthritis and rash; the rash can be fleeting and correlates to the acute febrile episodes. It is not unusual for the joint symptoms to develop months after the initial fevers and rashes. Our patient had a diagnosis of chronic idiopathic urticaria refractory to treatment. However urticarial ‘mimickers’ are often seen in the context of fevers and extra cutaneous manifestations. It is important to be aware of evolution of symptoms over time.

Consent to publish

The parents of this patient consented to the presentation of his case

P54

Measurement properties of quality-of-life measurement instruments for caregivers of children with atopic eczema: Systematic review

Christina J. Jones1*, Daniel Heinl2, Aaron M. Drucker3, Susanne Brandstetter2, Frank Dodoo-Schittko2, Tracey Sach4, Christian Apfelbacher2,5

1Academic Department of Pediatrics, Royal Alexandra Children’s Hospital, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, United Kingdom; 2Department of Medical Sociology, Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Regensburg, Dr.-Gessler-Str. 17, 93051, Regensburg, Germany; 3Department of Dermatology, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 4Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom; 5Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Falmer, United Kingdom

Correspondence: Christina J. Jones - c.jones@bsms.ac.uk

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P54

Introduction

Atopic eczema (AE) does not only have an often detrimental impact on affected children, but also on their family and caregivers. It is therefore of interest to measure the quality of life (QoL) impact on caregivers of children with eczema in clinical trials. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the measurement properties of existing measurement instruments measuring the QoL of caregivers of children with AE.

Methods

We systematically searched the literature for studies on measurement instruments developed and/or validated for the measurement of QoL in caregivers of children/adolescents with AE. For the studies included, we assessed both the adequacy of investigated measurement properties as well as the methodological study quality using the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist. Results from different studies were summarized in a best-evidence synthesis for each measurement property of each instrument and formed the basis to assign four degrees of recommendation.

Results

Sixteen studies were included reporting on 20 instruments used to measure QoL in caregivers of children with AE: the Parents’ Index of Quality of Life in Atopic Dermatitis (PIQOL-AD) in seven languages, the Dermatitis Family Impact (DFI) in six languages, the Childhood Atopic Dermatitis Impact Scale (CADIS) in four languages, the Family Dermatology Life Quality Index (FDLQI) in Ukrainian, the Quality of Life in Primary Caregivers of Children with Atopic Dermatitis (QPCAD) in Japanese and a German questionnaire by Rueden et al. We found substantial validation gaps. For instance, none of the studies investigated measurement error. Overall, no instrument can be recommended for measuring QoL in caregivers of children with AE because none fulfilled all required adequacy criteria. With adequate internal consistency and reliability, the US version of the Childhood Atopic Dermatitis Impact Scale (CADIS) has the potential to be recommended depending on the results of future validation studies.

Conclusion

Currently, no instruments used to measure caregivers of children with AE can be highly recommended. Further studies filling validation gaps are needed.

P55

Der p 23—molecular components and allergic respiratory disease expression in children

Filipa Matos Semedo1*, Tomaz Elza2, Ana Paula Pires2, Filipe Inácio2

1Immunoallergology Department, Hospital de São Bernardo, CH Setúbal; Faculdade Ciȇncia, Setúbal, Portugal; 2Immunoallergology Department, Hospital de São Bernardo, CH Setúbal, Setúbal, Portugal

Correspondence: Filipa Matos Semedo - pipa.semedo@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P55

Introduction

House dust mites (HDM) represent one of the most important inducers of respiratory allergies worldwide, with up to 85% of allergic asthmatic children being sensitized. Recently, a new major HDM allergen- Der p 23, was identified. It’s recognized by > 70% of HDM-allergic patients, exhibiting high allergenic activity. We sought to investigate a pediatric population of atopic patients with allergy to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus concerning molecular major allergen profile, assessing the relevance of Der p 23 sensitization.

Methods

Retrospective study, including 81 children with allergic rhinitis and/or asthma and reactivity to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus assessed by total immunoglobulin E (IgE) and major specific IgE allergens Der p 1, Der p 2. Serum samples were tested for IgE against Der p 23 and patients were analysed regarding allergic features.

Results

This study included 81 patients (70% males; mean age of 11.7 years), 89% with allergic asthma and 11% with allergic rhinitis only. Concerning prevalence of IgE reactivity, 90% of patients were sensitized to Der p 23. Mean IgE levels (kUA/l) in asthmatic versus rhinitic patients were, respectively: total Der p: 112.2 vs. 83.1; Der p 1: 58.7 vs. 35.2; Der p 2: 58.6 vs. 12.8; Der p 23: 22.3 vs. 12.5. Difference had statistical significance regarding Der p 23 (T test, p = 0.03). In group of asthmatic children, 68% began disease symptoms at age of 3 years old, having mean value of IgE to Der p 23 of 19.6 kUA/l. Also in asthmatic patients, 71% had multiple respiratory viral infections, having mean value of IgE to Der p 23 of 19.4 kUA/l. Severity of asthma, evaluated by treatment control, was higher in 32% of patients (high dose of inhaled corticosteroid or in association with long acting beta-agonists), with mean IgE against Der p 23 of 27.8 kUA/l.

Conclusion

Few is known about the prevalence of IgE against Der p 23 in pediatric patients. Our data indicated a significantly high rate of reactivity to this new major allergen. Mean value of specific IgE to all major allergens were higher in asthmatic children, comparing to those with only rhinitis, this difference being significant for Der p 23. It has been reported that high IgE antibody titers to HDM allergens increased the risk for severity of disease among asthmatic children. This study showed that asthmatic children with early symptoms, multiple respiratory infections and higher severity of illness presented with high levels of IgE to Der p 23.

P56

Severe anaphylaxis to fresh frozen plasma in congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

Anamarija Čavčić1*

1Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Center Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia

Correspondence: Anamarija Čavčić - anacavcic@yahoo.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P56

Introduction

Congenital form of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (cTTP) is consequence of decreased ADAMTS13 activity secondary to mutations within the ADAMTS13 gene [1]. Acute episodes of cTTP are treated with plasma exchange (PEX) or plasma infusion alone in a similar way to acquired TTP while immunosuppression is not indicated [2]. Despite treatment improvements, TTP still has a high mortality rate.

Case report

A 5 year-old boy with recurrent episodes of hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and hematuria since early infancy was diagnosed with cTTP (activity level of ADAMTS13 < 5%, without evidence of anti-ADAMTS13 antibodies). The treatment with fresh frozen plasma (FFP) infusions 10 mg/kg every third week has been started. Due to allergic reactions complicating every exposure to plasma, prophylaxis with systemic steroids and antihistamines was used. Despite of prophylactic treatment the patient developed anaphylaxis, with generalised hives, angioedema, dyspnea, bronchospasm, stridor and hypoxemia (SpO2 89–90%). Epinephrine 0.5 mg has been administered immediately, intramuscularly along with supplemental oxygen followed by nebulized salbutamol 2.5 mg every 20 min. Methylprednisolone 1 mg/kg iv; diphenhydramine 1 mg/kg iv. and cetirizine 10 mg orally were the second line medications and recovery was achieved within an hour. Subsequently, FFP has been replaced by solvent/detergent-treated pooled plasma (OCTAPLAS LG). Throughout the 14 month period the evidence confirmed advantage of solvent/detergent-treated pooled plasma over the FFP regarding efficacy and safety.

Conclusion

Patients with cTTP have a significant lifetime exposure to plasma and therefore, the safest product of solvent/detergent-treated pooled plasma should be choice of therapy in pediatric patients with anaphylaxis to FFP.

Consent to publish

The patient has given written permission for the author to publish the case report.

P57

Treatment of anaphylaxis from general practitioners and specialists. Do they know what they are supposed to do?

Konstantinos Kakleas1*, Sophie Farooque1

1Allergy Department, St Mary’s Hospital, London, United Kingdom

Correspondence: Konstantinos Kakleas - Konstantinos.kakleas@bartshealth.nhs.uk

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P57

Introduction

Anaphylaxis is a severe and potentially life-threatening multisystem allergic reaction. The prevalence of anaphylaxis is 0.3% [1] and the mortality 0.001% [2]. Prompt recognition and treatment by medical professionals is vital. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge of anaphylaxis management by general practitioners and physicians.

Methods

Data were collected from a questionnaire designed by our team and given out prior to educational sessions. Data from 86 medical professionals was collected (General Practitioners (n = 44) and Specialist trainees (n = 42)

Results

70% of the participants (59/86) had received postgraduate anaphylaxis training and 63% (54/86) said they were confident in the treatment of anaphylaxis. However, only 10% correctly reported the correct dose, route and concentration of Adrenaline to be administered during an anaphylactic reaction.

In the case of anaphylaxis whilst 83% of respondents would use Adrenaline as first choice drug, 79%of respondents would administer incorrect adult dose, 70% would use an incorrect concentration of Adrenaline and9% would inject adrenaline subcutaneously. Only 30% of the participants answered correctly the adrenaline concentration (1:1000). Furthermore, over 65% of physicians were unaware of the ALS guidelines stating patients should be treated in a supine position with legs raised if their breathing is not impaired.

Doctors also were unclear about when Adrenaline is the drug of choice in anaphylaxis management. If the patient had urticarial rash as their only symptom then 14% of medical staff would give Adrenaline as the first line drug of choice before antihistamines and steroids. However if the urticarial rash was associated with throat tightness, hypotension or wheeze the percentages would increase to 75, 81 and 70% respectively. Only 37% of respondents would administer Adrenaline as a first line agent if wheeze was the only symptom and would preferentially treat with nebulised salbutamol.

Conclusions

Hospital physicians and GPs are frequently the first line responders in anaphylaxis. Immediate treatment according to UK resus council guidelines should include adrenaline, oxygen and fluids.

In this cohort only 10% of those questioned knew the correct dose, route and concentration of Adrenaline as per UK resuscitation council guidelines [3]. The majority of medical professionals would not give adrenaline if wheeze was the only symptom although in 20% of individuals with anaphylaxis wheeze is the only presenting feature (4). This knowledge gap suggests improved training and use of clear posters and cognitive aidscould improve the diagnosis and management of anaphylaxis by medical practitioners [5].

References
  1. 1.

    Panesar SS, Javad S, de Silva D, Nwaru BI, Hickstein L, Muraro A et al. The epidemiology of anaphylaxis in Europe: a systematic review. Allergy. 2013 Nov;68(11):1353–61

     
  2. 2.

    Dhami S, Panesar SS, Rader T, Muraro A, Roberts G, Worm M, et al. The acute and long-term management of anaphylaxis: protocol for a systematic review. Clin Transl Allergy. 2013 Apr 10;3(1):14.

     
  3. 3.
     
  4. 4.

    Sampson HA1, Muñoz-Furlong A, Bock SA, Schmitt C, Bass R, Chowdhury BA, Decker WW et al. Symposium on the definition and management of anaphylaxis: summary report. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2005 Mar;115(3):584–91.

     
  5. 5.

    Kolawole H, Marshall SD, Crilly H, Kerridge RK, Roessler P ANZAAG/ANZCA Perioperative Anaphylaxis Management Guidelines. Anaesth Intensive Care 2017: 45 (2) 151–8

     

P59

Growth of children with food allergies in Singapore

Chong Kok Wee1*, Wright Karen1, Goh Anne1, Meyer Rosan2, Rao Rajeshwar1

1KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Singapore, Singapore; 2Imperial College, London, United Kingdom

Correspondence: Chong Kok Wee - chong.kok.wee@singhealth.com.sg

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P59

Introduction

Although it is known that children with food allergies are at risk of impaired growth, no data has been published from South East Asia on growth related to type of allergy, number of foods eliminated and allergic co-morbidities.

Methods

Anthropometric data, including weight and length/height was collected during patient’s routine allergy clinic visit. Demographic data, including type of food allergy (IgE and non-IgE), foods eliminated and atopic co-morbidities were recorded. All data was collected anonymously as part of an international multicentre study. Malnutrition was defined according to World Health Organization standards [≤ -2 Z-score for weight for height (WH), weight for age (WA) and height for age (HA)].

