Skip to content

Advertisement

  • Poster presentation
  • Open Access

P05 - Wider neck circumference may be related with symptom persistence in children with allergic rhinitis

  • 1,
  • 2 and
  • 3
Clinical and Translational Allergy20144 (Suppl 1) :P60

https://doi.org/10.1186/2045-7022-4-S1-P60

  • Published:

Keywords

  • Asthma
  • Waist Circumference
  • Rhinitis
  • Allergic Rhinitis
  • Allergic Rhinitis

Background

Obesity is an established risk factor for the occurrence and severity of atopic diseases, particularly asthma in adults and children. Because asthma and allergic rhinitis share common allergic inflammatory pathways, the aim of the study is to investigate the association between fat distributions that is determined by anthropometric measures including neck circumference and the severity and persistence patterns of children with allergic rhinitis (AR).

Method

Children with AR who were followed in outpatient department of our unit were consecutively recruited. The diagnosis and classification of AR were made according to GINA guidelines. Anthropometric measures including height, weight, neck circumference (NC), waist circumference and hip circumference were obtained.

Results

A total of 86 children (63 male, 73.3%) with a mean age of 9.8 ± 2.2 years were included. Mild intermittent rhinitis was diagnosed in 25 (29.1%) patients, mild persistent rhinitis in 13 (15.1%) moderate/severe intermittent rhinitis in 17 (19.8%) and moderate/severe persistent rhinitis in 31 (36.0%) patients. There were no significant differences between children with mild and moderate/severe rhinitis in terms of age, gender and anthropometric measures. However, NC of children with persistent rhinitis were significantly wider than children with intermittent rhinitis (29.8 cm ± 2.7 vs. 28.4 ± 2.1, p=0.013).

Conclusion

Neck circumference, which is a simple tool of anthropometric measures, is more associated with disease persistence pattern in children with AR when compared with conventional methods.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Department of Pediatric Allergy, Gulhane Military School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey
(2)
Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, Gulhane Military School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey
(3)
Department of Pediatrics, Gulhane Military School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey

Copyright

© Yavuz et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

Advertisement