Volume 4 Supplement 1

3rd Pediatric Allergy and Asthma Meeting (PAAM)

Open Access

P61 - Atypical presentation of childhood asthma

  • Selda Ali1,
  • Ileana Maria Ghiordanescu2 and
  • Roxana Silvia Bumbacea3
Clinical and Translational Allergy20144(Suppl 1):P116

https://doi.org/10.1186/2045-7022-4-S1-P116

Published: 28 February 2014

Background

Food allergy and asthma coexist in many children, although it remains unclear whether or not food allergy and asthma are simply associated to each other due to the underlying predisposition to atopic diseases or whether they are actually causally related.

Case description

We present the case of a seven years old boy with recurrent episodes of anaphylaxis (4 in one year). Each episode occurred after ingestion of foods containing peanuts and consisted of generalized urticaria and wheezing. 6 months after the last episode he developed persistent asthma symptoms (shortness of breath, cough and wheezing) first time, while running in the park. He was diagnosed with asthma, according to PRACTALL consensus report.

We performed a complete allergological evaluation. The total IgE was elevated. Skin prick tests to main food and aeroallergens were negative, except for peanut where he developed a wheal of 4/5 mm diameter. We measured the specific serum IgE for most common food allergens, peanut was significantly high. Evaluation of lung function revealed that FEV1 was decreased by 27%.

We recommended avoidance measures of all foods containing peanuts. He received treatment with montelukast sodium 5 mg daily and fluticasone propionate 250 mcg daily, and salbutamol as reliever medication and in case of exacerbation or before a physical activity. He did not have any other episode of anaphylaxis, but we could not step down the inhaled corticosteroid. We also prescribed him epinephrine autoinjector.

Discussion

Children with both food allergy and asthma are at increased risk for severe asthma, particularly if the asthma is uncontrolled. We present the case of an atypical debut of asthma in a child with IgE mediated food allergy. During follow up the evolution of asthma was independent of avoidance measures of the culprit food. The patient might be a candidate for anti-IgE treatment.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Regina Maria Clinic
(2)
Elias Emergency Universitary Hospital
(3)
Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy

Copyright

© Ali et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

Advertisement