Volume 4 Supplement 3

6th Drug Hypersensitivity Meeting (DHM 6)

Open Access

HLA-B*15:02 genotype associated with hypersensitivity syndrome to lamotrigine in Thai population

  • Napatrupron Koomdee1,
  • Thawinee Jantararoungtong1,
  • Ticha Rerkpattanapipat2,
  • Santirat Prommas1,
  • Siwalee Santon1,
  • Montri Chammanphol1,
  • Apichaya Puangpetch1 and
  • Chonlaphat Sukasem1
Clinical and Translational Allergy20144(Suppl 3):P121

https://doi.org/10.1186/2045-7022-4-S3-P121

Published: 18 July 2014

Background

Lamotrigine is a commonly used in psychiatric patients. The aims of this study were to determine the possible associations of lamotrigine-induced hypersensitivity syndrome with the HLA-B alleles in Thai patients. HLA-B*58:01 allele was also observed in Han Chinese patients with epilepsy and lamotrigine-induced SCARs (severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions).

Method

A total of 133 patients, including 11 patients with lamotrigine-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (MPE; maculo-papular exanthema, SJS; Stevens-Johnson syndrome and TEN; toxic epidermal necrolysis), 9 lamotrigine-tolerant controls and 113 healthy controls were included in this study. HLA-B genotyping was performed. This case-control study was approved by the Ethics Committee of Ramathibodi Hospital.

Results

HLA-B*15:02 allele was present in 27.3% (3/11) of Thai patients with lamotrigine-induced hypersensitivity syndrome but in only 11.1% (1/9) of lamotrigine-tolerant controls and 13.2% of 113 healthy controls (P-value <0.05). Other HLA-B allele, including HLA-B*58:01 was observed in a case group.

Conclusion

Our results support the hypothesis that HLA-B*15:02 contribute to the genetic susceptibility to lamotrigine-induced hypersensitivity syndrome and may be valuable as potential biomarkers for prediction lamotrigine-induced hypersensitivity syndrome in Thai population. A major limitation of this study was the size of the sample available for the analysis. Confirmation of these results in a larger, independent sample is needed.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Laboratory for Pharmacogenomics, Ramathibodi Hospital
(2)
Medicine Department, Ramathibodi Hospital

Copyright

© Koomdee et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

Advertisement