Results

Seventy-four patients (51% male) were recruited over 1 month, with a median age at diagnosis of 8 months (IQR: 4–13) and at data collection of 25 months (IQR: 14–48). Sixty-two (84%) had IgE-mediated allergy, 8 (11%) mixed IgE and non IgE and 4 (5%) non IgE-mediated allergy. Food exclusions: 55% one food, 27% two foods, 8% three to four foods and 10% ≥ 5 foods. Only 1% were underweight (WA ≤ -2 Z-score) and 3% had WA ≥+2 Z-score. Excluding more than 1 food significantly reduced WA (p = 0.023). WA was significantly lower for those referred to the dietitian (p = 0.027). 5.6% were stunted (HA ≤ -2 Z-score). Factors significantly associated with stunting were underlying eczema (p = 0.03) and having an IgE-mediated (p = 0.03) or mixed type food allergy (p = 0.002). 1.4% were undernourished (WH ≤ -2 Z-score) and 1.4% were overweight (WH ≥+2 Z-score). Multivariate regression analysis found that children with multiple food allergies were significantly shorter (Z-score -1 lower) when compared to those avoiding only one food. Children had a lower WA if they had skin involvement as part of their symptom presentation.

Conclusion

This is the first survey documenting growth in children with food allergy in Singapore. We found that stunting is more common in this cohort and appears to be linked not only to the number of foods excluded, but also to co-existent eczema and type of allergic disease namely, IgE and mixed type allergies. Children referred to the dietitian were significantly smaller, suggesting that this group are in need of earlier dietetic and nutrition advice. The impaired growth in these children is likely due to a combination of factors: the general inflammatory response affecting the absorption and utilisation of nutrients, as well as the elimination diet.

P60

Evaluation of the oral food challenge with baked milk and egg in pediatric patients

Sirin Kose Seda*, Atakul Gizem, Asilsoy Suna, Uzuner Nevin, Karaman Ozkan, Anal Ozden

Dokuz Eylul University Faculty of Medicine Department of Immunology and Allergy, Izmir, Turkey

Correspondence: Sirin Kose Seda - sedasirin85@yahoo.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P60

Introduction

Food allergy in pediatric age group most commonly occurs with cow’s milk and egg. The oral food challenge (OFC) is considered the “gold standard” for diagnosing food allergy. Recent studies suggest that 70% of patients with cow’s milk and egg allergy can tolerate the baked products. It is also reported that the consumption of these products increases the tolerance to allergens. In this study, we aimed to investigate the clinical, laboratory findings of patients in whom OFC was performed with baked cow’s milk and egg.

Methods

This study was performed in Department of Immunology and Allergy of Dokuz Eylul University Hospital between March 2015 and July 2016. Twenty-nine patients, diagnosed as cow’s milk and/or egg allergy, with medical history, clinical findings and laboratory findings were enrolled in the study. In all patients, OFC with baked milk and/or egg was performed according to allergy type.

Results

Six patients with egg allergy, 10 patients with cow’s milk allergy, 13 patients with both cow’s milk and egg allergy were evaluated. Eleven (37.9%) patients were female and the mean age of patients was 36.5 ± 24.3 months (2–90). Eleven (37.9%) and 7 (24.1%) patients were admitted with the skin and gastrointestinal findings, respectively. In seven (24.1%) patients, anaphylaxis had occurred due to food allergy. Oral food challenges with baked cow’s milk and egg were performed in 8 (27.6%) and 1 (3.4%) patients, respectively. Also, in 20 (%69) patients, OFC with both baked cow’s milk and egg was performed. Complication of OFC was determined in only one case as vomiting. No adverse reaction was defined in 28 (96%) patients. In patients with cow’s milk allergy, patients with anaphylaxis (n = 5) had higher milk-specific IgE levels compared to patients without anaphylaxis (n = 5) (p = 0.047). After the OFC with baked products, 12 (41.3%) patients became able to consume cow’s milk and egg.

Conclusion

In this study, consistent with the literature, almost all patients with cow’s milk and egg allergy were able to well tolerate OFC with baked products. Moreover, nearly half of the patients became able to consume cow’s milk and egg safely, following the OFC with baked milk and egg.

P61

The effectiveness of symptom-based score on the diagnosis and follow-up of food allergy

Sirin Kose Seda*, Atakul Gizem, Asilsoy Suna, Uzuner Nevin, Karaman Ozkan, Anal Ozden

Dokuz Eylul University Faculty of Medicine Department of Immunology and Allergy, Izmir, Turkey

Correspondence: Sirin Kose Seda - sedasirin85@yahoo.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P61

Introduction

Symptom-based score (SBS) is a scoring system developed based on the symptoms and findings of the patients to predict cow’s milk allergy in primary health care. It can also be used in follow-up of infants with cow’s milk allergy.

Although recent studies were performed to assess the efficiency of SBS on the diagnosis of cow’s milk allergy in infants, there was limited data about the SBS in literature. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effectiveness of SBS on the diagnosis and in monitoring the response to treatment in patients with food allergy.

Methods

Between July 2016 and February 2017, we evaluated 93 cases who were diagnosed as food allergy, in pediatric immunology and allergy clinic. Symptom-based scoring form which includes crying, regurgitation, Bristol stool scale, skin symptoms (atopic dermatitis and urticaria score), and respiratory symptoms scores was performed. Demographic and laboratory findings were recorded for all patients before elimination diet treatment. After 8 weeks of treatment, SBS was recalculated.

Results

Ninety-three patients were enrolled in the study. Of these, 46 (49.5%) were female and 47 (50.5%) were male. The mean age of the patients was 5.6 ± 0.2 months. Atopy history in family was found in 72% of patients. Cow’s milk and egg allergy were determined in 17 (18.3%) and 23 (24.7%) patients, respectively. Both cow’s milk and egg allergy was determined in 14 (15.1%) patients. IgE-mediated, non-IgE-mediated and mixed immune reactions were revealed, in 26 (28%), 23 (24.7%) and 44 (47.3%) patients, respectively. Before elimination diet, mean SBS was calculated as 12.9–4.7. Eight weeks after the elimination diet, mean SBS decreased to 3.7 ± 2.7. In the analysis of IgE-mediated, non-IgE-mediated and mixed immune reaction groups, urticaria score and SBS score were found to be higher in IgE-mediated group than the other groups (p < 0.0001; p = 0.01). Bristol stool scale was higher in non-IgE-mediated group (p = 0.007).Atopic dermatitis score was found to be higher in mixed immune reaction group (p < 0.0001). Serum IgE level and percentage of eosinophils in complete blood count were higher in IgE-mediated group (p < 0.0001; p = 0.01). Eight weeks after the elimination diet, no difference was determined between the SBS of three groups.

Conclusion

The results of this study suggested that SBS can be used in diagnosis and monitoring the response to treatment in infants with food allergy. Moreover, this is the first study performed to date that revealed the effectiveness of SBS in egg allergy besides cow’s milk allergy.

P62

Supervised Feed Challenges—A safe and effective method of diagnosing food allergy?

Foley Gary, Kakleas Kostas, Ali LuuL, Ling Francis, Noimark Lee

Dept. of Paediatric Allergy, The Royal London Hospital, London, UK

Correspondence: Foley Gary - ofoghlug@tcd.i.e.

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P62

Introduction

The diagnosis of type one mediated food allergy still rests on the pillars of clinical history, examination and investigation - with clinical history holding a lot of weight. The investigations of choice when needed are skin prick testing (SPT), antigen specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) blood investigations and oral food challenges. Oral food challenges provide a real time experience of whether a food allergy exists or not. These can be quite time consuming, and when in doubt, waiting times can delay a confirmatory diagnosis. In recent years a new format of oral food challenge- the supervised feed has emerged. This has now been introduced in many hospitals to try and expedite food challenges for those who meet strict criteria.

Methods

A retrospective audit was performed in the Royal London Hospital using the oral food challenge computerised database. 54 supervised feeds to three common allergy associated tree nuts from the previous 12 months were analysed; hazelnut (n = 21), cashew nut (n = 17) and almond (n = 16). The criteria for a supervised feed to occur were: 1. No previous known serious allergic reactions, 2.SPT 0–2 mm and/or 3. Specific IgE < 0.1. Tolerance verses food allergy confirmation and severity of allergic reaction were the main outcomes measured.

Results

Of the supervised feeds, 48 children were tolerant of the food showing no immediate reaction, 5 (almond n = 3 and hazelnut n = 2) were shown to have immediate allergic reactions. Nearly half (n = 25) were supervised feeds were more than one tree nut was given (e.g. hazelnut + almond).Of this group 1 child suffered a mild allergic reaction and was subsequently booked into conduct separate food challenges on the tree nuts in question. No children required intramuscular adrenaline or respiratory support, and all allergic reactions (n = 5) were treated with second-generation antihistamines (cetirizine).

Conclusion

Our results show that supervised feeds, using specific criteria provide a safe and practical means of diagnosing or ruling out a specific food allergy. This can lead to a greater amount of challenges being performed earlier in the disease course giving an earlier indication to the extent of the food allergy. Given the results it may be possible to alter the supervised feed criteria, but further evaluation will be needed

P63

Two episodes of anaphylaxis by intake of Rosaceae fruits: cherry and apple in a Mediterranean country

Angela Llaneza*, Jose María Maillo del Castillo

Complejo Asistencial de Ávila, Ávila, Spain

Correspondence: Angela Llaneza - allanezamartin@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P63

Introduction

Allergic food reactions are the most common cause of anaphylaxis outside the Hospital setting. Fruits of the rosaceae family are the vegetable foods that most frequently produce allergic reactions. In the Mediterranean countries, allergic reactions following ingestion of rosaceae are more severe and are not preceded by sensitization to birch pollen, but to lipid transport proteins (LTP).

Case report

9-year-old boy shows anaphylaxis episode (urticaria, facial angioedema, hand edema and respiratory distress) while playing in an area of rose bushes, in May, and 3 h after having eaten pork loin with cheese and a cherry “that did not feel well”. In Primary care, methylprednisolone and intravenous dexchlorpheniramine were administered, with remission of symptoms. After being studied, it had been recommended to avoid rosaceae fruit intake and autoinjective adrenaline had been indicated, nevertheless a second event happened. Two years later, in April, he presented a new episode of anaphylaxis (pruritus and heat in the face and thorax, eyelids and lips edema, swelling of hands and respiratory distress) immediately after eating half a red apple, also transferred to the health centre where same treatment was given with slower resolution of symptoms.

Since childhood, after contact with peach and paraguayan skin, edema and erythema in contact zone appears. With spoonful of yogurt peach flavour also refers to lip edema. No rhinoconjunctival symptoms in spring, no bronchospasm.

Prick skin tests positive for grass and olive pollen, peach skin, cherry, apple, almond and LTP. IgE specific: peach class 3, pru p3 9.78 kU/l moderate level, pru p1 PR-10 not detected, cherry 7 kU/l moderate level, olive class 1, dactylis glomerata class 4, phleum pratense class 4, cynodon dactylon class 2.

Conclusion

We describe double severe episodes of anaphylaxis due to ingestion of rosaceae fruits in the time of grasses pollination as adjuvant factor.

In Spain, apple and cherry allergy is more frequently severe (> 35% systemic reactions). There is primary sensitization to other fruits of the family, such as peach, with sensitization to LTP that indicates possibility of systemic and severe reaction.

After the study, hypersensitivity to grass pollen is shown as usual as part of pollen-fruit syndrome, with rosaceae.

It is important to continue teaching health professionals and patients themselves on the correct treatment of an anaphylaxis event. Although those were satisfactorily resolved, the first line of treatment recommended in clinical guidelines: adrenaline IM, was not employed.

Consent to publish

The authors have obtained parental informed consent of the patient mentioned in the article.

P64

Silkworm pupa anaphylaxis

Charoenying Yingwan*, Chansakulporn Somboon

Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Pediatric, Faculty of Medicine, Srinakarinwirot U, Bangkok, Thailand

Correspondence: Charoenying Yingwan - yingwan1doc@yahoo.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P64

Introduction

Silkworm pupae (Bombyx mori) are the important source of protein and other nutrients delicacies for Asian and Thai people. Anaphylactic reactions after silkworm pupa ingestion have rarely been described in the medical literature.

Case report

We reported a 6-year-old, non-atopic female suffering an episode of anaphylaxis including generalized urticaria, crampy abdominal pain with vomiting and wheezing after ingestion of fried silkworm pupae for 30 min with no symptoms in other family members who ate the same. The diagnostic test was performed to confirm IgE-mediated reaction with skin prick test for silkworm pupa and the result was positive.

Conclusion

Silkworm pupae are the newly recognized food as the trigger of anaphylaxis. Healthcare professionals and consumers should be aware of life-threatening reactions from this food source. Major allergens of these silkworm pupae and risk of anaphylaxis after ingestion might need to be further explored.

