Volume 1 Supplement 1

Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Meeting 2011

Open Access

Food allergy in patients with confirmed celiac disease

  • Hadi Peyman1,
  • Mohammed Rez Hafezi Ahmadi2,
  • Monireh Yaghoubi1,
  • Ezatollah Mahmodi1 and
  • Ali Delpisheh3
Clinical and Translational Allergy20111(Suppl 1):P27

DOI: 10.1186/2045-7022-1-S1-P27

Published: 12 August 2011

Background

Celiac disease is mediated by the immune system response to ingested gliadin component of gluten present in wheat. Therefore patients with celiac disease have basically sensitive immune systems which can hypersensitive reactions to different food allergens. The current study aimed to assess food allergy in patients with confirmed celiac disease.

Methods

In this study 25 celiac patients with a mean age of 30.8 ± 13.6 years in Ilam province western Iran were recruited. Approximately 6 ml blood sample was taken from each participant. Food allergy was assessed by EUROIMMUN kit and analyzed by EURO line Scan software (Es). According to Es, patients are categorized into 5 categories including 0 (no specific antibody), 1 (very weak antibodies with no clinical symptoms), 2 (a weak antibody detection/AD and often existing sensitization), 3 (a definite AD), 4 (a strong AD) and 5 (very high antibody titer). The current kit evaluates different food allergy such as fruits, egg, peanut, potato, meat, shellfish, rice and milk.

Results

Out of 25 participants 68% (n=17) were female and 12% (n=3) were school children. Overall, 68% of cases had a food allergy to mixed shellfish. Of them, 16% (n=4) categorized in class 1, 48% (n=12) in class 2 and 40% (n=10) were in classes between 3 to 5. Four patients (16%) had a food allergy to Sesame.

Conclusions

Compared to the similar studies amongst Asian populations, celiac patients living in western Iran had a different pattern of food allergy in which peanut and tree nut were created a low level of allergies and inversely allergy with shellfish was more common. Environmental factors and genetic susceptibilities might contribute to these differences.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Ilam University of Medical Sciences
(2)
Clinical Pathology, Ilam University of Medical Sciences
(3)
Clinical Epidemiology, Ilam University of Medical Sciences

Copyright

© Peyman et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2011

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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