Consent to publish

The parent of this patient has given her consent for her child‘s information for presentation and publication.

P65

Evaluation of knowlwdge about anaphylaxis among medicine students and implementation of a practical training program

Aída Del Campo García, Sara Pereiro Fernández*, Alicia Costas Aguado, Fernando Bandrés Sánchez-Cruz, Jose Ramón Fernández Lorenzo

Hospital Álvaro Cunqueiro, Vigo, Spain

Correspondence: Sara Pereiro Fernández - palas89@hotmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P65

Introduction

The increase of food allergies in children during the last decades has raised the anaphylaxis cases number. For this reason, it is absolutely necessary that any doctor knows how to identify and how to treat anaphylaxis correctly. Therefore, it should be part of the academic university health education.

Methods

We performed two methodological approaches. The first one was a descriptive study of the knowledge about anaphylaxis in a series of medical students using a questionnaire. The second one was an quasi-experimental analytical study in which we compared the previous results with those obtained after organized and carried out an anaphylaxis workshop. The workshop consisted in 45 min of a theoretical and practical training.

Results

We included 315 survey respondents (66% women) who belonged to 3°, 4°, 5° and 6° years of medicine. The successful answers number in the test which was carried out before the workshop was bigger among the two higher courses. The difference from the other courses was statistically significant. Before attending the workshop, 21.6% of the total recognize the anaphylaxis symptoms, rising to 81.9% later. 32.7% of them considered adrenaline as a treatment which you can choose or no, rising up to 94.2% afterwards. This represents a statistically significant change.

Regarding the right use of auto-injectors, it was well identified by the 44.4% of the students before attending the workshop. This percentage turns into 87.6% after the workshop. In relation to the questions posed as an anaphylaxis clinical case in pediatrics and before attending the workshop, 38.4% of the total would diagnose anaphylaxis and a percentage of 34.9 would act correctly. After attending the workshop, 93.6% would diagnose this allergic reaction and 69.5% would act properly, which represents a statistically significant change. 64% of the students rated negatively the received training about anaphylaxis in the university curriculum. 77% of the students valued the training positively.

Conclusion

The development of a theoretical and practical workshop on anaphylaxis in children and on the management of auto-injectable adrenaline within the university education in medicine increases the knowledge of future doctors and enables them to perform correctly in our sample. The success of our study suggests the need to include practical training in anaphylaxis in the medicine university curriculum.

P66

Diagnosis and management of cow’s milk protein allergy—How big is the gap between ideal and reality? A quality-of-care survey in Europe

Katharina Werkstetter1, Ania Chmielewska2, Jernej Dolinšek3, Frederiek Estourgie-van Burk4, Ilma Korponay-Szabó5, Kalle Kurppa6, ZrinjkaMišak7, Alexandra Papadopoulou8, Alina Popp9, Carmen RibesKoninckx10, Boglárka Szentes1, Peter Szitanyi11, Anna Theisen1, Riccardo Troncone12, Gabor Veres13, Christina West2, Sibylle Koletzko1*

1Ludwig Maximilian’s University Munich Medical Center, Dr. von Hauner Children’s Hospital, Munich, Germany; 2Department of Clinical Sciences, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden; 3University Medical Centre (UMC) Maribor, Maribor, Slovenia; 4Department of Pediatrics, Academic Medical Centre (AMC) Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 5Celiac Disease Centre, Heim Pál Children’s Hospital, Budapest, Hungary; 6Tampere Centre for Child Health Research, University of Tampere and Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland; 7Referral Centre for Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Children’s Hospital Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia; 8Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Unit, First Department of Pediatrics, “Aghia Sofia” Children’s Hospital, Athens, Greece; 9“Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania; 10Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Hepatology, La Fe University Hospital, Valencia, Spain; 11Department of Pediatrics, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic; 12Department of Translational Medical Science and European Laboratory for Food-Induced Disease, University Federico II, Naples, Italy; 13First Department of Pediatrics, Semmelweiss University, Budapest, Hungary

Correspondence: Sibylle Koletzko - sibylle.koletzko@med.uni-muenchen.de

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P66

Introduction

In 2012 the ESPGHAN published guidance for diagnosis and management of cow’s milk protein allergy (CMPA) [1]. We conducted a quality-of-care survey across Europe to evaluate the implementation in primary care practice.

Methods

From 2/2015 to 12/2016, an anonymous online-survey was sent to pediatricians and/or general practitioners in 13 countries (Croatia, Czech Republic, Finland, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Romania, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the Netherlands). Participants were invited via email by their respective medical association. The survey included demographic questions and medical case-examples with multiple-choice answers regarding CMPA management.

Results

In total 2551 physicians completed the survey (72% female, 86.8% pediatricians). Being asked how to exclude CMPA in a 10-month old infant with chronic diarrhoea and failure to thrive, 68% correctly chose an elimination diet and challenge procedure in case symptoms improve. However, 19% regarded a negative specific IgE result and 8% a negative skin prick-test as sufficient to exclude CMPA, while 5% would eliminate lactose. The question which other formulas are allowed for an infant diagnosed with CMPA, but refusing extensively hydrolysed formula, was correctly answered by 63% with amino acid-based and 51% soy-based formula, but 19% considered partially hydrolysed, 11% goat’s milk-based and 6% lactose-free cow’s milk-based formula as adequate. The question what to advise in a so far exclusively breast-fed 5-month-old infant developing swelling of lips and eyelids on drinking his 2nd bottle of infant formula, was correctly answered by 26% to resume complete breastfeeding under usual diet of the mother, while 46% would advise breast-feeding under maternal elimination of dairy products, 21% would switch to an extensively hydrolysed and 6% to an amino-acid-based formula. Being asked what to advise for the same child in terms of complementary foods (CF), 53% would start but strictly avoid CMP, while 15% would also eliminate other potent allergens until 12 months, 25% would recommend CF after 6 months and 5% would start without any restrictions. When having tested this child negative for specific IgE, 46% would still perform supervised CMP challenge, 36% would continue elimination diet until 12 months, 7% would consider CMPA as unlikely, 6% would test C1-esterase-inhibitor-deficiency and 5% for IgG against CMP.

Conclusions

Our results disclose major deficits in the management of CMPA, particularly how to test, when to perform elimination diet and what types of infant formulas to use. Appropriate dissemination and training activities in primary health care settings are needed.

Reference

1. Koletzko S, Niggemann B, Arato A, et al. Diagnostic Approach and Management of Cow’s-Milk Protein Allergy in Infants and Children: ESPGHAN GI Committee Practical Guidelines. JPGN 2012;55:221–229

P67

Legume sensitisation, allergic reaction and treatment in an East London population

Anna Burford, Garry Foley, Luul Ali, Frances Ling, Rozalynd Gourgey, Konstantinos Kakleas*, Lee Noimark

Pediatric Allergy Department, Royal London Hospital, London, United Kingdom

Correspondence: Konstantinos Kakleas - koskakl2@yahoo.gr

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P67

Introduction

Legumes are recommended by health organisations as staple food due to their low cost, high protein, lipid and vitamin content [1]. The widespread use of legumes has resulted in an increased prevalence of allergy. There is also significant cross-reactivity between different legumes due to the presence of structurally homologous proteins [2]. The aim of this study was to assess sensitisation and clinical reaction to various legumes.

Methods

Data was retrospectively collected from electronic records for children diagnosed with legume allergy (lentils, beans, chickpea, green pea). 32 patients were identified. Carers/patients completed a questionnaire. Skin prick testing was undertaken for 13 different legumes.

Results

Mean age of first reaction was 1.78 years (SD ± 1.7 years). Red lentil was reported as the most common allergenic legume (37.5%, 12/32) followed by chickpea (9.4%) and 9.4% reacted to both chickpea and red lentil. Half of patients with legume reactions reported involvement of respiratory system (50%, 16/32), however only one patient had been treated with adrenaline (3.1%). One in four tolerated chickpeas, 15% haricot beans, 9.1% green pea and 6% red lentils. Children who tolerated chickpea had skin prick tests (SPT) between 0 and 7 mm. Patients who tolerated green pea and lentil had SPT 0–3 mm and all patients who tolerated haricot bean had 0 mm. 9.3% reacted to multiple pulses. 66% of patients who reacted to red lentil tolerated chickpea and beans, whereas 33% of patients with chickpea allergy tolerated red lentils.

Conclusion

Legume allergy presents in the first 3 years of life. Red lentils and chickpeas are the commonest allergens. 10% of these East London patients had reactions to multiple legumes. The majority of patients with red lentil allergy tolerated chickpea and beans, but only one-third of patients with chickpea allergy tolerated red lentil. Management of anaphylaxis was suboptimal.

References
  1. 1.

    Duranti M. Grain legume proteins and nutraceutical properties. Fitoterapia. 2006 Feb;77(2):67–82.

     
  2. 2.

    Verma AK, Kumar S, Das M, Dwivedi PD. A comprehensive review of legume allergy. Clin Rev Allergy Immunol. 2013 Aug;45(1):30–46

     

P68

A thematic analysis of coping in adolescents aged 12–16 years old with food allergy

Jennifer Hammond*, Richard Cooke, Rebecca Knibb

Aston University, Birmingham, United Kingdom

Correspondence: Jennifer Hammond - hammojl2@aston.ac.uk

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P68

Introduction

The prevalence of food allergy appears to be increasing, and the highest proportion of fatalities have been linked to this population. However, research in this age group specific to coping is limited.

Methods

Participants were recruited via allergy clinics in Birmingham, or via advertisements by Allergy UK. Individual interviews were conducted with nineteen adolescents (face to face or over Skype) between the ages of 12 and 16 years old, recorded and then transcribed verbatim. Data was analysed using thematic analysis, following the guidelines by Braun and Clarke (2006).

Results

The thematic analysis produced four key themes that explore how adolescents cope with their food allergy. (1) calculating and managing risk, (2) growing up with food allergy, (3) facilitating and using social support, (4) emotional experience of food allergy. These themes highlight the complexities involved with coping with a food allergy, particularly as different environments and experiences can influence certain coping strategies, and evaluation of risk. Risk-taking can occur if an adolescent assesses their risk to be low when it’s not. However, many have a strategy in place to ensure their safety, and avoid allergic reactions. Growing up with a food allergy can be challenging in terms of the transition of responsibility from the parent to the adolescent, to changes in their social experience. However, duration living with a food allergy can be beneficial with regards to the development and use of coping strategies. Social support remains important, and although many facilitate support by teaching friends and peers about their food allergy, there is still a heavy reliance on parents, particularly for emotional support. The adolescents interviewed also discussed the emotional experience of living with a food allergy, and how they cope with this.

Conclusion

This study has given us the opportunity to further explore how adolescents between the ages of 12–16 cope with a food allergy. There is a difference in how this age group calculate risk dependent on their experience or environment which can influence their risk-taking behaviour. It has demonstrated how coping strategies are affected by a change in responsibility, and how they adapt to this, particularly as they begin to socialise more independently with their friends. There is still a dependence on parent’s emotional social support, particularly around feelings of anxiety and sadness around their food allergy. These findings help us to add to the existing literature in this field, which is limited in this age group.

P69

Date palm pollen: a trigger of anaphylaxis and allergic rhinitis in the same patient

Shendi Hiba*

Tawam Hospital, Alain, United Arab Emirates

Correspondence: Shendi Hiba - hshendi@seha.ae

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P69

Introduction

Allergic rhinitis is common in the Middle East, affecting 10% of individuals aged 4 years or older [1]. In the United Arab Emirates (UAE), common triggers are dust, grass/tree pollen and animal dander [2, 3].

Date palm pollen is significant trigger in areas where date palm trees are grown; including the Middle East, Mediterranean and North Africa [4–6].

Dates are a sweet fruit commonly eaten in the Middle East and neighbouring countries. Allergy to date fruit has been described [7].

The oral administration of date palm pollen has been used to improve male fertility [8] and as a suspension to reduce mouth ulcers and pain in cancer patients [9]. In some areas of the UAE, the pollen is occasionally incorporated into a cooked dish, or eaten as a light snack directly from the palm tree itself.

Case report

This case describes an 11 year old Emirati boy, who presented with generalised urticaria, facial swelling and shortness of breath immediately following ingestion of fresh date palm pollen directly from the tree. He was taken to Hospital where he was noted to have generalized urticaria, facial angioedema, respiratory distress and wheezing.

He has a 5 year history of intermittent, allergic rhinitis and conjunctivitis symptoms that tend to worsen on exposure to palm trees. They do not have pets at home and he is able to tolerate a varied diet including date fruit, without adverse effects.

Specific IgE testing confirmed sensitization to date palm pollen.

The results of specific IgE tests performed on Phadia 250 are shown in Table 1.
Table 1

Results of specific IgE tests

Allergen

Specific IgE level reference (0–0.34)

Bahia grass

0.03KUA/L

Bermuda grass

0.02KUA/L

Cat dander epithelium

5.94KUA/L

Cockroach

0.05KUA/L

Date

0.04KUA/L

Date palm pollen

33.3KUA/L

Dog dander

1.10KUA/L

House dust mite panel

0.14KUA/L

Goat epithelium

0.22KUA/L

Conclusion

A case of anaphylaxis following the ingestion of date palm tree pollen in a patient with allergic rhinitis is described.

Anaphylaxis induced by the ingestion of bee-pollen has been reported [10]; interestingly, this may be the first report of anaphylaxis induced by the oral consumption of date pollen.For individuals with allergic rhinitis triggered by date palm pollen, avoidance of the ingestion of date palm pollen is advised.

Consent to publish

Written consent for presentation and publication has been obtained from the patient’s parent.

References
  1. 1.

    Abdulrahman H, Hadi U, Tarraf H, Gharagozlou M, Kamel M, et al. Nasal allergies in the Middle Eastern population: results from the “Allergies in Middle East Survey”. Am J Rhinol Allergy 2012; 26:S3–23.

     
  2. 2.

    Mahboub B, Al-Hammadi S, Prakash VP, Sulaiman N, Blaiss M, et al. Prevalence and triggers of allergic rhinitis in the United Arab Emirates. WAO Journal 2014; 7:19.

     
  3. 3.

    Alsowaidi S, Abdulle A, Shehab A, Zuberbier T, Bernsen R. Allergic rhinitis; prevalence and possible risk factors in the Gulf Arab population. Allergy 2010; 65:208–12.

     
  4. 4.

    Hasnain SM, Al-Frayh AR, Subiza JL, Fernandez-Caldas E, Casanovas M, et al. Sensitization to indigenous pollen and moulds and other outdoor allergens in allergic patients from Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, and Sudan. WAO Journal 2012; 5:59–65.

     
  5. 5.

    Huertas AJ, Lopez-Saez MP, Carnes J. Clinical profile of a Mediterranean population sensitised to date palm pollen (Phoenix dactylifera). A retrospective study. Allergol Immunopathol (Madr) 2011:39–145–9.

     
  6. 6.

    Serhane H, Amro L, Sajiai H, Yazidi AA. Prevalence of skin sensitization to pollen of date palm in Marrakesh, Morocco. J Allergy (Cairo) 2017. Epub 2017 Feb 8.

     
  7. 7.

    Kwaasi AA, Harfi HA, Parhar RS, Al-Sedairy ST, Collison KS, et al. Allergy to date fruits: characterization of antigens and allergens of fruits of the date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.). Allergy 1999; 54:1270–7.

     
  8. 8.

    Rasekh A, Jashni HK, Rahmanian K, Jahromi AS. Effect of palm pollen on sperm parameters of infertile men. Pak J Biol Sci 2015; 18; 196–9.

     
  9. 9.

    Elkerm Y, Tawashi R, Date palm pollen as a preventative intervention in radiation and chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis: a pilot study. Integr Cancer Ther 2014; 13:468–72.

     
  10. 10.

    Choi J, Jang Y, Kim C, Hyun I. Bee pollen-induced anaphylaxis: a case report and literature review. Allergy Asthma Immunol Res 2015; 7:513–517.

     

P70

How reliable is a patient history?—Symptom recall over time in young people and their parents

Nandinee Patel*, Goncalo Abrantes, Sarah Lindsley, Joan Bartra, Marta Vazquez-Ortiz, Paul J. Turner

Section of Pediatrics, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom

Correspondence: Nandinee Patel - nandinee.patel@imperial.ac.uk

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P70

Introduction

An accurate clinical history is essential in the risk assessment of food-allergic patients, but patients are often seen many months after a food-induced allergic reaction. We assessed patient and parent recall of symptoms occurring at an observed food challenge, up to 1 year later.

Method

A brief, standardized interview was conducted at set time points up to a year following completion of a double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) to peanut. The interview assessed recall and perception of reaction symptoms. Parents and patients were interviewed separately, immediately after challenge and then at 3–6 weeks, 6 and 12 months later.Data was analysed for differences over time, and concordance between parent and patient report. The study was approved by the NHS Health Research Authority and informed consent/patient assent was obtained.

Results

Fifty-four young people (age 8–17 years, 54% boys) and their parents participated; 15 (28%) experienced anaphylaxis. Immediately following a reaction, both the participants and their parent recall approximately 50% of symptoms correctly, which is improved with specific prompting from the healthcare professional enquiring about organ-specific symptoms. Anaphylaxis was correctly identified in most cases, but this is potentially confounded by the automatic use of parenteral adrenaline to treat anaphylaxis in the study. However, recall worsens over time, with over half of young people no longer giving a history of anaphylaxis after 6 + months, despite prompting by the healthcare professional.

Conclusions

Symptom recall worsens over time, but may be unreliable even hours after a reaction, with most patients and their parents under-reporting symptoms. Importantly, many anaphylactic reactions may not be classified as such by a healthcare professional taking a history months later due to this phenomenon. It is important to document reaction symptoms at the earliest opportunity in order to facilitate patient assessment and management strategies.

P71

Conversation groups for adolescents with severe food allergy at the Allergy Clinic, Gentofte University Hospital—a pilot project

1Pernille Allesen-Holm, 1Astrid Frostholm Møller, 1Majbrit Høite Hansen*, 2Kirsten Skamstrup Hansen

1Allergy Clinic, Gentofte Hospital, Gentofte, Denmark; 2Allergy Clinic and Department of Pediatrics, Gentofte and Herlev Hospital, Gentofte, Denmark

Correspondence: Majbrit Høite Hansen - majbrit_hh1@hotmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P71

Introduction

The primary goal was to establish a conversation group where adolescents could meet equals and discuss challenges and experiences when dealing with severe food allergy. Secondarily with in-put from the adolescents, we wanted to improve the Clinics offer to these adolescents and this specific patient group.

Method

The conversation groups were scheduled as afternoon sessions of 1½ h. We aimed at 5–8 participants in the age 12–20 years.

Two nurses mediated the session—the conversation took place in a relaxed atmosphere at the Allergy Clinic, i.e. in surroundings known to the participants. The conversation was free, but cardboard cards with predefined topics were used as a guide.

At the end of each session, the participants were asked to fill out a questionnaire about their personal out-come of the conversation.

Results

In all, 5 sessions with different participants have been conducted since spring 2014.

We have experienced that the adolescents, when they meet peers in this set-up, take the opportunity to talk about the impact of the disease on their daily life, and that they exchange coping strategies regarding the life with severe food allergy.

In the questionnaire all participants responded that it had been a positive experience and that they would like to participate again.

Conclusion

Based on the results of the present study, we have implemented conversation groups as an offer to adolescents with severe food allergy two times a year.

Further, we have initiated a new project regarding the transition and education of the adolescent patients with severe allergy.

P74

Allergy to Limanda aspera (yellowfin sole)

Marta Viñas1*, Fernando Pineda2, Adriana Izquierdo-Dominguez1, Miriam Castillo2, Maria Jose Castillo1, Judit Barrena1, Belen Delavalle1, Marcel Ibero1, Nora Hernandez1

1Hospital de Terrassa, Terrassa Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 2Laboratorio Diater, Madrid, Spain

Correspondence: Marta Viñas - martavinas@hotmail.es

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P74

Introduction

We report the case of a 2-year-old boy who after eating or touching Limanda aspera (a kind or white fish) in the nursery, immediately presented facial urticaria. He tolerates the rest of fishes like sole, cod, monkfish, hake or tuna. Personal history of atopy: allergic to nuts presenting acute urticarial with hazelnuts and almonds. The yellowfin sole, Limanda aspera, is a flatfish of the Pleuronectidae family that lives on soft, seafloor at depths of up to 700 metres. Its natural habitat is the temperate waters of the Northern Pacific.

Method

Prick test with different, nuts, fishes and Anisakis simplex were performed. Total and specific IgE were determined for prick test positive extracts and fish. Specific allergy study included SDS-PAGE with Western Blot to Limanda aspera extract.

Results

Prick tests were positive for all nuts and negative for all fish and Anisakis. Prick by prick for cooked Limanda was negative, but positive for raw Limanda. Total IgE: 761.6 U/mL. IgE specific to rGad c 1: 0.27, sole: 0.25; almond: 4.27; hazelnut: 26.9; peanut: 11.9; pistachio: 41.2, chestnut: 9.24, pine nut: 1.71, rAra h 2 < 0.1, rAra h 9: 10.1, rJug r 3: 12.9, rJug r 1: 27.2 kU/L. Western Blot recognised two proteins of 35 and 37 kDa in the extract of Limanda aspera and no band for tuna, cod, sole, Anisakis simplex, or hake.

Conclusions

We report a case of food allergy to Limanda aspera with good tolerance to the rest of fish species. Western Blot recognised two proteins with molecular weights of 35 and 37 kDa for Limanda aspera.

Consent to publish

The child’s mother has signed a written informed consent for presentation and publication of this case report.

P76

Food protein-induced enterocolitis to cephalopoda in adults

Purificacion Gonzalez-Delgado1*, Victoria Moreno2, Teodoriked Jimenez1, Begoña Cueva1, Mariela Lindo1, Javier Fernandez1,2

1Allergy Service, General Universitary Hospital, Alicante, Spain; 2Medicine Department, Universidad Miguel Hernandez, Elche, Spain

Correspondence: Purificacion Gonzalez-Delgado - gonzalez_pur@gva.es

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P76

Introduction

In the last years an increased interest on non-IgE mediated food allergy has been observed, especially on food protein-induced enterocolitis (FPIES), an entity that is usually described in the pediatric population. Although FPIES is accepted that can occur at any age, the number of reports is very scarce in adults.

Methods

We report the clinical features of five adults with exclusively gastrointestinal symptoms after ingestion of cephalopoda (squids, octopus, cuttlefish) that were studied in our Allergy section.

Skin tests with cephalopoda, specific IgE and oral food challenge (OFC) were carried out to confirm diagnosis or to know tolerance. A complete blood count with differential was obtained before the OFC and 6 h later if the challege was positive.

Results

All patients related abdominal pain, vomiting and three of them, in addition also had diarrhea. Four patients were female and one male, median age at diagnosis was 38.6 years (range 21–46). The median time of symptoms onset after ingestion was 63 min (range 30–120). Resolution of symptoms occurred between 4 and 48 h spontaneously

The diagnosis was established after a median of 7 previous reactions (5–10).

Skin tests with cephalopoda were negative in all the patients. Specific IgE to squid and octopus was undetectable.

OFC was performed in three patientsbeing positive, two patients refused OFC because repetitive or severe reactions. A median increase of 1100 leucocyte was detected after positive OFC.

Conclusion

We report five adults with symptoms of FPIES after cephalopoda ingestion. Abdominal pain and repetitive vomiting were the predominat features.

Although patients present repetitive episodes, the negative skin tests andthe lack of urticaria or respiratory distress produces a delay in diagnosis. Otherwise the entity is probably underdiagnosed due to the patients avoid ingestion of the causative food and do not seek medical attention in most cases.

P77

Multiple food allergies in childhood is associated with the persistence of food allergy into adolescence

Rebecca McCarthy1*, Genevieve Southgate1, Zaraquiza Zolkipli2, Nicola J. Graham1, Gabrielle A. Lockett1, Yvonne Tan1, Emma Grainger-Allen2, Devasmitha Venkataraman3, Eleanor Minshall4, John W. Holloway1, Mich Erlewyn-Lajeunesse1,2

1Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom; 2The Allergy Clinic, Southampton Children’s Hospital, Southampton, United Kingdom; 3South Tees Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough, United Kingdom; 4Department of Pediatric Allergy, Cambridge University NHS Hospitals Foundation Trust, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, United Kingdom

Correspondence: Rebecca McCarthy - rm2g14@soton.ac.uk

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P77

Introduction

Food allergy (FA) in childhood is a dynamic process. Some children develop secondary tolerance having previously been allergic, whereas others have allergic sensitization that persists into adulthood. Transient FAs typically involve milk, soy, wheat or egg allergens, whilst persistent FAs are associated with peanut, tree nut, fish and shellfish. It is unclear why certain allergens provoke a persistent immune response whilst others permit the development of tolerance. There may be host factors as well as other environmental factors at work. We sought to investigate the clinical phenotypes of children with persistent FAs and compare them to those who outgrew FA. In this abstract we describe the sensitization profile of children with persistent food allergies.

Methods

We undertook at case control study of children with persistent FA comparing them to children who had outgrown FA. Patients aged 4–20 with proven tolerance to a previous allergen were allocated to transient FA group (n = 31). Patients aged 12–20 with positive diagnostics for FA were allocated to the persistent FA group (n = 48).

Results

The only allergens present in isolation were peanut, treenut, egg and milk. Egg and milk allergies in isolation were less likely to be persistent than nut allergies, however these results were not significant (2/10 (20%) vs. 14/25 (56%) (p = 0.71)) (Tables 12).
Table 1

Allergy groups associated with nut and non-nut allergies

 

Transient FA

Persistent FA

Non-nut allergy

8

2

Nut allergy

11

14

Table 2

Allergy group status compared to number of allergens present

 

Mono FA

Multiple FA

Transient FA

19

12

Persistent FA

16

32

Multiple FA was more common amongst persistent FA (32/48 (66.7%) vs. 12/31 (38.7%), p = 0.015).

Several patients (n = 8) had multiple allergies in infancy, but would outgrow some but not all of them (partial persistent FA). All of these patients had at least one persisting allergy, of which peanut was present and persistent in 100%. Similarly, those with multiple FA tended to outgrow egg and milk allergies, while treenut was more likely to persist (Egg 6/6 (100%); Milk 2/2 (100%); Treenut 4/6 (66.7%)). Small group numbers limit the reliability of this data.

When adjusted for eczema status, there was no significant difference between FA group and persistence of eczema (TFA 10/31 (32.3%) vs. PFA 14/40 (35%)).

Conclusion

Our findings suggest multiple food allergies are more likely to persist. This knowledge could lead to multiple food sensitisations in childhood being used as a prognostic marker for allergy. Mono FA, which is persistent, is associated with nuts, but other allergens are sometimes involved, the reason for this sensitisation is still unknown. Whilst eczema is linked to food allergen sensitisation, our study has found current eczema does not appear to be a factor in persistence.

P78

The safety and efficacy of a strictly structured gradual exposure protocol to baked and heated milk in the treatment of milk allergic children

Adi Efron1, Liora Halevi1, Yuri Zeldin2, Avner Reshef3, Nancy Agmon-Levine3, Ron Kenett4, Mona Kidon5*

1Sackler School Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; 2Faculty of Medicine, Ben Gurion University, Beer Sheva, Israel; 3Allergy and Clinical Immunology Unit, Tel Hashomer, Ramat Gan, Israel; 46.KPA Group and Institute for Drug Research, School of Pharmacy, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel; 5Pediatric Allergy Safra Children’s Hospital, Tel Hashomer, Ramat Gan, Israel

Correspondence: Mona Kidon - Mona.Kidon@sheba.health.gov.il

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P78

Introduction

A significant proportion of milk allergic children can tolerate extensively heated and baked milk (EHBM). Exposure to these food products may promote tolerance to unheated milk, however, no consensus exists as to the appropriate treatment protocols utilizing EHBM for children with milk allergy. We retrospectively evaluated a well-controlled and structured gradual exposure protocol (SGEP) with EHBM for the treatment of children with CMA

Methods

In a case control study, milk allergic children aged 1–4 years of age who were treated with a SGEP-EHBM were compared to children treated with strict avoidance at least until 4 years of age. Data was collected from medical records of children in community and hospital based allergy clinics and from validated telephone questionnaires. Data analysis was performed using nominal logistic regression, the Cox proportional hazard model and generalized regression after an evaluation of the matched case control criteria with propensity scores.

Results

42 milk allergic children, 26(62%) males, mean age at intervention 21 months (12–47), were treated with SGEP-EHBM and followed to a mean age of 48 months (24–88). The mean age at resolution of CMA in this intervention group, was compared to a group of 68 milk allergic children following strict avoidance at least until 4 years of age and followed to a mean age of 71 months. We matched for baseline characteristics such as tolerance to heated milk, presence of Atopic Dermatitis (36% vs. 29% controls), asthma (36% vs. 28% controls) and initial anaphylaxis to milk (40% treated vs. 40% controls.) The mean age of resolution of allergy in treated children was 34 months vs. 57 months in control group (p < 0.05). At last follow up, 86% of treated children were tolerant to unheated milk vs. 52% in controls. In the intervention group, there were no adverse events requiring self-administration of epinephrine during or after completion of SGEP.

Conclusion

A structured protocol with EHBM appears to be safe and to promote faster resolution of CMA

P79

Teaching teachers: towards an educational strategy to improve school teachers’ knowledge on food allergy and anaphylaxis

Paloma Poza-Guedes1*, Rosa Gloria Suárez López de Verg2, Ruperto González-Pérez1

1Hospital Universitario de Canarias, Sta Cruz de Ten, Spain; 2Salud Publica-SCS, Sta Cruz de Ten, Spain

Correspondence: Paloma Poza-Guedes - alergocan@hotmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P79

Introduction

Every year, 1/10,000 children experiences an anaphylactic reaction. Most of these events including attack-related deaths that may happen in school hours. In this study, our goals were to investigate school teachers’ knowledge about food allergy and anaphylaxis, and try to improve it.

Methods

During the first half of this school year, a total of 256 teachers working in state schools were included. An educational on-line project held in Tenerife (Spain) was carried out through collaboration of oficial states: Dirección General de Ordenación, Innovación y Promoción Educativa in cooperation with Dirección General de Salud Pública. A pre-/post-tests were used to assess the knowledge that teachers had acquired on food allergy: causes, symptoms, and treatment of food allergic reactions was investigated.

Results

About 80% of the teachers considered that food allergy and anaphylaxis is a worrying problem for the teaching staff while only 7.4% of them agreed that it was a worrying issue only for the schoolchild's family. While 14% of the teachers considered themselves prepared to face a severe food allergic reaction in the school, only 23% of them were aware of an adrenaline autoinjector use, and knew where to apply it. More than 80% of the teachers’ responses considered that this specific educational on-line intervention on food allergy and anaphylaxis would improve their knowledge and management on this subject.

Conclusion

We believe that our results shows that currently school teachers included are not adequately trained in food allergy and anaphylaxis. There is an urgent need to implement allergy management plans and policies to develop new education strategies including all school staff.

P80

Outcome of real-life simulation in the management of anaphylaxis in a Pediatric Emergency Department

Simona Barni1*, Mattia Giovannini1, Francesca Mori1, Elio Novembre1, Marco De Luca2

1Allergy Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Anna Meyer Children’s University Hospital, Florence, Italy; 2Simulation and Risk Management Unit, Anna Meyer Children’s University Hospital, Florence, Italy

Correspondence: Simona Barni - simonabarni@hotmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P80

Introduction

Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening, rapid onset hypersensitive reaction and it is one of the most common emergencies although under-recognized and under-treated [1].

Simulation is a tool that increases exposure to rare events in a safe enviorment and it allows trainers to develop skills without harm to patients [2].

The purpose of our study was to determine if real-life simulation training improves operational performance in a clinical setting and additionally if it modifies the time latency between the anaphylactic event and the allergological evaluation over ten the years before and after the setting of simulation training as part of the annual educational plan of Anna Meyer Children’s Hospital.

Methods

All patients with anaphylaxis referred to the Pediatric Emergency Department (PED) of Anna Meyer Children’s Hospital from 2004 to 2010 [pre-simulation (PRE-s) period] and from 2011 to 2016 [post-simulation (POST-s) period] were retrospectively included in this observational, descriptive study. Diagnosis of anaphylaxis was based on the EAACI guidelines [3]. Clinical characteristics, pharmacological treatments, suspected triggers and results of the allergy work-up were recorded and compared between the two time periods (PRE-s and POST-s).

Results

From 2004 to 2010, 82 out of 873 patients, conducted to the PED of Anna Meyer Children’s Hospital for suspected allergic reactions, filled the criteria of anaphylaxis.

The medications used to treat the anaphylactic reactions before (Pre-PED) and after (In-PED) the arrival at the PED were shown in Table 1. The mean time latency between the anaphylactic event and the allergological evaluation was 31.15 ± 43.3 days.

From 2011 to 2016, 136 out of 481 patients evaluated for suspected allergic reactions were anaphylaxis.

The medications used to treat the anaphylactic reactions Pre-PED and In-PED were shown in Fig. 1b. The mean time latency between the anaphylactic event and the allergy evaluation was 27.6 ± 34.9 days.

The epinephrine use has been significantly increased (p < 0.05) comparing the two time periods (PRE-s and POST-s): 1 out of 41 (2.4%) patients and 6 out of 59 (10%) patients, respectively.

During the two time periods (PRE-s and POST-s) we observed also a significant increase (p = 0.011) of the number of patients who underwent a complete allergy work-up: 49 out of 82 (60%) and 120 out of 136 (88.2%) patient, respectively.

Conclusion

According to our results the real-life simulation improved the management of anaphylaxis in terms of increase of epinephrine use and number of patients referred to the allergy unit for evaluation.

References
  1. 1.

    Johnston EB, King C, Sloane PA et al. Pediatric anaphylaxis in the operating room for anesthesia residents: a simulation study.Paediatr Anaesth. 2017 Feb;27(2):205–210.

     
  2. 2.

    Bradley P. The history of simulation in medical education and possible future directions. Med Educ. 2006 Mar;40(3):254–62.

     
  3. 3.

    Muraro A, Werfel T, Hoffmann-Sommergruber K et al. EAACI food allergy and anaphylaxis guidelines: diagnosis and management of food allergy. Allergy. 2014 Aug;69(8):1008–25.

     
Table 1

Treatment of anaphylactic reaction in PRE-s and POST-s period

Medications

2004–2010 (n; %)

2011–2016 (n; %)

p

Anthistamines

Pre-PED

23;28

40;43

> 0.05

In-PED

44;54

99;70

< 0.05

Corticosteroids

Pre-PED

31;39

59;30

> 0.05

In-PED

49;60

95;73

< 0.05

Bronchodilatators

Pre-PED

14;17

10;7

< 0.05

In-PED

18;22

18;13

> 0.05

Epinephine IM

Pre-PED

5;6

8;6

> 0.05

In-PED

1;2, 4

6;10

< 0.05

No treatment

Pre-PED

35;43

48;73

> 0.05

In-PED

19;23

12;30

< 0.05

Oxigen

Pre-PED

np

np

In-PED

np

5; 4

> 0.05

Fluid IV

Pre-PED

np

3; 33

> 0.05

In-PED

np

33; 24

< 0.05

Epinephrine aerosol

Pre-PED

np

3; 2

> 0.05

In-PED

np

1; 0.7

> 0.05

P81

Avocado and banana-induced Food Protein–Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES): case report of a rare trigger

Evangelia Stefanaki1*, Argiro-Stamatia Manogiannaki2, Angeliki Tzagkaraki2, Angeliki Ftylaki1, Maria Anatoliotaki1, Sofia Stefanaki2, Georgia Vlachaki2

1Outpatients Pediatric Allergy Clinic, Venizelion General Hospital, Heraklion, Greece; 2Department of Pediatrics, Venizelion General Hospital, Heraklion, Greece

Correspondence: Evangelia Stefanaki - linastef74@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P81

Introduction

FPIES is an increasingly diagnosed non-IgE mediated hypersensitivity reaction characterized by profuse vomiting with or without diarrhea leading to dehydration, hypotonia and lethargy. Common triggers differ around the world including milk, soy, rice, poultry, fish.

Case report

A 7 month old boy presented in our Outpatients Pediatric Allergy Clinic with a history of reactions to fruits. He was growing well and had no history of atopic dermatitis or wheezing episodes. He was exclusively breastfeeding until 5 months of age when he started tasting fruits, added one by one in small quantities—1st day apple, 2nd day plus pear, 3rd day plus banana, 4th day plus kiwi, 5th day plus strawberry, 6th day plus nectarine. On day 5, he also started mixed vegetables (½ teaspoon of potato, carrot, zucchini and celery). On day 6 and about 30 min after ½ teaspoon of mixed vegetables and 3 h after mixed fruits he vomited once. Next day he tried again ½ teaspoon of the same mixed fruits and 30 min later he started profuse vomiting for 6 h with nausea, pallor and hypotonia. He was admitted in hospital for 24 h where he was rehydrated. He stopped all solids and 1 week later he was reintroduced fruits one by one every 3 days and more than 30 min after tasting less than ½ teaspoon of banana he started again profuse vomiting for 4 h with hypotonia 0.4 h later he also had 3 diarrheas. He continued breastfeeding and eating all fruits and vegetables he had already tried before plus veal and spaghetti except banana. At 6.5 months of age he tried ½ teaspoon of avocado (family culture) and 1 h later he reacted again with 6 vomits and diarrheas 4 h later. Skin prick tests and specific IgEs were performed to avocado, banana, cow’s milk, egg white, egg yolk, cod, peach, peanut, cashew and all were negative.

Mother was informed to avoid giving avocado and banana to our young patient and to proceed to other solids one by one but without special exclusions.

Conclusion

To our knowledge there is only one report in the literature of FPIES to avocado coming this year from USA so this is the first official report in Europe and the first avocado-banana FPIES case. Clinicians should be aware that less common solid foods could also be triggers of FPIES.

Consent to publish

The authors have obtained parental informed consent of the patient mentioned in the article.

P82

Abdominal cramps, a rare clinical manifestation of food protein-induced allergic proctocolitis

Esmeralda Shehu1*, Anxhela Gurakuqi Qirko2, Diana Qama3, Klejta Xhafaj4, Mirela Hasanaj5

1Internal Medicine, Regional Hospital of Durres, Durres, Albania; 2University of Medicine, Department of Pathophysiology, Tirane, Albania; 3Internal Medicine, Regional Hospital of Berat, Berat, Albania; 4Polyclinic nr 3 Tirane, Albania; 5UHC Mother Teresa, Tirane, Albania

Correspondence: Esmeralda Shehu - shehuesmeralda@yahoo.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P82

Introduction

Food protein-induced allergic proctocolitis (FPIAP) is a non IgE mediated allergic disease which appears in the first few months of life. Approximately 60% of cases occur in breastfed infants, where the principal causes are cow’s milk proteins. Bloody and mucoid stools are the most common clinical presentation and, abdominal cramps are rare in FPIAP.

Case Report

A 7 months old boy, mainly breastfed presented blood and mucus within the stool and, abdominal cramps several times a day. Firstly, he experienced these symptoms at the age of 1 month. At that time he developed a moderate form of eczema too. He was referred at the pediatrician who treated him with simethicone and emollients. But besides the treatment all the symptoms persisted. At the age of 3 months he was referred at another clinic with the same complaints. He continued to take simethicone, emollients and added probiotics with a slight clinical improvement of AD. Rectal bleeding and abdominal cramps still persisted. At the age of 7 months he was referred at our allergy clinic. A complete blood count, lever and renal function were normal. GI infections were ruled out by culture and sensitivity testing. CRP was increased and an abdominal ultrasound resulted normal. His father suffered ulcerative colitis and allergic rhinoconjuctivitis.

On physical examination he showed normal growth indicators according to WHO standards. FPIAP, ulcerative colitis and food induced allergic eczema were clinically suspected. Total IgE was slightly increased, specific IgE to milk was 0.25 IU/ml. Colonoscopy revealed multiple ulcerated inflammatory areas of intestinal mucosa. Biopsy from the colon indicated chronic colitis with eosinophilic infiltration. The FPIAP diagnosis was made. We recommended the mother to start on a strict elimination diet of cow milk and other dairy products and, to continue the breastfeeding. He started the therapy with pimecrolimus cream and emollients for his eczema. After 2 weeks he didn’t experience any abdominal cramp and the stools slowly normalized. His atopic dermatitis was improved significantly. The patient continues his regular follow up in our clinic. We successfully performed a milk challenge with a very good tolerance when he was 1 year old.

Conclusion

Clinicians should consider FPIAP as a possible diagnosis in children with bloody and mucoid stools and abdominal cramps. Colonoscopy and biopsy are very important tools to exclude other colon diseases and to support allergic FPIAP diagnosis. The exclusion of cow’s milk from nursing mother diet proved effective in our case.

Consent to publish

The parents of the patient has provided written consent to publish.

P83

Impact of counselling on the safety profile of oral immunotherapy for food allergy during maintenance phase

Stefania Arasi1*, Lucia Caminiti1, Giuseppe Crisafulli1, Giovanni Passalacqua2, Giovanni Pajno1

1University of Messina, Messina, Italy; 2Allergy and Respiratory Diseases, Ospedale Policlinico San Martino - University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy

Correspondence: Stefania Arasi - stefania.arasi@yahoo.it

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P83

Introduction

Oral immunotherapy (OIT) can effectively induce a clinical desensitization in patients with persistent IgE-mediated allergy to cow’s milk (CMA) and hen’s egg (HE). However, its safety remains one of the major concerns, as adverse events (AEs) are quite frequent, unpredictable and unexpected. AEs can occur with a previously tolerated dose of the offending food during the maintenance phase of desensitization, usually managed at home.

The objective is to assess the impact of a specific counseling and a specific written plan to avoid or reduce AEs occurrence during the maintenance regimen.

Methods

A retrospective analysis was conducted, including two homogeneous groups successfully desensitized by the same OIT protocols. Group A not receiving specific counseling about the possible AEs and Group B receiving counseling and a written plan on how to avoid or reduce AEs during the maintenance regimen.

Results

Group A included 62 patients, 35 desensitized for CM and 27 for HE between 2004 and 2012 (18 male, age range 4–13 years) and Group B included 34 patients, 10 desensitized for CM and 14 for HE between 2013 and 2016 (17 male, age range 4–14 years). Overall, in Group B (who received a written plan), the rate of AEs was 3% of patients versus 21% in Group A (p = 0.002) (Table 1).
Table 1

Description of the adverse events (AEs) during maintenance phase in the two groups

 

GROUP A (n = 62)

GROUP B (n = 34)

COW'S MILK

HEN'S EGG

COW'S MILK

HEN'S EGG

Patients (n)

35

27

20

14

Mean age (range)

9 (4–13)

7 (4–11)

8 (4–12)

8 (4–14)

Male/female

18/17

15/12

11/9

6/8

Mild-moderate reactions

4

0

1

0

Severe reactions

5

3

0

0

Eosinophilic esophagitis (n)

1

0

0

0

Total patients with AEs

10

3

1

0

Conclusion

With a proper information and a structured written instruction plan, the risk of possible AEs during the maintenance phase of food desensitization can be significantly reduced, still maintaining the efficacy of the treatment.

P84

Etiology and characteristics of patients presenting with anaphylaxis to the Pediatric Emergency Centers in Qatar

Mehdi Adeli*, Kahlid Alyafei, Ahmed AlShami, Sabha Nisar

Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar

Correspondence: Mehdi Adeli - madeli@hamad.qa

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P84

Introduction

Anaphylaxis is an acute life–threatening allergic reaction. Qatar having the highest GDP per capita aims to provide the best healthcare services. There are five Pediatric Emergency Centers (PEC) distributed countrywide, serving an average of 610,000 patients annually. The triggers, co morbid diseases and management due to anaphylaxis have not been locally investigated yet and this is the first study on the topic.

This retrospective study is aimed to analyze the characteristics and etiology of patients presenting with anaphylaxis.

Methods

Patient records of all children younger than 14 years, who presented to PEC during the period of 2011 to 2016 were identified by using ICD- 9 diagnostic codes for anaphylaxis. The patient charts for clinical presentation, management, pre-existing comorbid and outcome were reviewed and classified according to the criteria set by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases/Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network for Anaphylaxis diagnosis.

Results

Anaphylaxis was identified in 390 out of the 1051 files reviewed. The incidence was 13.3 per 100,000 visits. Patients below 1 year of age were 17%. The mean age was 3 years and males 69%. Among triggers; food items were 54%, insect venom 25%, medication 7%, aeroallergens 3% and Idiopathic 10%. Asthma was associated with all 5 cases admitted to PICU and with 55% of recurrent anaphylaxis (36%) with no deaths reported. Biphasic reactions were observed in 2%. Comorbid conditions including asthma in 42%, eczema in 27% with 23% below 1 year of age. Among the food; nuts were 38%, unspecified nuts 26%, peanuts 5%, dairy products 10% with 85% of these cases below 2 years, sesame seeds and egg 7% for each, seafood 4% while camel milk in 1 case. Black ant was 48% among insect bites. Horse dander in 2 cases, camel hair, latex and MMR vaccine each had one case. Presenting symptoms include cutaneous in 92% of cases, respiratory 73%, gastrointestinal 41%, cardiac 9% and neurological 5%. Intramuscular adrenaline was used for treatment in 91%, antihistamines in 88%. Epinephrine auto-injectors were prescribed upon discharge for 83%. Referral to allergy clinic was seen in 82%, where 60% were followed up and investigated.

Conclusion

Anaphylaxis is a life threatening problem, affecting 1 in 1000 Qatari pediatric population. Physician and community awareness of anaphylaxis; its etiology, management and comorbid diseases associated with it is highly recommended.

P85

Use of self-injectable epinephrine among children with food allergy

Alberto Alvarez-Perea*, Victoria Fuentes-Aparicio, Paula Cabrera-Freitag, Sonsoles Infante, Oliver Muñoz-Daga, Jose M. Zubeldia, Maria L. Baeza

Allergy Service, Hospital Materno Infantil Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain

Correspondence: Alberto Alvarez-Perea - alberto@alvarezperea.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P85

Introduction

Food allergy is the most important trigger of anaphylaxis among the pediatric population. Epinephrine is the drug of choice for the treatment of anaphylaxis, and self-injectable epinephrine devices (SIE) are the preferred method to early treat it in the community. However, its use seems scarce.

Methods

A cross-sectional study was led in a third-level hospital in Madrid, Spain, from September to November 2016. Two hundred consecutive patients attended in the Pediatric Allergy Unit with a diagnosis of food allergy were asked to complete a survey related to their allergy. Patients that had previously received a SIE prescription were recruited. A written informed consent was obtained.

Results

The survey was filled by 193 patients, of which 103 (53.4%) had been prescribed SIE. The cohort included 40 girls (38.8%) and 63 boys (61.2%), with a median age of 9 years (interquartile range 5). Seventy-nine of them (76.7%) had a history of anaphylaxis, 84 (81.6%) had other allergic diseases. The main food allergy elicitors were nuts (54.4%), cow’s milk (35.9%) and egg (34%). Time of evolution since the food allergy diagnosis: less than 1 year 5.8%, 1–5 years 22.3%, over 5 years 71.8%.

Eighty-eight (85.4%) of the patients who had been prescribed SIE declared to always carry the device with them.

Fifty-four (52.4%) of the patients that got a SIE prescription, had a food-triggered allergic reaction after the prescription, within the previous year. Twenty of them (37%) had suffered anaphylaxis. Overall, 12 (22.2%) had received epinephrine. Only 4 (7.4%) of them had used their SIE, while 9 (16.7%) had received epinephrine in a healthcare center.

Conclusion

Accidental exposures are not uncommon among children already diagnosed at risk of food-triggered anaphylaxis. Although most of the patients who had SIE prescribed declared to carry it, they rarely use it. Anaphylaxis in the community remains undertreated.

P86

Food allergic consumer’s views and practices regarding allergist advice and food allergen labeling

Sophia Koo1, Georgios Raptis2*, Konstantinos Gerasimidis1

1Human Nutrition, University of Glasgow, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing, Glasgow, United Kingdom; 2Royal Hospital for Children, Glasgow, United Kingdom

Correspondence: Georgios Raptis - george.raptis@nhs.net

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P86

Introduction

Advice from healthcare professionals on how to interpret the food allergen labelling plays an important role in assisting patients and parents in managing food allergy. On the other hand, the Precautionary Allergy Labelling, is troublesome to many food-allergic consumers due to its ambiguities. Therefore, implementation of a risk-assessment approach, such as the Voluntary Incidental Trace Allergen Labelling (VITAL) used elsewhere is recommended to improve the current food allergen labelling. The aim of this survey was to evaluate allergists’ advice on food allergen labelling, as well as to understand food-allergic patient and parental views and practices based on the food allergen labelling.

Methods

Patients and parents attended a tertiary food allergy clinic were asked to complete a 14-item validated questionnaire at the end of their consultation

Results

Data from a total of 70 respondents were obtained and analyzed. Advice from the allergist was valued by the food-allergic consumers, yet the majority of them greatly depended on the information provided on the food labels when purchasing food. 43% of the respondents claimed that the PAL statement was not useful to them and the majority of the food-allergic consumers (86%) agreed that manufacturers should carry out a risk-assessment approach for the PAL. For those with severe-multiple food allergies, quality of life was much more affected due to limited food products they can purchase.

Conclusion

Findings of this small survey stress the importance of shared responsibility between stakeholders responsible to assist and protect individuals with food allergy. Advice from the allergist, along with clear and consistent labelling of food allergens may alleviate patient and parental anxiety in managing food allergy.

P87

The prevalence of pollen food syndrome and its sensitization profiles in Ukrainian pollen-allergic children

Tetiana Umanets*, Yuriy Antipkin, Volodymyr Lapshyn, Svitlana Matveeva

Institute of Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kiev, Ukraine

Correspondence: Tetiana Umanets - tetiana.umanets@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P87

Introduction

Pollen-food syndrome (PRS) is mediated by immunoglobulin E antibodies; symptoms arise as a result of cross-reactivity between pollen and plant derived food, mainly in adults. Unfortunately, there is no data about the prevalence of PFS in Ukrainian children with pollinosis.

The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of PFS and its sensitization profiles in Ukrainian children with seasonal allergic rhinitis/rhino conjunctivitis.

Methods

A total of 140 patients aged 5–17 with seasonal allergic rhinitis/rhino conjunctivitis were enrolled in this study. The questionnaire on rhinitis and food symptoms, skin prick testing with commercial extracts and fresh fruits or vegetables, specific Ig E to major pollen molecules, profillins (Bet v 2, Phl p 12) and LTP (Art v 3) using ImmunoCAP were performed.

Results

Clinical diagnosis of PFS was made in 51 (36.4%) patients with median aged 9 y.o. and 38 (74.5%) of those were male. In patients sensitized to weed, birch tree and grass pollen, the prevalence of PFS ranged respectively 54.9%, 36.1%; 3.6%. Nuts, apple, bananas and tomatoes were the food most commonly implicated. Among included patients, 5 (3.6%) of the children had a history of anaphylaxis to nuts. Ig E to Bet v 1 and Bet v 2 was observed in 6 (27.3%) PFS (+) patients and associated with > 2 fruits more likely to be hazelnut and apple vs. 2 (5.1%) PFS (-) birch-allergic patients. In the group of PFS (-) grass-allergic patients, two patients showed Ig E to Phl p 12. There were no patients with IgE to Atr v 3.

Conclusion

Birch and weed–related PFS are common in Ukrainian pollen-allergic children, with nuts and fruit predominantly implicated. The main source of profiling sensitization was birch pollen, and profiling sensitization was associated with PFS and larger number of offending foods.

P88

Introduction and maintenance of early adaptive training protein blends in support of infant nutritional goals: safety and acceptability

Jany Holl1*, Lucy Bilaver1, Daniel Finn1, Kay Savio2

1Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, United States of America; 2Focus Pointe Global, Inc., St. Louis, MO, United States of America

Correspondence: Jany Holl - j-holl@northwestern.edu

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P88

Introduction

Childhood food allergy affects about 8% of US children [1]. Recent research has revealed protective effects of early dietary introduction of allergenic foods on the development of food allergy for infants, including those at elevated risk [2, 3, 4]. The goal of this study was to evaluate the safety and acceptability of a blend of 16 common allergenic proteins (peanut, soy, almond, cashew, hazelnut, pecan, pistachio, walnut, wheat, oat, milk, egg, cod, shrimp, salmon, sesame) combined with 400 IU of Vitamin D into a food supplement powder.

Methods

Caregivers were instructed to mix the powder into a solid or liquid feeding once a day. All procedures were deemed exempt by the Northwestern University Institutional Review Board. A national sample (from 32 states) of healthy infants, 5–11 months of ages, without severe eczema, participated in the 28-day placebo period followed by a 28-day randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled period. Caregivers added one packet (approximately 1 tablespoon) of the placebo/food supplement powder to a feeding once a day. Caregivers were instructed to observe their infant for 2 h after the feeding and to record any symptom(s) or allergic type reaction(s) including anaphylaxsis [5] occurring within 2 h after the feeding, any reaction-related prescribed medication or medical care, in a daily, web-based diary.

Results

Figure 1 shows enrollment and completion rates of the study. Of the 19,208 placebo ingestions, 2% of ingestions resulted in a reported symptom (e.g., cough, diarrhea). Of the 8827 food supplement ingestions to date, no infant has had any reported allergic reaction, received any prescribed medication, or received medical care related to a reaction within 2 h of ingestion. Final results will be available for the entire cohort in 3 weeks.
Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Enrollment and completion rates

Conclusion

At present, this study strongly suggests that the food supplement is safe and feasible for infants. Future study should assess the effect of the food supplement on immunologic responses to the allergenic proteins and on the longer-term incidence of food allergy.

References
  1. 1.

    Gupta et al. The Prevalence of Childhood Food Allergy. Pediatrics 2011

     
  2. 2.

    Fleischer et al. Primary Prevention of Allergic Disease Through Nutritional Interventions. Allergy Clin Immunol 2013

     
  3. 3.

    Perkin et al. Randomized Trial of Introduction of Allergenic Foods in Breast-fed Infants. N Engl J Med 2016

     
  4. 4.

    Du Toit et al. Randomized Trial of Peanut Consumption in Infants at Risk for Peanut Allergy. N Engl J Med 2015

     
  5. 5.

    Sampson et al. Second Symposium on the Definition and Management of Anaphylaxsis: Summary Report—Second National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease/Food Allergy and Anaphylaxsis Network Symposium. JACI 2006

     

P89

Food refusal in autism: Is it undiagnosed food allergy?

Miranda Crealey*, Aideen Byrne

Department of Pediatric Allergy, Our Lady’s Children’s Hospital Crumlin, Dublin, Ireland

Correspondence: Miranda Crealey - mirandac@eircom.net

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P89

Introduction

Autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with restrictive or repetitive behaviours and difficulties with verbal and interpersonal communication. There has been a 269% increase in prevalence in ASD from 4.2 per 1000 in 1996 to 15.5 per 1000 in 2010 [1]. The incidence of food allergy is also increasing [2]. Dysbiosis of the human microbiome has been linked with both food allergies and autism [3].

Estimates suggest upwards of 90% of children with ASD experience some type of feeding related concern [4]. Food selectivity (i.e., only eating a narrow variety of foods by type texture, and/or presentation) represents the most pervasive feeding issue while rejecting most (if not all) fruits, vegetables, and/or proteins [5]. Concurrently, food refusal is well described in children with food allergy; selective avoidance of egg containing foods by young children with egg allergy. However, more complex feeding disorders are increasingly being recognised in children with food allergy with fussy eating at baseline being more common [6]. The incidence of food allergy in children with autism is unknown but is likely significantly underestimated. Food refusal may represent avoidance from foods which cause symptoms of food allergy e.g. oral tingling/itching in oral allergy syndrome.

Case report

Table 1 reports the clinical characteristics of three children with ASD attending our tertiary referral allergy service. All three have at least one confirmed immediate allergic reaction to food. All 3 children were sensitised to an extensive profile of foods.
Table 1

Clinical characteristics of 3 children with ASD and confirmed food allergy

 

Case 1

Case 2

Case 3

Referral source

ED

GP

dermatology

Reason for referral

Egg anaphylaxis

Multiple food refusals

Multiple food reactions

Age

3

7

9

Atopic disease

Eczema, asthma

Eczema, asthma

Eczema, asthma, AR

Clinical reactions to food

Egg anaphylaxis

Milk

Milk, egg, kiwi, wheat

Food intake

Repeatedly spits out food

Multiple food refusals

Food refusal and aversion to most foods since weaning

Multiple food refusals, avoids all fruit and vegetables

Sensitisations (SPT or specific IgE)

Egg, peanut, treenuts, salmon, tuna, cod, sesame seed, beef, chicken, banana, broccoli.

Egg, peanut, treenuts, cod, wheat, chicken, sesame seed, banana, rice, carrot, pear, soya, Pru P 4 Profilin Peach

Wheat, milk, peanut, tree nuts, cod, soya

rPru P 3 LTP Peach

rPru P 4 Profilin Peach

Birch PR-10 rBet v1

Birch Profilin rBet v2

ASD autistic spectrum disorder, ED emergency department, GP general practioner, AR allergic rhinitis, SPT skin prick test

All 3 children display behaviours to multiple foods that they may or may not be sensitised to including food refusal, aversion, spitting out, gagging leading to significant dietary restriction. Case 2 failed to thrive and had vitamin D deficiency and was extensively investigated to out rule other organic causes e.g. Eosinophilic Oesophagitis. All children were non-verbal. Parental anxiety was significant in all cases. Food Challenges were not feasible due to the children’s behaviours thus it is impossible to establish for certain whether specific food refusals were due to dysfunctional eating habits of ASD or true food allergy symptoms.

Conclusion

We wish to highlight that physicians face challenges both in the diagnosis and management of food allergy in the autistic child. The history may be that of multiple food refusal and food aversions. Symptoms of non-IgE mediated allergy and of oral allergy syndrome (OAS) may not be easily identifiable to the parent or the physician and may not be communicated by the autistic child. Investigations are limited and often multiple sensitisations are present. Skin prick testing and blood testing may not be successful with oral food challenges often impossible in an autistic child. We recommend that parents must be guided by food refusals in these children and that they are supported by dietetics, psychologists and speech and language to avoid nutritional deficiencies and a feeling of abandonment.

Consent to puplish

The parents of all 3 cases provided informed consent.

References
  1. 1.

    Van Naarden Braun K, Christensen D, Doernberg N, Schieve L, Rice C, Wiggins L, et al. Trends in the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder, cerebral palsy, hearing loss, intellectual disability, and vision impairment, metropolitan atlanta, 1991–2010. PLoS One. 2015;10(4):e0124120.

     
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    Branum AM, Lukacs SL. Food allergy among children in the United States. Pediatrics 2009;124(6):1549–55.

     
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    Haahtela T. What is needed for allergic children? Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2014;25(1):21–4.

     
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    Ledford JR, Gast DL. Feeding problems in children with autism spectrum disorders: A review. Focus Autism Other Dev Disabl. 2006; 21:153–166.

     
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    Sharp WG, Jaquess DL, Luckens CT. Multi-method assessment of feeding problems among children with autism spectrum disorders. Res Autism Spectr Disord. 2013; 7:56–65.

     
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    Maslin K, Dean T, Arshad SH, Venter C. Fussy eating and feeding difficulties in infants and toddlers consuming a cows’ milk exclusion diet. Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2015: 26: 503–508.

     

P90

Do parents successfully introduce peanut following a negative open peanut challenge in young children?

Helyeh Sadreddini1, Heidi Ball1, Kristian Bravin1, David Luyt1, Mhorag Duff2, Gary Stiefel1*

1University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, United Kingdom; 2Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust, Leicester, United Kingdom

Correspondence: Gary Stiefel - garystiefel@icloud.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P90

Introduction

The LEAP study showed that in infants at high risk of peanut allergy (PA) early introduction (between 4 and 11 months old) and regular consumption of peanut reduced the risk of subsequently developing PA. These findings were confirmed in the EAT study but in a cohort of unselected infants. The observations seen in these two studies may well be dose dependent as compliance seemed to impact on the PA preventative efficacy of early peanut introduction. We consequently assessed in our allergy service whether early peanut introduction following a negative peanut challenge is successful in a clinical setting; and how parents perceived this.

Methods

In the Children’s Allergy Service in Leicester, we started assessing children < 2 years old presenting predominantly with egg allergy and/or moderate to severe eczema for peanut allergy from March 2015. Where peanut SPTs were ≥ 1 mm, patients’ were offered an oral peanut challenge to determine allergy. We conducted telephone interviews to assess progress in February and March 2017 of patients with negative challenges to December 2016. Parental satisfaction was also sought.

Results

The carers of 65% (41/63) infants with negative challenges were successfully contacted. Twelve meet LEAP criteria, 12 meet LEAP criteria but were > 12 months old and 17 did not meet the criteria. Peanut was successfully introduced in 34 (83%); 28 consumed peanut at least once a week of which 15 were more than 3 times a week. Fourteen consumed at least 2 g per portion and a further 9 managed a 2 g portion some of the time.

Reasons for failure to introduce peanut were parental anxiety, disliking peanut, burdensome and in 2 cases suspected allergic reactions (Rash after 2 h and eczema flare).

Parents contacted were satisfied with the clinic appointment and subsequent challenge service as over 80% scored ≥ 9 on a Likert scale.

Conclusion

We showed that after successful peanut challenge in young children, a high proportion of carers subsequently interviewed introduced peanut into their child’s diet. However as a third were not contacted, we can only be sure that just over half complied with advice. Perhaps closer contact with families may improve feedback and compliance although those who were contacted expressed satisfaction with our service.

P91

Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis: a rarity to remember

Nafsika Sismanoglou*, Dinkar Bakshi

Nottingham Children’s Hospital, Nottingham University Hospitals Trust, Nottingham, United Kingdom

Correspondence: Nafsika Sismanoglou - nausicasigma@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P91

Introduction

Wheat is a widely consumed cereal and one of the commonest food allergens(1).Occasionally, wheat ingestion triggers symptoms with varying levels of physical activity and presence of cofactors (e.g. NSAIDS, oestrogens, infections)(2). Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) is rare, with estimated prevalence of under 0.1%(3).Although potentially life threatening, diagnosis is challenging due to the inconsistency of symptoms. A ‘provocation’ food challenge followed by exercise in a controlled environment remains the gold standard for diagnosis (4).

Case report

A 13 year old girl was diagnosed with tree nut allergy at 2 years age. She was sensitised to pistachionut, cashewnut and walnut, both on skin prick testing (SPT) and specific IgE antibody (sIgE) testing. She had seasonal allergic rhinitis with grass pollen sensitisation and atopic background with a total IgE antibody level of 500 kU/L. She was not sensitised to wheat on tests. The girl had outgrown her infantile atopic dermatitis and did not have symptoms of asthma.

About 3 years prior to the presentation, she had an episode of generalised rash following ingestion of bread at school. She continued to have sporadic episodes of mouth itching, flushing, generalised urticaria, colicky abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhoea, associated with ingestion of pasta followed by vigorous physical activity (tennis, running). The symptoms would manifest within minutes of initiating exercise, and would always subside with antihistamines. She is a keen tennis player with no symptoms when avoiding wheat prior to exercise. The history was strongly indicative of WDEIA, therefore a ‘provocation’ food challenge with exercise was deemed redundant. Currently, she has gluten free diet in school and is careful to avoid exercise following wheat ingestion at home. She is excluding all nuts in her diet and was prescribed antihistamines and adrenaline autoinjector devices for emergency use.

Conclusion

WDEIA is a rare condition, with inconsistent symptoms and variable presentation, accounting for delays in diagnosis up to 62 months(5).The lack of an identifiable trigger causes not only unnecessary anxiety to families, but also restrictive and impracticable diet patterns. The diagnosis is dependent on a good history since both SPT and sIgE antibody testing may not show sensitisation to wheat(6). Notably, a delay in diagnosis exposes patients to the risk of severe or even a life threatening reaction. Therefore, there is a clear need to raise awareness amongst clinicians about WDEIA.

Consent to publish

The family gave consent for publication of the anonymised clinical details used in this abstract.

References
  1. 1.

    Cianferoni A. Wheat allergy: diagnosis and management. Journal of Asthma and Allergy. 2016:9 13–25

     
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    Wolbing F, Fischer J, Koberle M, Kaesler S, Biedermann T. About the role and underlying mechanisms of cofactors in anaphylaxis. Allergy 2013, 68:1085–1092

     
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    Barg W, Medrala W, Wolanczyk-Medrala A, Exercise-induced anaphylaxis: An update on diagnosis and treatment. Curr Allergy Asthma Rep. 2011, 11:45–51

     
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    Povesi—Dascola C and Caffarelli C. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis: A clinical view.Italian Journal of Pediatrics 2012, 38:4

     
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    Wong GK, Huissoon AP, Goddard S, Collins DM, Krishna MT. Wheat dependent exercise induced anaphylaxis: is this an appropriate terminology?, J Clin Pathol. 2010 Sep;63(9):814–7.

     
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    Kleiman J, Ben-Shoshan M. Food-dependent exercise—induced anaphylaxis with negative allergy testing, BMJ Case Rep 2014.

     

P92

The association of stress during pregnancy with the development of food allergies in childhood: a pilot retrospective questionnaire based study

Soo K. Oh1, Susan Leech2, Imran Ali1, Cherry A. Alviani2*

1Department of Medicine, King’s College, London, United Kingdom; 2Department of Pediatrics, King’s College Hospital, London, United Kingdom

Correspondence: Cherry A. Alviani - cherryalviani@googlemail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P92

Introduction

Food allergy is increasingly common. Prenatal maternal stress is associated with asthma and allergic rhinitis, but its role in food allergy has not been clarified. This retrospective case–control study investigates whether mothers of children with food allergy experienced greater prenatal stress than mothers of children without food allergy.

Methods

Mothers of children attending the Allergy and General Pediatric Clinics at King’s College Hospital and Croydon University Hospital, from March to July 2016, were asked to complete a questionnaire. The questionnaire captured pre-and post-natal demographic details. Prenatal stressful experiences were recorded by 11 events from the Sarason’s Life Experience Survey, with two additional free-text entries. A total of 13 negative events were recorded per mother. Perceived pre-natal stress was assessed using a modified Cohen’s Perceived Stress Scale and Prenatal Distress Questionnaire, generating a 9 item questionnaire with Likert scale responses. Differences in stress scores were analyzed using SPSS. Regional ethical approval was obtained and consent implied upon completion of a questionnaire.

Results

32 mothers of children with food allergy (FA) and 40 mothers of children attending general pediatric clinics (controls), without food allergy, were recruited. Children were older in the FA group (2.89 years vs. 1.96 years p = 0.019). The FA group had a higher rate of emergency caesarean (25.8% vs. 7.50%; p = 0.048), higher rate of eczema (75% vs. 35.9%; p = 0.001) and higher rate of atopic family history (90.63% vs. 60.53%; p = 0.006). There was trend towards a higher number of pre-natal stressful events within the FA group- 1.94 (SD 2.11) events per mother vs. 1.58 (SD 1.85) in controls, which was not statistically significant (p = 0.761). In particular, higher rates of illness during pregnancy were reported by mothers of FA children. There was no difference between the two groups in maternal perceived stress, with an average score of 82.6 (SD.31.9) in the FA group vs. 88.3 (SD 40.1) (p = 0.514, 95% CI -11.70 to 23.18).

Conclusion

This study demonstrates a trend towards higher number of pre-natal negative events, particularly medical illness, in mothers of children developing food allergy compared to controls recruited from general pediatric clinics. This difference was not statistically significant, but study numbers were small. FA children were older than controls, and the control group had higher rates of atopy than expected from a general population. Further exploration of the link between maternal pre-natal illness and food-allergy is needed.

P93

Pediatric anaphylaxis in the Emergency Department: incidence, provocative factors and use of epinephrine

Hiske Mevius1∞*, Miranda Wiggelinkhuizen2∞, Wilma Vriesman1

1Pediatric Department, Albert Schweitzer Hospital, Dordrecht, The Netherlands; 2Pediatric department, Erasmus MC - Sophia Children’s Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

First authors that contributed equally to this work

Correspondence: Hiske Mevius - hiskemevius@gmail.com

Clinical and Translational Allergy 2018, 8(Suppl 2):P93

Introduction

Anaphylaxis is a severe, potentially fatal systemic reaction with a rapid onset, after contact with a causative allergen (1). The exact incidence of pediatric anaphylaxis in the Emergency Department (ED) is unknown (1, 2). According to a recent European study, an estimated range is from 0.11 to 0.41%(3), with a rising worldwide overall incidence (4, 5). The objective of this study is to determine the incidence of pediatric anaphylaxis in the ED and to define causative allergens. As some studies show striking evidence for non adherence to the protocol of treatment of anaphylaxis (6–10), reflected by the low percentage of epinephrine application, we studied the frequency of epinephrine gifts as well.

Methods

A retrospective study was performed at the ED in a large general hospital in The Netherlands. All patients from 0 to 18 years that presented from January 2012 until December 2016 with anaphylaxis, with Sampson score ≥ 3, were included (Fig. 1). Age, sex, medical history, medication, symptoms at presentation, management before and in the ED and at discharge, follow up, including return visits and diagnostics performed, were extracted from medical records.
Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Flowchart of participants

Results

Out of 37618 pediatric patients that presented in the ED during our study period, 75 participants met our inclusion criteria, resulting in an incidence from 0.20%. Nutrition represented 91% (68/75) of the causative allergens; with cashew as main provocative factor with 28% (21/75), followed by peanut with 17% (13/75) (Fig. 2). In 40% of all participants (30/75) the allergen, that caused anaphylaxis, was already confirmed and no tests were repeated to confirm the diagnosis at this presentation. In 53% (40/75) the allergen was stated by clinical history and sensitization tests and in 44% (33/75) oral food challenges were performed to confirm the trigger or to reject other possible allergens as a cause. A percentage of 61% (49/75) received epinephrine, from which 36% (27/75) out of hospital and 25% (19/75) in the ED.
Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Causative allergens

Conclusion

The incidence of pediatric anaphylaxis in the ED is consistent with recent previous studies (3). Allergic reaction to food was most common. Type of allergen is however surprising, with cashew allergy appearing to be obviously more common than expected allergy to peanut. We advise a complete allergy work-up in all children with anaphylaxis, to objectively define the causative allergen in case of anaphylaxis. In our study, administration of epinephrine was only 61%, in this revealing non adherence to local protocols. This is consistent with findings of other studies (6–10).

References
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    Simons FE, Ardusso LR, Bilo MB, El-Gamal YM, Ledford DK, Ring J, et al. World allergy organization guidelines for the assessment and management of anaphylaxis. The World Allergy Organization journal. 2011;4(2):13–37. Epub 2011/02/01.

     
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    Lieberman P, Nicklas RA, Oppenheimer J, Kemp SF, Lang DM, Bernstein DI, et al. The diagnosis and management of anaphylaxis practice parameter: 2010 update. The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology. 2010;126(3):477–80 e1-42. Epub 2010/08/10.

     
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    Alvarez-Perea A, Ameiro B, Morales C, Zambrano G, Rodriguez A, Guzman M, et al. Anaphylaxis in the Pediatric Emergency Department: Analysis of 133 Cases After an Allergy Workup. The journal of allergy and clinical immunology In practice. 2017. Epub 2017/04/09.

     
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    Ben-Shoshan M, Clarke AE. Anaphylaxis: past, present and future. Allergy. 2011;66(1):1–14. Epub 2010/06/22.

     
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    Decker WW, Campbell RL, Manivannan V, Luke A, St Sauver JL, Weaver A, et al. The etiology and incidence of anaphylaxis in Rochester, Minnesota: a report from the Rochester Epidemiology Project. The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology. 2008;122(6):1161–5. Epub 2008/11/11.

     
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    Hitti EA, Zaitoun F, Harmouche E, Saliba M, Mufarrij A. Acute allergic reactions in the emergency department: characteristics and management practices. European journal of emergency medicine : official journal of the European Society for Emergency Medicine. 2015;22(4):253–9. Epub 2014/05/21.

     
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    Lauritano EC, Novi A, Santoro MC, Casagranda I. Incidence, clinical features and management of acute allergic reactions: the experience of a single, Italian Emergency Department. European review for medical and pharmacological sciences. 2013;17 Suppl 1:39–44. Epub 2013/04/26.

     
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    Brown AF, McKinnon D, Chu K. Emergency department anaphylaxis: A review of 142 patients in a single year. The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology. 2001;108(5):861–6. Epub 2001/11/03.

     
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    Braganza SC, Acworth JP, McKinnon DR, Peake JE, Brown AF. Pediatric emergency department anaphylaxis: different patterns from adults. Archives of disease in childhood. 2006;91(2):159–63. Epub 2005/11/26.

     
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    Gaeta TJ, Clark S, Pelletier AJ, Camargo CA. National study of US emergency department visits for acute allergic reactions, 1993 to 2004. Annals of allergy, asthma and immunology : official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. 2007;98(4):360–5. Epub 2007/04/27.

     

P94

Cow’s milk allergy and IgE sensitization to cow’s milk protein in lacto-vegetarian children

Dmitry Yasakov, Leyla Namazova-Baranova, Svetlana Makarova*, Olga Kozhevnikova, Marina Snovskaya, Tamara Chumbadze, Oksana Ereshko

FSAI “NSPCCH” of the MH of the Russian Federation, Moscow, Russia

Correspondence: Svetlana Makarova - sm27@yandex.ru